Navigation Links
Increasing access to antiretroviral drugs would drastically cut AIDS deaths in South Africa
Date:3/26/2008

More that 1.2 million deaths could be prevented in South Africa over the next five years by accelerating efforts to provide access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study released online today by the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Using a sophisticated mathematical model of HIV disease and treatment, a team of researchers led by Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) estimated the number of AIDS-related deaths in South Africa through 2012 under alternative ART scale-up assumptions.

The study results underscore the urgent need for Congress to reauthorize the U.S. Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which has supported the South African governments effort to increase access to antiretroviral therapy, the researchers note. If ART is not provided to all who need it, HIV mortality will be enormous, says Walensky. Deliberate, purposeful, and expedient scale-up will save millions of lives in South Africa alone.

South Africa has one of the largest burdens of HIV infection in the world, with 5 to 6 million individuals and 19 percent of adults aged 15 to 49 infected. While government programs supported by PEPFAR and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria have steadily increased access to antiretrovirals, at the end of 2006 only a third of individuals eligible for the therapy were receiving it.

In order to quantify the potential impact of various strategies for increasing access to ART, the research team projected the number of deaths under five scenarios ranging from maintaining current access levels, through steady and moderate growth levels, to rapid growth and full access for all patients requiring treatment. Among other factors, calculations were based on the fact that the one-year survival rate for eligible patients who receive antiretroviral therapy is 94 percent, while only 55 percent of those not treated would be expected to survive one year.

Results showed that maintaining current treatment capacity would lead to 2.4 million AIDS-related deaths by 2012. Rapid scale-up, whereby everyone in need would have access by 2011, would reduce the projected number of deaths to 1.2 million during that time period, and immediate full access for all eligible patients would drop deaths to 800,000.

The researchers note that efforts to scale up treatment have resulted in a fivefold increase in access to ART in low and moderate-income countries. Continued investments in antiretroviral treatment programs worldwide are a public health imperative; the potential loss of life without such support is simply unacceptable, says Walensky, who is an associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Alimera Sciences Closes $30 Million in Series C Financing, Increasing Stake in Medidur(TM) FA
2. Although Remicade and Humira Are Being Increasingly Prescribed for Crohns Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, Insurers Are Subjecting Both Drugs to Multiple Cost-Control Strategies
3. Nanoemulsion vaccines show increasing promise
4. Small-Diameter Dental Implants Increasingly Popular In the US
5. AMA Foundation Honors Memphis, Tennessee Physician for Increasing Access to Health Care in the U.S.
6. AMA Foundation Honors Canton, Ohio Physician for Increasing Access to Health Care in the U.S.
7. AMA Foundation Honors Atlanta Physician for Increasing Access to Health Care in the U.S.
8. Congenital heart defects increasing among IVF twins
9. Workplace opportunities and stresses are both increasing
10. Generic Prescription Drugs Show Increasingly Greater Use in Southeastern Pennsylvania
11. Kidney Disease Increasing in U.S.
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Everybody has their own ... others prefer to read it, and some people don't like it at all. FindaTopDoc ... what they found: , Erotic literature can give readers a taste of their deepest, ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Ensuring meat products have ... highlight the importance of correctly using a meat thermometer. The videos feature University ... research on consumer food safety habits. Dr. Bruhn explains the variety of meat ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... West Palm Beach, FL (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... ... June 19, in Pinecrest, Florida. This is MD Now’s 28th facility overall and marks ... 12301 S. Dixie Highway, located one mile North of The Falls shopping mall. The ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... American Farmer, ... winning series, which is slated to air fourth quarter 2017. American Farmer airs Tuesdays ... Hansen, a Danish pharmacist, founded Chr. Hansen in Denmark in 1874 after a ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... Jusino Insurance Services, a locally owned ... greater Chicago metropolitan area, is embarking on a charity drive in conjunction with ... Founded in 1897, Hephzibah Children’s Association is one of the oldest social services ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/2/2017)...  NxStage Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq:  NXTM), a leading medical technology company ... demonstrating positive biochemical outcomes related to more frequent hemodialysis ... will be presented at the ERA-EDTA Congress being held ... . The research was conducted by ... Europe (KIHDNEy) Cohort team ...
(Date:5/30/2017)... TEL AVIV, Israel , May 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... clinical stage pharmaceutical Company specializing in the development ... management will present a company overview at three ... The 7th Annual LD Micro Invitational: ... Date:                     ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... 2017  ivWatch LLC today announced the launch ... to enable seamless integration of ivWatch,s groundbreaking IV ... pumps and other devices. By integrating ivWatch technology ... help health care customers deliver a higher level ... IV therapy. "The ivWatch OEM Board ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: