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Innovative Technique Seeks to Prevent Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients
Date:7/23/2013

New York, NY (PRWEB) July 23, 2013

A team of surgeons and members of the breast cancer program of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center is conducting a two-year pilot study of an innovative microsurgery technique coupled with imaging technology to not only prevent lymphedema but also potentially detect and treat it early.

Lymphedema, the accumulation of lymph fluid in the arm and painful swelling due to blocked lymph drainage, occurs in up to 13 percent of breast cancer patients after sentinel node biopsy and external-beam radiation, increasing to 40 percent following complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and radiation.

Lymphedema can also affect other cancer patients. Surgery and radiation after lymph node removal can cause scarring that blocks the lymph ducts, not only in the underarm but also in the legs, groin, pelvis, or neck after treatment for uterine, prostate, ovarian, or prostate cancer, as well as lymphoma and melanoma.

It can be difficult to treat lymphedema, which often requires lifelong therapy with compression garments to prevent lymphangitis (inflammation) and cellulitis in the affected limb. The condition can greatly affect quality of life for breast cancer patients and, some studies suggest, is associated with a two-to-three-fold increase in mortality in the six years following a cancer diagnosis.

The current study of the lymphatic microsurgical preventive healing approach (LYMPHA) is the first to be conducted outside of the University of Genoa in Italy, where it was developed. Dr. Sheldon M. Feldman, the principal investigator, was invited by the developers, Drs. Francesco Boccardo and Corradino Campisi, to observe their team in 2012.

The LYMPHA technique creates a bypass to restore lymphatic flow by connecting lymph vessels to a branch of the axillary vein, a pathway normally severed by node removal or blocked by tissue fibrosis resulting from radiation, says Dr. Feldman, chief of the Division of Breast Surgery and the Vivian L. Milstein Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

Previous techniques for preserving lymphatic flow were lengthy and complex, and surgeons could not predict which patients would develop lymphedema or benefit from intervention. The LYMPHA bypass adds only 20–30 minutes to breast cancer surgery and ALND. “In addition to removing all potentially cancerous lymph nodes, we can now restore lymphatic flow and reduce the patient’s risk of developing lymphedema,” says Dr. Feldman.

Prior to ALND, a blue dye normally used to identify sentinel nodes is injected into the upper arm to map the lymphatic circulation from the arm. During the node dissection, the surgeon preserves a branch of the axillary vein and keeps a suitable length for reaching the lymphatic vessels.

The vein connection, or anastomosis, is then performed by a microvascular surgeon, using a sleeve technique in which the lymphatic vessels are inserted into the cut end of the vein to restore normal lymph flow. A mastectomy is performed at the same time as the node removal and LYMPHA procedure.

Before their surgery, study patients undergo an imaging technique known as lymphoscintigraphy, using a radiotracer such as technetium, and bioimpedance spectroscopy with a device called the L-Dex, to establish baseline lymphatic volume in the arms.

In addition to the regular follow-up visits normally scheduled after an ALND, postoperative monitoring includes physical exams for lymphedema, lymphoscintigraphy, and L-Dex bioimpedance spectroscopy to confirm that the LYMPHA bypass is open and functioning.

“We actually use the L-Dex routinely before breast cancer surgery. Then if patients need lymph node dissection, we carefully monitor them with the L-Dex. If they begin to develop increasing lymph volume in their arm, even if there’s been no external change, we know they are on their way to developing lymphedema,” says Dr. Feldman. “By using a support sleeve and seeing a physical therapist (for range-of-motion exercises), they may never experience lymphedema.”

This study is part of a comprehensive lymphedema management in the breast cancer program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia encompassing education, lymphedema prevention, and, in the future, potential treatment of patients with lymphedema who have not responded to decongestive therapy, which involves wrapping of the limb and specialized massage for drainage.

The LYMPHA pilot study seeks to enroll 10 patients with confirmed nodal metastases whose veins are suitable for the bypass.

The next step would be a multicenter trial throughout the U.S. to confirm the efficacy of the LYMPHA procedure. Eventually it could become the standard of care for cancer patients needing ALND. The lymphatic-venous bypass could also potentially be used to treat patients with lymphedema that is not well controlled with decongestive therapy. The earlier treatment begins, the more likely the condition is to be reversible.

Says Dr. Feldman, “We can now help patients maintain a normal quality of life by most effectively preventing and treating lymphedema without compromising their cancer treatment. We never want to let quality of life trump the cancer treatment. We want both—we don’t want people to experience lymphedema.”

To be considered for the study, breast cancer patients needing lymph node dissection should contact Amiya Vaz at 212-305-1317 or by email at: av2454(at)columbia(dot)edu.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, based in New York City, is one of the nation’s largest and most comprehensive hospitals, with 2,589 beds. In 2012, the Hospital had nearly 2 million inpatient and outpatient visits, including 12,758 deliveries and 215,946 visits to its emergency departments. NewYork-Presbyterian’s 6,144 affiliated physicians and 20,154 staff provide state-of-the-art inpatient, ambulatory and preventive care in all areas of medicine at six major centers: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, NewYork-Presbyterian/The Allen Hospital, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Westchester Division and NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. One of the most comprehensive health care institutions in the world, the Hospital is committed to excellence in patient care, research, education and community service. NewYork-Presbyterian is the #1 hospital in the New York metropolitan area and is consistently ranked among the best academic medical institutions in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. The Hospital has academic affiliations with two of the nation’s leading medical colleges: Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. For more information, visit http://www.nyp.org.

Columbia University Medical Center
Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, preclinical, and clinical research; medical and health sciences education; and patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York City and State and one of the largest faculty medical practices in the Northeast. For more information, visit cumc.columbia.edu or columbiadoctors.org.

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
The Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center encompasses pre-clinical and clinical research, treatment, prevention, and population-based education efforts in cancer. The Cancer Center was initially funded by the National Cancer Institute in 1972 and became an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in 1979. Cancer Center researchers and physicians are dedicated to understanding the biology of cancer and to applying that knowledge to the design of cancer therapies and prevention strategies that reduce its incidence and progression and improve the quality of life of those affected by cancer. For more information, visit http://www.hiccc.columbia.edu.

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