Navigation Links
ICU May Not Be Needed After Sleep Apnea Surgery

MONDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- After undergoing surgery for obstructive sleep apnea, patients require close monitoring but may not need to be in an intensive care unit, according to a new study.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder in which a person experiences abnormal pauses in breathing while they sleep. Sleep apnea can put people at risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart problems.

Treatments include losing weight and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices, although some people may need surgery.

The surgery itself carries risks, however, the experts note. These include post-operative breathing difficulties, so patients are often placed in ICUs afterward.

But is that always necessary? To find out, researchers at the Pacific Sleep Centre in Singapore reviewed the cases of nearly 500 sleep apnea patients who had surgery between early 2007 and mid-2010. The surgeries included nasal, palate and tongue procedures.

The overall complication rate was 7 percent, according to the study, which appears online March 19 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Patients who undergo surgery for sleep apnea will end up with small lower jaws, making airway access difficult for anesthesiologists, the researchers noted. Another risk is dangerously slowed breathing due to anesthetics such as muscle relaxants and narcotics.

While routine admission to the ICU may not be necessary for all patients who've just had sleep apnea surgery, all patients should be closely monitored in the recovery or high-dependency area (one step below intensive care) for at least 3 hours after surgery, the researchers suggested.

"In conclusion, we strongly recommended that the clinician manage the patient with OSA [obstructive sleep apnea] with caution and prudence, with the understanding that these patients have a higher risk of airway compromise and respiratory depression intraoperatively and postoperatively," they wrote.

Dr. Lisa Liberatore, an ear, nose and throat specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said sleep apnea patients often have other medical issues that may raise surgical risks.

Because of the risks, surgeons should proceed with caution and patients should first try other, non-surgical treatments, she said.

"I recommend that the patient use CPAP first and lose at least 20 to 30 pounds before doing any surgery," Liberatore said.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sleep apnea treatment.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Lisa Liberatore, MD, ear, nose and throat specialist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 19, 2012

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Panel of serum biomarkers may reduce number of lung biopsies needed
2. More effective treatments urgently needed for adolescent depression
3. Second Breast Cancer Surgery Sometimes Needed
4. Strategic research plan needed to help avoid potential risks of nanomaterials
5. Less blood needed post-surgery, says NEJM study
6. Study Finds Fewer Blood Transfusions Needed After Hip Surgeries
7. New report identifies research needed on modified risk tobacco products
8. Study favors as-needed treatment over maintenance therapy for patients with follicular lymphoma
9. Yawning May Cool the Brain When Needed
10. Evidence points to potential roles for cognitive rehabilitation therapy in treating traumatic brain injury, but further research needed
11. Greater support is needed to tackle the serious emotional consequences of whistleblowing
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The International Association ... standards of excellence for the field of eating disorders, announces the opening of ... 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ChampionsGate. , ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Many families have long-term insurance ... care insurance companies have a waiver for care if the client has a cognitive ... the family pays for care, is often waived, so the benefits from their insurance ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Talented ... the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," which is ... events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. , ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million ... by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... a leader in post-acute health care, have expanded their existing home health joint ... Health. , AccentCare has been operating a joint venture home health company with ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/25/2017)... 2017   Montrium , an industry leader ... the IQPC Trial Master Files & Inspection Readiness ... EastHORN Clinical Services has selected eTMF Connect ... management. EastHORN, a leading European contract research organization ... transparency to enable greater collaboration with sponsors, improve ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... Sept. 22, 2017  As the latest Obamacare repeal ... Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Lindsey Graham ... the medical device industry is in an odd place. ... the 2.3% excise tax on medical device sales passed ... want covered patients, increased visits and hospital customers with ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Sept. 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ., a recognized ... announced that it has been ranked #1 by its users ... Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized as the ... hospitals and medical centers over 200 beds and holds one ... technology user survey history. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: