Navigation Links
Human aging gene found in flies

Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) have found a fast and effective way to investigate important aspects of human ageing. Working at the University of Oxford and The Open University, Dr Lynne Cox and Dr Robert Saunders have discovered a gene in fruit flies that means flies can now be used to study the effects ageing has on DNA. In new work published today in the journal Aging Cell, the researchers demonstrate the value of this model in helping us to understand the ageing process. This exciting study demonstrates that fruit flies can be used to study critical aspects of human ageing at cellular, genetic and biochemical levels.

Dr Lynne Cox from the University of Oxford said: We study a premature human ageing disease called Werner syndrome to help us understand normal ageing. The key to this disease is that changes in a single gene (called WRN) mean that patients age very quickly. Scientists have made great progress in working out what this gene does in the test tube, but until now we havent been able to investigate the gene to look at its effect on development and the whole body. By working on this gene in fruit flies, we can model human ageing in a powerful experimental system.

Dr Robert Saunders from The Open University added: This work shows for the first time that we can use the short-lived fruit fly to investigate the function of an important human ageing gene. We have opened up the exciting possibility of using this model system to analyse the way that such genes work in a whole organism, not just in single cells.

Dr Saunders, Dr Cox and colleagues have identified the fruit fly equivalent of the key human ageing gene known as WRN. They find that flies with damage to this gene share important features with people suffering from the rapid ageing condition Werner syndrome, who also have damage to the WRN gene. In particular, the DNA, or genetic blueprint, is unstable in the flies that have the damaged version of the gene and the chromosomes are often altered. The researchers show that the flys DNA becomes rearranged, with genes being swapped between chromosomes. In patients with Werner syndrome, this genome instability leads to cancer. Cells derived from Werner syndrome patients are extremely sensitive to a drug often used to treat cancers: the researchers show that the flies that have the damaged gene are killed by even very low doses of the drug.

Professor Nigel Brown, Director of Science and Technology, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council said: The ageing population presents a major research challenge to the UK and we need effort to understand normal ageing and the characteristics that accompany it.

Fruit flies are already used as a model for the genetics behind mechanisms that underlie normal functioning of the human body and it is great news that this powerful research tool can be applied to such an important area of study into human health.


Contact: Nancy Mendoza
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Related medicine news :

1. Embryonic Stem Cells Repair Human Heart
2. Embryonic Human Stem Cells May Help Repair Heart Muscle, Lab Study Shows
3. Human Papilloma Virus vaccines may decrease chances of oral cancer
4. Investigational Agent Targeting Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptors Demonstrates Antipsychotic Activity in Humans, Study in Nature Medicine Finds
5. MassMutual Promotes Debra Palermino to Senior Vice President of Human Resources
6. Toddler Study Proves Humans Outsmart Apes
7. Human C-reactive protein regulates myeloma tumor cell growth and survival
8. Altered expression of ultraconserved noncoding RNAs linked to human leukemias and carcinomas
9. AtriCure Reports First Human Implant of the Cosgrove-Gillinov Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion System
10. New class of RNA molecules may be important in human cancer
11. The Humana Foundation and Libraries for the Future Launch Health Literacy Pilot in Atlanta
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... Denver, CO (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... U.S. cities are not changing the way that they are handling security in light ... increasing police and security presence in an attempt to stop an attack from reaching ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... A team of Swiss doctors has released a report on mesothelioma relapse and ... findings on the website. Click here to read the details now. ... were treated with chemotherapy followed by EPP surgery. Among the 106 patients who relapsed, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... "When I was traveling, I ... Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases simply from sitting on such dirty toilet ... protected from germs." , He developed the patent-pending QUDRATECS to eliminate the need ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The print ... USA Today in Atlanta, Dallas, New York, Minneapolis, South Florida, with a circulation ... is distributed nationally, through a vast social media strategy and across a network ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the world, ... Table 1-1 ). More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – ... according to WHO's first global estimates of HSV-1 infection . , "The data shocks ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/29/2015)... 2015  The GE Health Cloud 1 was unveiled ... North America (RSNA) meeting in ... the new cloud ecosystem and its applications will connect radiologists ... and multidisciplinary teams – both inside and outside the hospital ... of GE. "As the digital industrial leader, we are betting ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... November 27, 2015 --> ... to go online. The potential to save costs, improve ... and far from fully exploited as yet. Here, particular ... records, either via mobile tablet or directly at the ... ) -->      (Photo: ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ) ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation Review, Competitive ... offering. --> ) has ... Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier Shares ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: