Navigation Links
Increased nearsightedness linked to higher education levels and more years spent in school
Date:6/26/2014

German researchers have found strong evidence that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia. Published online this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the research is the first population-based study to demonstrate that environmental factors may outweigh genetics in the development of myopia.

While common, nearsightedness has become even more prevalent around the world in recent years and presents a growing global health and economic concern. Severe nearsightedness is a major cause of visual impairment and is associated with greater risk of retinal detachment, myopic macular degeneration, premature cataracts and glaucoma. In the United States, nearsightedness now affects roughly 42 percent of the population. [1] Developed Asian countries report increasing myopia rates of up to 80 percent, the rapid growth rate of which suggests that environmental factors play a significant role. [2] Environmental factors that have been linked to myopia include near work (such as reading or using a computer), outdoor activity, living in urban versus rural areas and education.

To further analyze the association between myopia development and education, researchers at the University Medical Center in Mainz, Germany examined nearsightedness in 4,658 Germans ages 35 to 74, excluding anyone with cataracts or who had undergone refractive surgery. Results of their work, known as the Gutenberg Health Study, show that myopia appeared to become more prevalent as education level increased:

  • 24 percent with no high school education or other training were nearsighted
  • 35 percent of high school graduates and vocational school graduates were nearsighted
  • 53 percent of university graduates were nearsighted

In addition to education levels completed, the researchers also found that people who spent more years in school proved to be more myopic, with nearsightedness worsening for each year of school. Furthermore, the researchers looked at the effect of 45 genetic markers, but found it a much weaker factor in the degree of nearsightedness compared to education level.

The antidote to the rise in myopia could be as simple as going outside more often. In the last several years, studies of children and young adults in Denmark and Asia show that more time outdoors and exposure to daylight is associated with less nearsightedness. [3]

"Since students appear to be at a higher risk of nearsightedness, it makes sense to encourage them to spend more time outdoors as a precaution," said Alireza Mirshahi, M.D., lead author of the study.


'/>"/>

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
415-561-8534
American Academy of Ophthalmology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Menthol cigarettes linked to increased smoking among teens
2. Study links evening blue light exposure to increased hunger
3. Some high blood pressure drugs may be associated with increased risk of vision-threatening disease
4. Calcium supplements not associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in women
5. GW researcher discovers the mechanisms that link brain alertness and increased heart rate
6. Early obesity linked to increased probability of severe obesity later in life
7. Study finds increased employee flexibility, supervisor support offer wide-ranging benefits
8. Oral Cancer linked to human papillomavirus: No increased HPV risk for long-term partners
9. Study confirms increased prevalence of GI symptoms among children with autism
10. Study links severe sleep apnea to increased risk of stroke, cancer and death
11. Increased risk of developing lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ARI Network Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARIS) announced today ... websites for its network of more than 650 U.S.-based dealers. Rhino, a member of ... rotary and flail mowers and cutters, rear blades, post hole diggers, pasture renovators, tillers, ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , ... March 30, 2017 , ... CHARM CITY RUN ... Run has announced that Mercy Medical Center will serve as the official title sponsor ... region. On Sunday, June 25, 2017, thousands of women will walk or run the ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... AngioGenesis Labs sold 300 bottles ... AngioGenesis Labs, makers of HeartBoost, BrainBest and BeautyBest, achieved these results while doing ... an over the counter heart healthy drink, can reduce Arterial Plaque, Lower Blood ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... as it continues developing an ANSI-approved, consensus-based American National Standard for Good ... to publish the first ANSI-approved GMP standard for dietary supplements this spring, ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... HealthCareMandA.com will host an important ... 2017, at 1:00 PM ET. A recording of the webinar will also be made ... , Home health and hospice companies are still popular targets for healthcare investors. This ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017   Dynatronics Corporation (NASDAQ: ... of Cynthia L. McHenry (Cyndi) as ... for leading Dynatronics manufacturing, distribution, and purchasing operations ... Dynatronics, CEO Kelvyn H. Cullimore, Jr. ... search process conducted by the company as it ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 29, 2017 On March 28, the U.S. Food and ... with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and primary ... approved by the FDA for PPMS. Ocrevus is an ... "Multiple sclerosis can have a profound impact ... M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - Medicure Inc. ... release financial results for the year ended December ... 26, 2017. The results are being released later ... financial statements will include the operations and balances ... 1, 2016.  This release and filing date meets ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: