Navigation Links
In Men, Duration of Diabetes Linked to Raised Heart Risk
Date:3/14/2011

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- When a man develops type 2 diabetes could determine his risk of a heart attack, a new study finds.

In fact, men who have had type 2 diabetes for a decade or more face the same risk as those who have already had a prior heart attack, the researchers found.

The findings, appearing this week in the March 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, may help to stratify patients based on risk level, to better determine who needs what type of care and when.

"You don't want to give all these big, powerful, expensive medicines to every single person. Maybe we can tease out the group that would benefit more," said Dr. Robert Scott III, an associate professor of internal medicine at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine and senior staff cardiologist at Scott & White in Temple, Texas. He was not involved in the new study.

Prior research had indicated that the risk of heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes was the same as in people who had had a previous heart attack. But this research indicates that the risk really does have more to do with timing.

After following about 4,000 men aged 60 to 79 for nine years, British researchers led by S. Goya Wannamethee of University College London, found a higher risk of heart attacks and death in all those who had diabetes, compared to men who didn't have the illness.

Risk rose along with duration of disease -- compared to men without diabetes, men who had early-onset diabetes (in this case, for an average of 17 years or more) had 2.5 times the risk of a heart attack. That level of risk was equal to that of men with a prior history of heart attack, the team noted.

Men who had late-onset diabetes (an average of five years with the disease) had a 54 percent increased risk of a heart attack or of dying.

The risk for cardiovascular problems rose significantly after a man had had diabetes for eight years, the team found.

None of these risk differences were affected by more typical risk factors for heart attack, such as inflammation of the arteries.

"The bottom line was that men who had had diabetes longer, in other words early-onset diabetes diagnosed [in this study] before age 60, had more heart attacks and more events," Scott said. "And therefore they truly did look equivalent to patients who had had a prior heart attack and no diabetes. It looks like it really was an equivalent," he added.

"If a male aged 60 walks into my office who just got diagnosed yesterday and didn't have any known heart disease, I might not be as aggressive [in treating him] as we are today," he noted. "That way the patient has less side effects to the medicine and less cost."

But another expert said that clinical implications from the new study remain unclear.

Dr. Chad Teeters, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said that one problem with the study was that the patients were all older, many had heart risk factors known as "metabolic syndrome," and many were physically inactive, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

Given this limitation, he said, the new research "doesn't change the game" of how patients are treated.

The study didn't look at men under the age of 60, but the authors did note that people are now getting diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at earlier and earlier ages, perhaps indicating more people who are in need of more aggressive treatment.

And what about the heart risks posed to women by diabetes?

According to Teeters, "Cardiac risk in women doesn't begin to accumulate until later in life due to the protective effects of estrogen, so the effect of duration of diabetes may or may not be similarly associated with cardiac risk in women as it is in men."

Another expert agreed.

"Studies have shown that diabetes is more of a risk factor for heart attacks in men, [but] we don't know anything about [women's risk] from this study," noted Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "I don't think this gives us any information on women."

More information

There's more on connections between heart disease and diabetes at the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Chad Teeters, M.D., assistant professor, clinical medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, N.Y.; Suzanne Steinbaum, M.D., preventive cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Robert Scott III, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor, internal medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and senior staff cardiologist, Scott & White, Temple; March 14, 2011, Archives of Internal Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Postpartum intervention/support prevents smoking relapse, extends breastfeeding duration
2. Short nighttime sleep duration among infants, young children associated with obesity in later life
3. Study finds an increased risk of death in men with insomnia and a short sleep duration
4. Study links shorter sleep durations with greater risks of mental distress in young adults
5. Short and long sleep durations are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease
6. First-time parents daily sleep duration predicts their relationship satisfaction
7. Southeastern States Mired in the Diabetes Belt: CDC Report
8. Diabetes Often Not Diagnosed or Treated Properly
9. Diabetes Ups Death Risk Overall, Study Shows
10. Potassium levels possible key to racial disparity in Type 2 diabetes
11. Scientists Spot Another Gene Behind Type 2 Diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
In Men, Duration of Diabetes Linked to Raised Heart Risk
(Date:6/26/2016)... North Carolina (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... release of a new product that was developed to enhance the health of felines. ... for centuries. , The two main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs ... College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. ... treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar ... M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal ... complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... A recent article published June 14 on E Online ... on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking to undergo not only ... calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, Beverly Hills Physicians (BHP) ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association (PHA) learned ... receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance research and ... by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in fighting pulmonary ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... to 2022" report to their offering. ... financial data derived from varied research sources to present unique ... on the market during the next five years, including a ... markets, regional and country level analysis. The report provides a ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Bracket , a leading clinical trial technology and ... platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) 6.0, at the 52 nd ... 2016 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.  A demonstration ... of its kind to fully integrate with RTSM, will be ... is a flexible platform for electronic clinical outcomes assessments that ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... and BOGOTA, Colombia , June 23, 2016  Astellas today announced the establishment of ... Farma Brasil as the company,s second affiliate in Latin America . ... ... Manager of Astellas Farma Colombia ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: