Navigation Links
Hurried doctor visits may leave patients feeling forgetful
Date:6/25/2008

Have you ever been whisked through a doctor's visit, and afterward were unable to remember what the doctor said? A University of Rochester Medical Center study disclosed that doctors don't often take the steps necessary to help patients recall medical instructions.

The study, published online in this month's Journal of General Internal Medicine, investigated how frequently physicians repeat themselves, write down information, summarize instructions or take other steps to help patients remember the doctor's advice. The results suggest that doctors do not use these tools effectively or consistently. In fact, not one of the 49 doctors who took part in the study summarized their treatment recommendations.

"It's common for patients to forget half of what they're told in a medical visit," said the study's lead author, Jordan Silberman, a second-year University of Rochester medical student. "Obviously, this is cause for concern. As noted by the British researcher Philip Ley, 'if the patient cannot remember what he is supposed to do, he is extremely unlikely to do it.' No matter how effective a treatment is, it can be rendered useless by poor recall."

Researchers sent unannounced standardized patients (actors trained for this study) into primary care physician practices across Rochester, N.Y., with hidden recording devices. The actors complained of typical heartburn symptoms. Researchers then coded the recordings to determine how often doctors reinforced their instructions in some way.

Only about a third of the physicians wrote down instructions for patients. About half of the physicians repeated their recommendations, but some only repeated about 10 percent of the information.

Very few of the doctors made sure the patient understood by asking him or her to repeat it back to the doctor a technique cited in research literature as one of the best ways to help patients recall medical advice. For example, Silberman said, the doctor might say, "We've talked about a lot of things today and I want to make sure you understand everything. Can you explain to me what you're going to do when you get home?"

Lack of time may be the biggest obstacle for doctors, researchers believe. The next step is to develop a new approach to improve patient recall that can be applied in today's busy practices, and then to study the techniques in the context of what is feasible for doctors.


'/>"/>

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-5774
University of Rochester Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UK junior doctors gaining less experience of common procedures
2. Doctors Often Miss High Blood Pressure in Kids
3. One-fourth of HIV patients believe their doctors stigmatize them
4. Annual flu shot cuts need for doctors visits, hospitalization among children
5. Teens need to see their doctors more often
6. Doctors and medical ethicist discuss whether doctors should participate in capital punishment
7. Doctors and Medical Ethicist Discuss Whether Doctors Should Participate in Capital Punishment
8. Figure Skater Peggy Fleming, HealthSaver Says: Take Pains For Back Strains, 2nd Most Common Doctor Complaint
9. Research says doctors gender may hinder early diagnosis of heart disease in women
10. South Texas Doctors Report More Severe Cases of Community Staph Super Bug Hospitalizing Children
11. Maimonides Expands Circulation of Physicians Practice Journal to Staten Island Doctors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... At its annual meeting held ... as Chairman of the National Board of Directors. Mr. McDermott succeeds former APDA Chairman, ... stated Leslie A. Chambers , APDA President and CEO. “Pat has tirelessly served ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Colorize is a web theme package created exclusively ... using Colorize's dynamic moving camera. Colorize is perfect for personal and web related videos ... with 1 to 5 focus points per scene, stage floor scene presets that are ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... for Patients with Rare Diseases, a continuing medical education (CME) event presented by ... first of its kind—and a first for ACCORD, whose mission is to provide ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... that Medicare San Luis Obispo users can expect to see in 2016. To view ... two most significant changes will directly impact many San Luis Obispo seniors who rely ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... ... February 04, 2016 , ... American Addiction Centers (AAC) ... start of Project HoldSpace. Through the partnership, the two organizations seek to tackle ... between the ages of 13 and 18. Currently focused on Ohio schools, the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... , February 5, 2016 ... market research report "Fetal (Labor & Delivery) and Neonatal ... Warmer, Incubator, Pulse Oximeter, Phototherapy/Jaundice Management Devices, CPAP, Capnograph, ... MarketsandMarkets, This report studies the global market over the ... estimated at USD 6.28 Billion in 2015 and is ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , February 4, 2016 France ... Spain , UK, and Israel ). It ... 1, 2, and 3 GD, segmented by age and sex in these ... epidemiologists. The EpiCast Report is in-depth, high quality, transparent and market-driven, providing ... France , Germany , Italy ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... Calif. , Feb. 4, 2016  Edwards Lifesciences ... patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care ... accelerated share repurchase (ASR) agreement with Morgan Stanley & ... stock.  This repurchase is part of the Company,s previously ... the Company,s common stock.  --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: