Navigation Links
Injectable Antibiotic Protects Against Lyme Disease in Mice
Date:4/4/2008

Study raises prospect of new treatment for tick-borne diseases in people

FRIDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- One injection of a long-acting version of the antibiotic doxycycline appears to protect mice from developing the tick-borne illnesses Lyme disease or anaplasmosis, new animal research reveals.

The finding -- not yet replicated in people -- raises hope for developing a safer and more effective way to combat transmission of both diseases among humans.

"We're the first to show that you can use a sustained-release formulation of this antibiotic to completely inhibit both infections when transmitted simultaneously by ticks," said study author Dr. Nordin Zeidner, chief of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vector-Host Laboratory, in Fort Collins, Colo.

Zeidner stressed, however, that the treatment shouldn't be thought of as a vaccine for either disease but rather as a potentially novel method to inhibit infection following exposure.

"But this is, nevertheless, an important proof of concept," he added, "because we know that a lot of ticks infected with Lyme disease also carry this co-infection."

The study was published in the April issue of the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States, with approximately 20,000 new cases diagnosed in 2006, according to the CDC. It's transmitted by blacklegged ticks infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The ticks are common in the upper Midwest and Northeastern regions of the United States and can also carry other diseases such as human granulocytic anaplasmosis, posing a risk for combined infections.

People infected with Lyme disease can experience flu-like fever, weakness, headache, fatigue, and skin rashes. If left untreated, the disease can spread to the joints, as well as to the heart and the nervous system. Symptoms of anaplasmosis can include fever, headache, lethargy, rashes and gastrointestinal problems, according to the CDC.

Efforts to develop a vaccine for either Lyme disease or anaplasmosis haven't met with much success. So, doctors stress prevention measures when outdoors, such as the use of insect repellants with DEET and covering up with clothing.

As for treatment, the CDC suggests that two to four weeks of repeated oral antibiotics -- such as doxycyline, amoxicillin, and cefuroxime axetil -- can effectively treat most patients, particularly when the infection is caught early.

But, some doctors and patient-advocacy groups have argued that chronic infections may require a much longer antibiotic regimen -- despite treatment guidelines issued in 2006 by the Infectious Disease Society of America that warned that long-term antibiotic use raises the risk for drug resistance and medical complications.

Searching for a way to address such concerns, Zeidner and his colleagues focused on the potential benefits of a single dose sustained-release version of the antibiotic doxycycline. They noted that a standard single oral dose of the drug is quickly cleared from the body (about eight hours) -- requiring continuous and repeated use. By contrast, the sustained-release version is injected and continues to circulate for approximately 19 days after delivery.

In their mice study, the researchers exposed 6-week-old female mice to ticks infected with both Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. Three days after infection, some mice were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of either oral or sustained-release injected doxycycline, while others were given just water or a non-antibiotic compound.

The results: 100 percent of the mice injected with the long-acting antibiotic were fully protected from developing either disease. Only 20 percent to 30 percent of the mice given the oral antibiotic were similarly protected, the researchers said.

"I want to emphasize, however, that this is an animal model of disease we're looking at, and this formulation is not ready to put in people tomorrow," Zeidner cautioned. "It will take some time before it's ready for the clinic."

Dr. Raphael B. Stricker, recent past president of the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, described the new research as "outstanding."

"This work is very interesting," he said, "because they've found a way to target both Lyme disease and another very significant disease that up until just four years ago wasn't even recognized. And since the current treatment could involve taking antibiotics for months at a time, a single shot like this -- giving long-term protection and maybe even treatment -- could certainly end up being preferable."

More information

For more on treating Lyme disease, visit the CDC.



SOURCES: Nordin Zeidner, DVM, Ph.D., chief, Vector-Host Laboratory, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colo.; Raphael B. Stricker, M.D., California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, and past president, International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society; April 2008 Journal of Medical Microbiology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Nanomedicine system engineered to enhance therapeutic effects of injectable drugs
2. Green Tea Boosts Antibiotics for Superbugs
3. Dont Prescribe Antibiotics for Adult Sinus Woes
4. Research could put penicillin back in battle against antibiotic resistant bugs that kill millions
5. Synthetic peptoids hold forth promise for new antibiotics
6. FDA Extends Review Timeline for Additional Indication for Antibiotic DORIBAX(TM)
7. Affinium Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. Announces Initiation of a Phase I Clinical Trial for AFN-1252, its Novel Anti-staphylococcal Antibiotic
8. Bacteria beware: MIT student invents knock-out punch for antibiotic resistance
9. Bacterial battle for survival leads to new antibiotic
10. Antibiotic Use in Dementia Patients Questioned
11. Biannual Antibiotics May Cut Major Cause of Blindness in Africa
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Injectable Antibiotic Protects Against Lyme Disease in Mice
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... ... (ONS) wanted to create a communications platform that positions them as the go-to ... and ONS reinvented their online publication as an always-on, always-fresh news, views and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... The law firm of ... is pleased to announce Westchester resident Lauren C. Enea has joined the firm as ... firm, will concentrate her practice in elder law, Medicaid planning and applications, and Wills, ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... Empower Brokerage, ... their training and leads programs. , In February, 2017, Empower Brokerage introduced their ... Performance Partners is designed to teach how to maximize their sales efforts, as ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “End Time GPS”: a dauntless and enlightened study of ... GPS” is the creation of published author, Wesley Gerboth, a World War II veteran, ... space-vehicle projects. Now, at age ninety-one, he shares the Wisdom God bestowed upon him ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... “The Adventures of Joey, The Dog ... dog who lives his life to the fullest, as God intended. “The Adventures of ... Holmgren, a mother and grandmother pursuing her passion for writing, especially about truth and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)...   The Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs ... the pharmaceutical industry has appointed Dr. Jane ... formed scientific advisory board. Dr. Chin will be ... ever medical affairs think tank within the pharmaceutical ... ACMA, please visit  www.medicalaffairsspecialist.org .  Connect with ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... FinancialBuzz.com News Commentary  ... According to new data published Arcview ... legal cannabis market is projected to continue to grow at ... the current presidential administration. The report created by Arcview,s data ... growth in this industry are the passage and subsequent implementation ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... their offering. ... pipeline is very strong with a total of 97 drug candidates. Pharma ... Sanofi are involved in the development of the IPF therapeutics. The IPF ... III stage, 15 are in Phase II stage, 12 are in Phase ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: