Navigation Links
Hurried doctor visits may leave patients feeling forgetful
Date:6/25/2008

Have you ever been whisked through a doctor's visit, and afterward were unable to remember what the doctor said? A University of Rochester Medical Center study disclosed that doctors don't often take the steps necessary to help patients recall medical instructions.

The study, published online in this month's Journal of General Internal Medicine, investigated how frequently physicians repeat themselves, write down information, summarize instructions or take other steps to help patients remember the doctor's advice. The results suggest that doctors do not use these tools effectively or consistently. In fact, not one of the 49 doctors who took part in the study summarized their treatment recommendations.

"It's common for patients to forget half of what they're told in a medical visit," said the study's lead author, Jordan Silberman, a second-year University of Rochester medical student. "Obviously, this is cause for concern. As noted by the British researcher Philip Ley, 'if the patient cannot remember what he is supposed to do, he is extremely unlikely to do it.' No matter how effective a treatment is, it can be rendered useless by poor recall."

Researchers sent unannounced standardized patients (actors trained for this study) into primary care physician practices across Rochester, N.Y., with hidden recording devices. The actors complained of typical heartburn symptoms. Researchers then coded the recordings to determine how often doctors reinforced their instructions in some way.

Only about a third of the physicians wrote down instructions for patients. About half of the physicians repeated their recommendations, but some only repeated about 10 percent of the information.

Very few of the doctors made sure the patient understood by asking him or her to repeat it back to the doctor a technique cited in research literature as one of the best ways to help patients recall medical advice. For example, Silberman said, the doctor might say, "We've talked about a lot of things today and I want to make sure you understand everything. Can you explain to me what you're going to do when you get home?"

Lack of time may be the biggest obstacle for doctors, researchers believe. The next step is to develop a new approach to improve patient recall that can be applied in today's busy practices, and then to study the techniques in the context of what is feasible for doctors.


'/>"/>

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-5774
University of Rochester Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UK junior doctors gaining less experience of common procedures
2. Doctors Often Miss High Blood Pressure in Kids
3. One-fourth of HIV patients believe their doctors stigmatize them
4. Annual flu shot cuts need for doctors visits, hospitalization among children
5. Teens need to see their doctors more often
6. Doctors and medical ethicist discuss whether doctors should participate in capital punishment
7. Doctors and Medical Ethicist Discuss Whether Doctors Should Participate in Capital Punishment
8. Figure Skater Peggy Fleming, HealthSaver Says: Take Pains For Back Strains, 2nd Most Common Doctor Complaint
9. Research says doctors gender may hinder early diagnosis of heart disease in women
10. South Texas Doctors Report More Severe Cases of Community Staph Super Bug Hospitalizing Children
11. Maimonides Expands Circulation of Physicians Practice Journal to Staten Island Doctors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... ... Gout is like no other joint pain. It strikes suddenly, like flicking on ... redness. It is triggered by the crystallization of uric acid within the joints. It ... to the February 2016 issue of Harvard Men's Health Watch. , The large joint ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Carefree, AZ (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... coach in new book , Pioneering book "Better with Age: The Ultimate Guide to ... neuroplasticity can improve memory. The book’s publication date is March 16, 2016. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... FL 32224, February 26th: Amateur & Professional Divisions - Time: 7:00pm – ... – 10:00pm | Ticket Prices $30, Social Media: http://www.USPoleSportsFed.org , Facebook: ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... ... A new leadership team for Mid-South Youth Camp, operated by Freed-Hardeman University, will ... night, Feb. 8, prior to the evening session of the university’s 80th Annual Bible ... Camp, has been named director. Gayle McDonald, currently the assistant director of MSYC, will ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... ... It’s that time of year when most people have forgotten all about their New ... (IAAM), Hall of Fame athlete and Garrison Forest School athletic director since 2005, knows ... of her first decisions when her IAAM two-year presidency began last July was to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... -- Resolve Therapeutics, LLC, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company ... of lupus and Sjogrens syndrome, today announced the ... in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with ... --> Data from a multicenter ... RSLV-132 in 32 subjects with SLE demonstrate the ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... HILLS, Calif. , Feb. 10, 2016  Rich ... "Company") today announced a 1-for-100 reverse split of its ... the opening of trading on Thursday, February 11, 2016. ... basis under new CUSIP number 76303T308 and temporary ticker ... will commence trading under the ticker symbol (RCHA).  ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... MEMPHIS, Tenn. , Feb. 10, 2016 ... School of Nursing received an in-kind ... of a VeinViewer® Vision vein finder ... donation will help students as they learn ... blood, combining technology with traditional technique. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: