Navigation Links
Hormonal Therapies Offer Effective Solutions for Many Adult Women With Acne

BOSTON, July 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Although acne traditionally has been considered a disease of teenagers, it is also extremely common in adult women. Studies show that acne affects more than 50 percent of women between the ages of 20-29 and more than 25 percent of women between the ages of 40-49 (1). In fact, after age 20, women are far more likely to report having acne than men. While there is no cure for acne, dermatologists are finding that hormonal therapies can help some women fight bothersome acne that occurs in adulthood.

At the American Academy of Dermatology's Summer Academy Meeting 2009 in Boston, dermatologist Bethanee J. Schlosser, M.D., Ph.D., FAAD, assistant professor of dermatology and director of the Women's Skin Health Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, discussed the most widely used hormonal therapies available for women with acne and the best candidates for this type of treatment.

Factors that contribute to the formation of acne include excess oil gland production, skin inflammation, abnormal maturation of skin cells lining the hair follicle and an increased number of the acne-causing bacteria Propionibacterium acnes. However, hormones also influence both oil gland production and the maturation of skin cells thereby contributing to the formation of acne lesions. For example, when androgens (the male hormones present in both men and women) over-stimulate the oil glands and hair follicles in the skin, hormonal acne flares can occur.

"Women over the age of 20 may experience worsening of their acne or a change in the nature of their acne. This can include increased lesions on the lower one-third of the face (including the jaw line and upper neck), pre-menstrual flares, and resistance to oral antibiotics and other traditional acne therapies," said Dr. Schlosser. "For these women, hormonal therapy in the form of combination oral contraceptives and/or anti-androgen medications, such as spironolactone, flutamide and dutasteride that work by reducing the activity of the male hormone testosterone, may provide significant benefit."

Dr. Schlosser noted that the use of hormonal therapies for acne, including combination oral contraceptives, requires careful screening of patients. For example, there are numerous contraindications (or factors that increase the risks of a particular medication) that must be considered before hormonal therapy is prescribed for treating acne. Such contraindications for combination oral contraceptives include a personal history of breast cancer, heart attack or stroke, uncontrolled high blood pressure, migraines with neurological symptoms, or abnormal vaginal bleeding, to name a few. Dermatologists will review these factors with patients to determine if hormonal acne therapy poses any potential risks for patients.

Based on a physical examination, a patient's medical history and the success or failure of previously prescribed acne treatments, dermatologists may recommend hormonal therapy to enhance the results of acne treatment in women. Hormonal therapy in the form of combination oral contraceptive pills has been shown to help treat both inflammatory acne lesions (the papules, pustules and painful nodules under the skin), and non-inflammatory acne lesions (blackheads and whiteheads). Dr. Schlosser suggests that hormonal therapy should not be used in isolation but instead recommends that combination oral contraceptives or anti-androgen medications be used in conjunction with topical retinoids for optimal results.

While there are numerous types of oral contraceptives available that can be used to treat acne in women, three combination oral contraceptive pills have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of acne. All combination oral contraceptives contain an estrogen (ethinyl estradiol for most contraceptive pills) and a progestin. The estrogen component decreases the production of testosterone and other androgens by the ovaries and decreases the amount of active testosterone in the body.

Some progestins may actually mimic the activity of testosterone on the oil gland and thereby worsen acne. Therefore, Dr. Schlosser primarily recommends oral contraceptives that contain one of the following progestins: norgestimate, desogestrel, or drospirenone, all of which demonstrate low or no risk of increasing the activity of the testosterone receptor.

"Combination oral contraceptives can be very beneficial in the treatment of acne in appropriately selected women, and several different oral contraceptives have been shown to be effective in clinical studies," said Dr. Schlosser. "But the treatment of acne with combination oral contraceptives needs to be targeted to each patient's individual needs, and patients should be monitored regularly to ensure the safety and effectiveness of their particular therapy."

Dr. Schlosser cautioned that improvement of acne with hormonal therapy does not occur overnight and requires at least three months of continuous use before a judgment about effectiveness should be made. In many cases, patients need to continue using oral contraceptives to sustain their results over time. However, some patients can stop hormonal therapy and maintain clear skin with the regular use of a topical retinoid.

"For many women with adult-onset acne, combination hormonal therapy can provide excellent results," added Dr. Schlosser. "Women who think they might be good candidates should discuss their options with their dermatologist who can offer a customized treatment regimen and continual monitoring to ensure optimal results."

To learn more about acne, visit the AcneNet section of, a Web site developed by dermatologists that provides patients with up-to-date information on the treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy), founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 16,000 physicians worldwide, the Academy is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. For more information, contact the Academy at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or

(1) Collier CN Harper JC Cantrell WC et al The prevalence of acne in adults 20 years and older. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 2008; 58: 56-59.

SOURCE American Academy of Dermatology
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Hormonal Changes and Depression: What is the Connection?
2. Hormonal dietary supplements might promote prostate cancer progression
3. Iressa shows promise for treatment of metastatic breast cancer when combined with hormonal therapy
4. Synovics Pharmaceuticals Announces Execution of Hormonal Manufacture and Supply Contract
5. Inheritance of hormonal disorder marked by excessive insulin in daughters
6. Non-Hormonal Therapies Aid Breast Cancer Patients
7. Pregnancy-related hormonal changes linked to increased risk of restless legs syndrome
8. Study expected to boost research for hearing and balance therapies
9. Stop-Smoking Therapies Have Benefits, Risks for Pregnant Women
10. New Report Provides Insight Into Developments in the Market for Anxiety and Depression Therapies
11. Effectiveness of most PTSD therapies is uncertain
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... Dr. Thomas Dunlap and Dr. Patrick Coleman , cardiologist ... Medicine at St., Joseph Health System’s Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital , co-hosted the ... ways and require time-critical intervention to avoid large area heart damage and progressive infections ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Patients at Serenity Point Recovery, a holistic ... Thanksgiving Day to share the things that they are most grateful for today. ... channel, patients displayed what they wrote on index cards, describing the things that ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 26, 2015 , ... Somu Sivaramakrishnan announced today that he ... now offers travelers, value and care based Travel Services, including exclusive pricing on ... as, cabin upgrades and special amenities such as, shore excursions, discounted fares, travel ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... PRMA Plastic Surgery is updating their ... surgeons performed their 6,000th free flap breast reconstruction surgery! , “What an accomplishment for ... excited to rebuild lives and it’s an honor to have served all of these ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... wellness consultation, has collaborated with Women’s Web – an online resource for ... topics on mental and emotional well-being relationship, life balance, stress, professional development, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , Nov. 26, 2015 ... the addition of the "2016 Future Horizons ... Monitoring (TDM) Market: Supplier Shares, Country Segment Forecasts, ... offering. --> ... comprehensive analysis of the Japanese therapeutic drug monitoring ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... the addition of the  "2016 Future ... Global Cell Surface Testing Market: Supplier ... to their offering.  --> ... of the  "2016 Future Horizons and ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... Juntendo universitetssjukhus ser potential att använda ... magnetresonansbilder (MR-bilder) för patienter med multipel ... ett forskningsavtal med SyntheticMR AB för att ... forskningsprojekt på sjukhuset. Med SyMRI kan man ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: