Navigation Links
In-Flight Clot Risk Low for Most People
Date:9/24/2007

Odds of 'economy class syndrome' are about 1 in 5,000, research shows

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recent media reports of airplane passengers developing serious blood clots in-flight, only about one in 5,000 people are at risk for these types of events, a new study finds.

This type of leg clot, called a venous thrombosis, has gotten a lot of recent attention. In fact, the condition has been nicknamed "economy class syndrome," since it's been linked to long hours of immobility during flight.

But the actual risk for the condition hasn't been known.

In this new study, European researchers calculated the risk and found that for most people, the risk for so-called "economy class syndrome" was actually very small. However, the odds of in-flight clot are higher for some groups than others, and knowing your risk is important to accurately assessing whether you should take preventive measures, the researchers said.

"People who make several flights in a short time frame, people who make very long flights, women who use oral contraceptives, people who are overweight and people who are either short or very tall are at increased risk," noted lead researcher Dr. Frits R. Rosendaal, from the department of clinical epidemiology and hematology at Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands.

Venous thromboembolism is a condition where blood clots form in the veins of the legs. The danger is that these clots can break loose and travel to the lungs, heart or brain causing a life threatening condition. These clots can develop from prolonged sitting.

In the study, Rosendaal's team collected data on almost 8,800 people who worked for international companies and traveled a lot. These individuals were followed for a total of 38,910 person-years, during which they went on more than 100,000 long-haul (more than 4 hours duration) flights.

During follow-up, 53 thromboses occurred -- 22 within eight weeks of a long-haul flight. Rosendaal's group used this data to calculate the risk of having a thrombotic event. That risk: one event per every 4,656 long-haul flights.

The researchers found that the risk increased with more flights taken during a shorter period of time. It also increased with the length of flights. The risk was particularly high for those under age 30, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight, Rosendaal said.

In addition, the risk of thromboses was highest in the first two weeks after the travel and after eight weeks post-travel, according to the report in the September issue of the online journal, PLoS Medicine.

Rosendaal noted that although the risk to individuals is very small, some people are taking precautions that he called "over the top."

"People should lighten up," he said, referring specifically to people who take aspirin before flying.

There is no evidence that blood-thinning aspirin prevents venous thrombosis, but it can cause abdominal bleeding, Rosendaal cautioned. "People shouldn't take aspirin for this -- it doesn't work," he said.

There is really no known preventive measure for economy class syndrome, Rosendaal said. The best advice is to move your legs and feet. There is no proof that elastic stockings and leg bands work, either, he noted.

Taking the blood thinner heparin will prevent venous thrombosis, too. But it can trigger bleeding and that risk outweighs its small benefit in preventing an in-flight venous thrombosis, Rosendaal said.

"The only thing that makes sense is to move your feet," he said.

One expert believes the risk of venous thrombosis from air travel is tiny compared with more common causes.

"This large, rigorously-conducted study was carried out by one of the world's top clinical research groups in venous thromboembolism," said Dr. Samuel Z. Goldhaber, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Venous Thromboembolism Research Group at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

The risk of about one in 5,000 long-haul flights "is a tiny risk compared with the risk of venous thromboembolism from obesity, severe medical illness, cancer, or surgery," he said.

"More emphasis is required to prevent venous thromboembolism that occurs under everyday circumstances," Goldhaber said. "A heart-healthy lifestyle, emphasizing ideal body weight, sound nutrition, and daily exercise is a good way to start," he said.

More information

To learn more about venous thrombosis, visit NASA Occupational Health.



SOURCES: Frits R. Rosendaal, M.D., Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center, Clinical Epidemiology and Hematology, The Netherlands; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, M.D., professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, director, Venous Thromboembolism Research Group, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston; Sept. 24, 2007, PLoS Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Bad News for Short People
2. New hope on the Horizon for People Wishing to Quit Smoking
3. Antioxidants protect health tissue in people undergoing radiation therapy.
4. Skinny people need to exercise too
5. People who fight wars may be at high risk of cardiovascular disease
6. People suffering from Alzheimer’s: can they take decisions about their treatment
7. Democracy Not To Be Forced On People
8. Prescription Drug - Helps People Stop Smoking
9. Hormone treatment helps obese people slim down
10. Safe for people with asthma
11. More People Seeking Treatment for Depression
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can now turn to Dr. Jessica Scruggs ... for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey brings specialization to include Mohs surgery, ... Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under the direction of Glenn Goldstein, MD, ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... First Choice Emergency ... named Dr. Sesan Ogunleye, as the Medical Director of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm facility. ... Director of our new Mesquite location,” said Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical Director ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the ... to iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The ... Health & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex set ... drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and suffering, ... traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from depression, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants to support ... as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 The Academy of ... recommendations that would allow biopharmaceutical companies to ... entities that make formulary and coverage decisions, a move ... of new medicines. The recommendations address restrictions ... appear on the drug label, a prohibition that hinders ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... and SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. , June 24, ... -based mobile pulmonary function testing company, is now able to perform ... developed by ndd Medical Technologies , Inc. ... in hospital-based labs.  Thanks to ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ARL ... can get any needed testing done in the comfort of her ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... According to a new market ... Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle Length (4mm, 5mm, 6mm, ... of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - Trends & Global Forecasts ... market for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. ... by 2021 from USD 1.65 Billion in 2016, growing ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: