Navigation Links
International team works out secrets of one of world's most successful patient safety programs
Date:6/16/2011

A team of social scientists and medical and nursing researchers in the United States and the United Kingdom has pinpointed how a programme, which ran in more than 100 hospital intensive care units in Michigan, dramatically reduced the rates of potentially deadly central line bloodstream infections to become one of the world's most successful patient safety programmes.

Funded in part by the Health Foundation in the UK, the collaboration between researchers at the Johns Hopkins University, the University of Leicester and the University of Pennsylvania, has led to a deeper understanding of how patient safety initiatives like the Michigan programme can succeed.

"Explaining Michigan: developing an ex post theory of a quality improvement programme" by Mary Dixon-Woods and Emma-Louise Aveling of the University of Leicester; Charles Bosk of the University of Pennsylvania and Christine Goeschel and Peter Pronovost of Johns Hopkins University, is published in the June 2011 edition of Milbank Quarterly.

"We knew this programme worked. It not only helped to eliminate infections, it also reduced patient deaths," said programme leader Peter Pronovost of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who was named as one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people in 2008 and was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, or 'genius grant,' from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. "The challenge was to figure out how it worked".

The researchers found that one of the Michigan programme's most important features is that it explicitly outlined what hospitals had to do to improve patient safety, while leaving specific requirements up to the hospital personnel. A critical aspect of the programme was convincing participants that there was a problem capable of being solved together.

"It was achieved by a combination of story-telling about real-life tragedies of patients who came to unnecessary harm in hospital, and using hard data about infection rates," said co-author Charles Bosk, a professor of sociology in Penn's School of Arts and Sciences and a senior fellow in the Center for Bioethics at Penn.

Infection rates were continuously monitored at hospitals participating in the programme, making it easier for hospital workers to track how well they were doing and where they needed to improve.

The authors conclude that that there are important lessons for others attempting patient safety improvements. Checklists were an essential component, but not necessarily the most important element of the Michigan programme.

"The programme was much more than a checklist," said lead author Mary Dixon-Woods, professor of medical sociology at the University of Leicester, "It involved a community of people who over time created supportive relationships that enabled doctors and nurses in many hospitals to learn together, share good practice, and exert positive pressure on each other to achieve the best outcomes for patients."

"What we have learned is that it is the local teams that deliver the results", said Dr Bosk. "But they need to be well supported by a core project team, who have to focus on enabling hospital workers to get things right. That means providing them with scientific expertise to justify the changes they are being asked to make, and standardising measures so they are all collecting the same data. It also means trying to figure out why simple changes that make life better are so difficult for health care delivery systems to do. Getting the whole programme to work, rather than compliance with a single one component, is the key to making health care safer for patients."

"No one discipline has the answer to patient safety problems. We have to bring together contributions from clinical medicine and the social sciences to make real progress in this area" added Dr Provonost. This month, Dr. Pronovost was named director of Johns Hopkins' newly formed Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and senior vice president for patient safety and quality.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary Dixon-Woods
md11@le.ac.uk
44-116-229-7262
University of Leicester
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Global Health Council opens 38th annual international conference in Washington
2. Internationally acclaimed immunologist shares $1 million Shaw Prize
3. International AIDS Society urges world leaders at UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS to integrate a fourth pillar -- HIV cure research -- into the global response to the epidemic
4. UT Southwestern research teams anti-malarial work wins international Project of the Year award
5. Elsevier launches new journal: International Journal of Paleopathology
6. IUPUI behavioral neuroscientist receives international award for alcoholism research
7. 17th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference
8. International training to assist governments of 5 African nations in detecting poor-quality drugs
9. International organizations join forces to promote cardiovascular health
10. An international study in China finds strawberries may slow precancerous growth in the esophagus
11. EPIDEMICS(3) The Third International Conference on Infectious Disease Dynamics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/13/2016)... , ... February 13, 2016 , ... ... Eye Center becomes the first in the area to offer AngioPlex™ Optical Coherence ... of retinal disease, such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other vascular conditions. ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Valentine’s Day is nearly upon us, and most singles could ... outfit, flawless hair, and a sparkling personality are all well and good, but if ... at home with Rover. (Actually, man’s best friend might not even want to be ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... February 13, 2016 , ... Many individuals looking to lead a healthy lifestyle ... reasons. IsoPasta by Isolator Fitness has delved into this niche allowing those giving ... high-carb repercussions. IsoPasta has 30 grams of protein and only 7 grams of ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... February 13, 2016 , ... The producers of Enterprises TV are ... The increasingly modern world of instantaneous consumption proves very convenient for businesses. With new ... oil and coal, which pollutes our air, water, and soil. It can also threaten ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... Tennessee (PRWEB) , ... February 13, 2016 , ... ... Herrington School of Nursing with an in-kind gift of a VeinViewer® Vision ... students as they learn how to start an IV and draw blood, combining ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... Texas , Feb. 12, 2016 On ... for Robotic Surgery at St. David,s North Austin Medical ... da Vinci ® Xi ® Surgical System ... 7000dV. Thiru Lakshman , M.D., colorectal ... a total proctocolectomy utilizing Integrated Table Motion technology, which ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... North Carolina , 12 februari 2016 ... Inc. (AAI/CML), een toonaangevende leverancier van productie ... en biotechnologische industrieën, kondigt vandaag een uitbreiding ... mogelijkheden op haar locatie in ... vraag heeft geleid tot meerdere recente investeringen. ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... Feb. 11, 2016 The primary goal of ... adoption patterns on the usage of liquid biopsy. Key ... - Timeframe of liquid biopsy adoption amidst ... and Evs—by organization type - Sample inflow to conduct ... saliva, stool, serum, and so on. - Correlation analysis ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: