Navigation Links
Hospital-diagnosed maternal infections linked to increased autism risk
Date:12/23/2013

Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in children, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

The research contributes new evidence to a body of scientific literature on the role of infection in autism risk and points to areas for further examination.

The study included 407 children with autism and 2,075 matched children who did not have autism. The study included infants born between January 1995 and June 1999 who remained members of the Kaiser Permanente health plan for at least two years following birth.

"Though infections in pregnant women are fairly common, in this study most were not associated with an increased risk of autism," said Lisa A. Croen, PhD, research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research and senior author of the study. "Only bacterial infections diagnosed in the hospital were associated with an increased risk."

"Infections diagnosed in a hospital setting were more common among mothers of children who developed an ASD compared with mothers of children who did not develop an ASD," Croen further explained.

Women with bacterial infections diagnosed during a hospitalization (including of the genitals, urinary tract and amniotic fluid) had a 58 percent greater risk of having a child with an ASD. While not very common in any of the mothers studied (1.5 percent of mothers of a child with ASD vs. 0.5 percent of mothers of a child without ASD), infections diagnosed during a hospitalization in the second trimester were associated with children having more than a three-fold increased risk of developing ASD.

"Infections diagnosed in an inpatient setting may represent more severe infections, and these were associated with increased risk of ASD," said Ousseny Zerbo, PhD, research fellow with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research and the study's lead author.

While the mechanism for how maternal infections may influence autism risk has not been firmly established, Zerbo said animal tests have shown that immune-system responses to infections during pregnancy may influence the neurological development of the fetus.

"Our findings indicate that although most infections during pregnancy were not associated with autism in the child, there appears to be some increased risk for autism," Zerbo said. "It would be prudent for pregnant women to contact their doctor if they suspect an infection."


'/>"/>

Contact: Joshua Weisz
jweisz@golinharris.com
202-664-9810
Kaiser Permanente
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Partnerships at Base of Tanzania’s Maternal Health and Early Child Care Text Messaging Service Successful First Year
2. Scaling up: Ecuadorian Ministry of Health mobilizes resources to improve maternal and newborn care
3. Miriam Hospital researcher awarded $2.9 million NIH grant to study impact of maternal smoking
4. How are children affected by maternal anxiety and depression?
5. Maternal smoking may impair infant immunity, causing a broad range of infections
6. Maternal and Family Health Services Receives Grant from Robert Y. Moffat Family Charitable Trust for Kiosk Prenatal Education Module
7. More Babies are Oversized as Maternal Obesity Rate Rises, Lancet Report Says
8. LA BioMed researchers find maternal smoking linked to asthma in the third generation
9. Major awards for innovative solutions to prevent infant/maternal deaths
10. Doctors Launch New Website to Support Popular iTunes App babyQ, Help Pregnant Women Worldwide Improve Maternal and Fetal Health
11. Sun Buick GMC Sponsors Hole-In-One Contest For Maternal and Family Health Services Golf Tournament
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... been previously exposed to more adverse experiences than children in the general population. ... such as abuse, neglect or other family challenges. While no fault of their ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Early detection and ... drug safety and minimize the cost of development. In this webinar, sponsored by ... cell lines and for cardiac toxicity using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). , ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh in Abilene, Texas, has published a ... does not. Yisrayl says with so many titles and names for the Creator, it’s ... with a little Scripture, backed with a lot of research, the truth is undeniable. ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Intellitec Solutions announced the ... implement a Microsoft Dynamics GP solution that integrates to their PointClickCare EHR software ... in long-term care, Brooke Grove now has the capability to achieve its goal ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... Rob Lowe is a popular actor that has been in many different ... purpose as the host of the “Informed” series. The program focuses on many important ... series focuses on thyroid cancer. , Although thyroid cancer is an uncommon type of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017 Cardiology devices segment ... projected period The Cardiology Devices segment is likely ... US$ 15 Mn in 2018 over 2017. By the end ... market valuation close to US$ 700 Mn, expanding at a ... segment dominated the Asia Pacific reprocessed ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... DALLAS , April 19, 2017  Vanderbilt University ... first patients in Nashville , Tennesse ... Lower Esophageal Sphincter Stimulation for GERD (LESS GERD) trial. ... to provide long-term reflux control by restoring normal function ... nearly 65 million people in the United ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... HANOVER, N.J. , April 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... (NIH) demonstrating that 58% of patients with treatment-naïve ... six months when treated with eltrombopag at the ... 1 . The study evaluated three sequential treatment ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: