Navigation Links
Individualizing Care Could Save Money, Experts Say
Date:7/12/2011

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Cost-effectiveness is becoming an increasingly important aspect of medical treatment, and two researchers have found that individualizing therapies to smaller groups of patients may be one way to help control costs.

In the new report, the team from Stanford University School of Medicine suggested that when comparing the price of a treatment with its intended outcome (also known as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio), health economists should assess smaller subgroups of people for a more precise analysis that is better tailored to individuals.

"Physicians need to think about what a particular intervention will offer for each patient, and how much it will cost," co-author Dr. John Ioannidis, chief of the Stanford Prevention Research Center and Stanford's C.F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention, said in a university news release. "What is at stake, and how might this patient's needs and expectations vary from the norm?"

An example of one way to individualize the cost-benefit analysis of medical treatments would be to consider smaller categories of people who would respond differently to certain treatments, such as people who are less willing to take on the risk of negative side effects associated with certain medications, the study authors pointed out.

"Most physicians practice medicine intuitively without giving much thought to the evidence and the economic implications of their decisions," said Ioannidis. "The information flow and decision-making process is often chaotic and not entirely rational. This is scary."

The researchers admitted individualized cost-effectiveness analysis isn't possible for population-wide treatments or when the intervention could also affect the health of many other people, such as vaccination programs.

Ioannidis and co-author Dr. Alan Garber, health economist and director of the Center for Health Policy at Stanford, published their report online July 12 in PLoS Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health provides more information on health care costs and financial assistance.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Stanford University School of Medicine, news release, July 12, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Brain tumor discovery could lead to new treatment
2. Higher daily dose of aspirin could play key role in preventing heart attacks for those with diabetes
3. Those aching joints could be in your genes
4. Could Finger Length Predict Penis Length?
5. Blocking molecular target could make more cancers treatable with PARP inhibitors
6. Van Andel Research Institute finding could lead to reduced side effects in anti-cancer antibiotics
7. International Vasospasm 2011 conference could be springboard for treatment guidelines
8. Mens Waistlines Could Be Key to Health
9. Ultrawideband could be future of medical monitoring
10. New stem cell research could aid in battle against bulging waistlines
11. More Olive Oil in Diet Could Cut Stroke Risk: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Individualizing Care Could Save Money, Experts Say
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... , ... Regenerative Medicine is being transformed by ongoing research and clinical findings ... patient results as have been achieved with Okyanos Cell Therapy are paving ... for patients worldwide. , As the Medical Advisory Chairman at Okyanos, Eric Duckers, MD, ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... choose the perfect data logger for each job, ensuring the best suited solution ... calibrations of MadgeTech data loggers at their lab in Istanbul. , Metroloji Okulu ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... American Gene Technologies ... to its board of directors. Otterstatter is co-founder, president and CEO of ... technological innovations that lead to broad-based healthcare solutions. , “Jon knows how to ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... ... WaterAid launched the #perioddrama campaign to mark Menstrual Hygiene Day on May 28 ... world who do not have access to a toilet, even when they’re on their periods. ... #perioddrama. The (sometimes hilarious) results help shine a light on the awkwardness that women face ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... patient Services To Begin In June , Aloria Health, specializing in a re-imagined, ... opening of Aloria Milwaukee, its first treatment facility for outpatient, day treatment and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... Los innovadores de COMBO[TM], ... introduce catéteres para la intervención de extremidades inferiores ... global especializada en el suministro de soluciones vasculares ... incluyendo productos para tratar la enfermedad arterial periférica. ... los dispositivos de primera entrada de la compañía ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Dutch surgeons have launched a ... the world and treat patients on a global scale. Medical professionals ... Asia and the US have already signed ... and networking in a totally secure environment. Education  ... zone working together with a surgeon at Harvard to treat a ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... PUNE, India , May 23, 2016 ... is spread across 163 pages, profiles 12 companies and ... 280 tables and figures on the industry and its ... study that is comprehensive in nature, details the current ... of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: