Navigation Links
IBM Research Aims to Build Nanoscale DNA Sequencer to Help Drive Down Cost of Personalized Genetic Analysis
Date:10/6/2009

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- In an effort to build a nanoscale DNA sequencer, IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists are drilling nano-sized holes in computer-like chips and passing DNA strands through them in order to read the information contained within their genetic code.

View video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKi30ai35mU

View animation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvclP3GySUY

For an ongoing conversation on this research project, visit the Smarter Planet blog: http://asmarterplanet.com/blog/2009/10/dna-transistor.html

(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20091006/NY87582 )

(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090416/IBMLOGO )

This advanced research effort to demonstrate a silicon-based "DNA Transistor" could help pave the way to read human DNA easily and quickly, generating advancements in health condition diagnosis and treatment. The challenge in the effort is to slow and control the motion of the DNA through the hole so the reader can accurately decode what is in the DNA. If successful, the project could improve throughput and reduce cost to achieve the vision of personalized genome analysis at a cost of $100 to $1,000. In comparison, the first sequencing ever done by the Human Genome Project (HGP) cost nearly $3 billion.

Having access to an individual's personal genetic code could advance personalized medicine by using genomic and molecular data to facilitate the discovery and clinical testing of new products, and help determine a person's predisposition to a particular disease or condition.

A team of IBM scientists from four fields - nanofabrication, microelectronics, physics and biology -- are converging to master the technique that threads a long DNA molecule through a three nanometer wide hole, known as a nanopore, in a silicon chip. A nanometer is one one-billionth of a meter or about 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. As the molecule is passed through the nanopore, it is ratcheted one unit of DNA at a time, as an electrical sensor "reads" the DNA. This sensor that identifies the genetic information is the subject of intense ongoing research. The information gathered from the reader could be used to gain a better understanding of an individual's medical makeup to help further the pursuit of personalized healthcare.

"The technologies that make reading DNA fast, cheap and widely available have the potential to revolutionize bio-medical research and herald an era of personalized medicine," said IBM Research Scientist Gustavo Stolovitzky. "Ultimately, it could improve the quality of medical care by identifying patients who will gain the greatest benefit from a particular medicine and those who are most at risk of adverse reaction."

IBM Research is working to optimize a process for controlling the rate at which a DNA strand moves through a nano-scale aperture on a thin membrane during analysis for DNA sequencing. While scientists around the world have been working on using nanopore technology to read DNA, nobody has been able to figure out how to have complete control of a DNA strand as it travels through the nanopore. Slowing the speed is critical to being able to read the DNA strand. IBM scientists believe they have a unique approach that could tackle this challenge.

To control the speed at which the DNA flows through the microprocessor nanopore, IBM researchers have developed a device consisting of a multilayer metal/dielectric nano-structure that contains the nanopore. Voltage biases between the electrically addressable metal layers will modulate the electric field inside the nanopore. This device utilizes the interaction of discrete charges along the backbone of a DNA molecule with the modulated electric field to trap DNA in the nanopore. By cyclically turning on and off these gate voltages, scientists showed theoretically and computationally, and expect to be able prove experimentally, the plausibility of moving DNA through the nanopore at a rate of one nucleotide per cycle - a rate that IBM scientists believe would make DNA readable.

A human genome sequencing capability affordable for individuals is the ultimate goal of the DNA sequencing and is commonly referred to as "$1,000 genome."

In the Fall of 2005, IBM revised its corporate privacy and equal opportunity policies to reflect the corporation's intention to handle information about an employee's genetics with a high regard for its privacy, and also to refrain from using genetic test information to discriminate against a person in the employment context. At that time, IBM was arguably the first company in the world to restrict genetic data from being used to make employment-related decisions.

On May 21, 2008, the United States signed into law the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) that protects Americans against discrimination based on their genetic information when it comes to health insurance and employment. The bill passed the Senate unanimously and the House by a vote of 414 to 1. The long-awaited measure, which has been debated in Congress for 13 years, is helping to pave the way for people to take full advantage of the promise of personalized medicine without fear of discrimination.

    CONTACT:
    Michael Loughran
    IBM
    914.945.1613
    mloughra@us.ibm.com

SOURCE IBM


'/>"/>
SOURCE IBM
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
5. New research shows how chronic stress worsens neurodegenerative disease course
6. New research explores newborn in-hospital weight loss
7. Research may unlock mystery of autisms origin in the brain
8. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
9. HIVs impact in Zimbabwe explored in new research
10. U.S. Research Funding Continues to Flatten as U.S. Health Costs Climb - in August 31 Science
11. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... Intellitec Solutions announced the publication of a case study ... solution that integrates to their PointClickCare EHR software package. With the guidance of ... now has the capability to achieve its goal for a comprehensive EHR solution, ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Semrock’s highly popular SearchLight ... online modeling resource for fluorescence microscopists and optical system designers, enabling The Right ... years spanning the globe, SearchLight has become a tremendously popular tool for the ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2017 , ... Healthcare companies ... But they will rapidly reject an outdated healthcare executive resume. , “If you’re a ... at your executive resume and wondering if it’s as ready as you are for ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... SyncDog, ... sponsorship at MobileIron Live! 2017 in Santa Clara, California. Each year, ... educational approach to helping organizations maximize the benefits of mobility in their operations ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... Plastic Surgery Associates is excited to ... to present at the upcoming Aesthetic Meeting. Held in San Diego, at the San ... and Canales will lend their expertise to the Premier Global Hot Topics session, speaking ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... Corporation (TSX: CRH) (NYSE MKT: CRHM) (the "Company"), announces that it will ... at the Sheraton Hotel in Toronto, Ontario . ... Company is scheduled to present on Tuesday, May 2 at 10:00 ... of the Board, Tony Holler will also attend the ... For more details about ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... April 19, 2017 Global Prostate Cancer ... on the prostate cancer therapeutics market analyzes the ... Increasing prevalence of prostate cancer, launch of promising ... development of new drugs & therapeutic biological products, ... due to lesser side effects are some of ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... BOSTON , April 19, 2017  New research provides ... with advanced Parkinson,s, according to a study released today that ... 69th Annual Meeting in Boston , ... comes to the treatment of Parkinson,s disease, the oral drug ... of life and longevity. But as the disease progresses, the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: