Navigation Links
Infusion Therapy Raises Death Risk for Some Heart Patients
Date:11/27/2007

Glucose, insulin and potassium mix spells trouble in first three days, study shows

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- An infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium, a treatment thought to help people right after they have had a heart attack, actually increases the immediate risk of heart failure and death for some patients, a new study shows.

Previous research has produced mixed results, with smaller studies supporting the use of GIK therapy, as the treatment is known, and one larger study showing no effect on the death risk 30 days after a heart attack.

However, patients with an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, a type of heart attack commonly known as STEMI that shows a particular electrical pattern, should not be given the infusion right away because that increased risk lingers for them in the first three days after diagnosis, the researchers said in a statement.

"GIK therapy increased levels of glucose, potassium, and net fluid gain post-infusion, all three of which predicted death after adjusting for multiple confounders. Adjusting for glucose, potassium, and net fluid gain eliminated the apparent increase in mortality at 3 days observed with GIK infusion, suggesting a direct association with these factors. Administration of GIK infusion within 4 hours of symptom onset yielded no benefit compared with later initiation," the authors wrote.

Their report is published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The research team, which included scientists from Argentina and Emory University in Atlanta, analyzed data from two separate trials of almost 23,000 STEMI patients. Although the researchers found no difference in outcome at 30 days and six months, when they looked at the first few days following a heart attack, they discovered an increased risk of both heart failure and death in the patients who received the infusions. In the first three days, there were 1,509 incidents of heart failure or death (15.8 percent) in the infusion group, compared with 1,388 incidents of heart failure or death (14.5 percent) in the control group.

The researchers noted that this largest-ever analysis "demonstrates that GIK infusion has no effect on any important clinical endpoint through 30 days following STEMI. However, contrary to our pre-specified hypothesis, we observed a higher rate of death and the composite of death or heart failure at 3 days in patients allocated to GIK therapy compared with control."

More information

The American Heart Association has more on heart attack treatments.



-- HealthDay News staff



SOURCE: Nov. 28, 2007, Journal of the American Medical Association


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Direct Anesthetic Infusion Helps Colorectal Cancer Patients
2. Polyanalgesic Consensus Panels New Treatment Guidelines Via Intraspinal Infusion for Severe Chronic Pain
3. Vision restoration therapy shown to improve brain activity in brain injured patients
4. HIV therapy in pregnancy-data support WHO recommendations
5. Family-based treatment more effective than supportive psychotherapy in treating bulimia
6. Trial to Test Gene Therapy for Angina in Women
7. Novel Cooling Therapy May Have Aided Injured Football Player
8. Less than one-third of women aware of landmark hormone therapy study, Stanford researcher finds
9. More than 10,000 Medicare Patients in Montana Could Be Hit by Proposed Cuts to Home Oxygen Therapy; Access to Power Wheelchairs Would Also Decrease
10. This October, the American Physical Therapy Associations National Physical Therapy Month to Focus on Nations Obesity Epidemic
11. Discovery Health CME Explores the Benefits and Risks of Aspirin in Aspirin Therapy: Maximizing the Benefits
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Infusion Therapy Raises Death Risk for Some Heart Patients
(Date:4/22/2017)... , ... April 22, 2017 ... ... of Eastern Pennsylvania has named PROSHRED® Security of Philadelphia its “Woman-Owned ... PROSHRED® Philadelphia specializes in providing information destruction , recycling, and ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... An April 10 article ... of ancient teeth, which reveal a great deal about prehistoric ice-age dental practitioners and ... may have been used to remove decayed dental matter, and that teeth were then ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Chicago plastic surgeon, Dr. Anil R. Shah, ... is a benign bony lump located on the forehead usually attributed to a facial ... sight and pain. Dr. Shah has discovered an approach that is minimally invasive. He ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Dudnyk has announced the launch of its new brand identity, ... potential of specialty and orphan brands can only be achieved when the needs and ... Effect is at the heart of a true partnership between our agency and our ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... Hong Kong (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... Printing (U3DP), the first 3D printing facility among higher education institutions in Hong Kong ... 3D printing, in terms of the range and quantity of facilities in Hong Kong. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... 19, 2017  Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... company developing new treatments for cancer and other ... its previously announced underwritten public offering of 23,625,084 ... offering price of $2.00 per share, before deducting ... payable by Sorrento.  The net proceeds to Sorrento ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... HANOVER, N.J. , April 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... (NIH) demonstrating that 58% of patients with treatment-naïve ... six months when treated with eltrombopag at the ... 1 . The study evaluated three sequential treatment ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... MINNEAPOLIS , April 18, 2017 Cogentix ... focused on providing the Urology, Uro/Gyn and Gynecology markets ... for the first quarter ended March 31, 2017 after ... The Company will host a conference call ... day on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: