Navigation Links
International team to sequence genomes of fungi
Date:11/9/2011

RIVERSIDE, Calif. With an estimated 1.5 million species, fungi represent one of the largest branches of the Tree of Life. They have an enormous impact on human affairs and ecosystem functioning due to their diverse activities as decomposers and pathogens, and their partnership with host organisms for mutual benefit. To use fungi for the benefit of humankind, an accurate understanding of what exactly they do, how they function, and how they interact in natural and synthetic environments is required.

Jason Stajich, an assistant professor of plant pathology and microbiology at the University of California, Riverside, is a member of an international research team that, in collaboration with the Joint Genome Institute of the U.S. Department of Energy, has embarked on a five-year project to sequence 1000 fungal genomes from across the Fungal Tree of Life.

Called the "1000 Fungal Genomes" project, the research endeavor aims to bridge the gap in our understanding of fungal diversity and is one of 41 projects funded through the U.S. Department of Energy's 2012 Community Sequencing Program.

"The overall plan is to fill in gaps in the Fungal Tree of Life by sequencing at least two species from every known fungal family," said Stajich, a member of UCR's Institute for Integrative Genome Biology. "Once the data is compiled, the project scientists will make use of the data as a starting point for interpreting how these organisms change and use their environment to make a living."

Stajich is co-leading the Fungal Genomes project with Joey Spatafora, a professor of botany and plant pathology at Oregon State University. Along with a team of collaborators, their labs will coordinate the selection of fungal strains to analyze the data to answer questions about the evolution of fungi across the fungi kingdom, the evolutionary relatedness among the fungi, and their gene content.

Essential biological components of the global carbon cycle, fungi break down dead organic material. Collectively, they are capable of degrading almost any naturally occurring biopolymer and numerous human-made ones. Fungi hold considerable promise in the development of alternative fuels, carbon sequestration and bioremediation of contaminated ecosystems. They are important, too, in the production of drugs, chocolate, beer and some cheeses. To date, however, only about 100,000 species of fungi have been named.

"The ability to sample environments for complex communities by sequencing genomic DNA is rapidly becoming a reality and will play an important part in harnessing fungi for industrial, energy and climate management purposes," Stajich said. "However, our ability to accurately analyze these data relies on well-characterized, foundational reference data of fungal genomes."

At least five stock centers the Fungal Genetics Stock Center, University of Missouri, Kansas City; the Robert L. Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium, the University of Arizona; Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures Fungal Biodiversiry Centre, the Netherlands; the U.S. Department of Agriculture Northern Regional Research Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Center for Forest Mycology Research will provide the fungal species for analysis.

Stajich also will be involved in two other proposals funded by the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute:

The thermophilic fungi project: The research team, led by scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, will seek to explore the molecular basis of the evolution of "thermophily," the ability of an organism to grow at a high temperature, in two groups of fungi which, in the long run, could help in developing new thermostable enzymes for industrial applications.

The Coprinopsis cinerea project: Researchers, led by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will work to understand how the model mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea degrades biomass, and profile its development to explore, ultimately, "how to build a mushroom."

"I will explore the role of natural selection and changes in the copy numbers of repetitive elements called transposons to understand how thermophillic fungi have acquired their ability to grow at high temperatures," Stajich said. "For the Coprinopsis project I will help catalog genes and study how these genes are regulated."


'/>"/>

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. New international health survey of sicker adults: Those with a medical home fare better
2. Founder of international telecom company and more to be honored by NJIT
3. Uncovering the blind spot of patient satisfaction and patient expectations: An international survey
4. BGU professor receives US National Distinguished International Science Award for substance abuse work
5. 6th Annual International Translational Medicine Symposium held at Penn
6. Abiraterone acetate improves fatigue in prostate cancer patients, says international clinical trial
7. St. Michaels echocardiology lab awarded international seal of approval
8. UN Member States jeopardize international progress on non-communicable disease epidemic
9. International conference launches revolutionary South Asia autism network
10. Cedars-Sinai movement disorders expert on international task force for dystonia treatment
11. International Poll Shows Many Fear Alzheimers as Much as Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
International team to sequence genomes of fungi
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... Northern ... has recently joined their multi-specialty medical group. The dermatology practice provides general ... , “We’re excited to add this excellent dermatology practice to our group’s medical ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... MT (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... Spectrum Aquatics Launches New ADA Portable ... saving deck space. Since the lift is mounted on wheels, it can be wheeled out ... lock down kit, to fasten to the deck. "We have transformed the feedback from customers ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... Boca Raton, FL (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... supplement development, announced it attended the January ECRM trade show to continue the marketing ... technologically advanced vitamin C supplement, known for providing 400 percent better absorption than traditional ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... International Protein, a company based out ... announced it attended the January ECRM trade show in Hilton Head, SC. , ... was determined to create a line of products that would elevate her fitness regime. ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Mary Magdalene: Grace is Greater than ... the woman who witnessed Jesus Christ firsthand. “Mary Magdalene: Grace is Greater than Sin” ... career as an educator interacting with countless women who had little knowledge of the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/20/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the ... HGB/HCT, BMP, BUN Creatinine, Electrolyte Testing, HbA1c Testing, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, ... 2013 - 2024" report to their offering. ... The global clinical laboratory testing ... Introduction of innovative solutions on the grounds of maximum efficiency ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... N.Y. , Jan. 20, 2017  Palladian ... programs, has announced the launch of an opioid ... new guidelines on opioids and helps stem the ... are often prescribed to treat chronic non-cancer pain ... despite serious risks and lack of evidence regarding ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... NEW YORK , Jan. 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... reach USD 233.7 billion by 2025, according to ... The market is anticipated to be predominantly driven ... companies, resulting into the large-scale production of new ... widen the influx of drugs at an unprecedented ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: