Navigation Links
Hispanic lung cancer patients tend to live longer than blacks and whites
Date:4/22/2012

A new analysis has found that Hispanic lung cancer patients seem to live longer than white or black patients. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that, as with several other types of cancer, certain yet-to-be-defined genetic and/or environmental factors put Hispanic patients at a survival advantage.

Most studies that look at ethnic and racial disparities in lung cancer compare black patients with whites. To see how Hispanics compare with other ethnicities with regards to survival after a lung cancer diagnosis, Ali Saeed, an MD/PhD candidate, and Brian Lally, MD, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, led a team that analyzed patient information from the Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, which compiles incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries in the United States.

The investigators identified 172,398 adult patients who were diagnosed with any stage of non-small cell lung cancer (the most common form of lung cancer) between 1988 and 2007.

Compared with white patients, Hispanic patients had a 15 percent lower risk of dying during the years of the study, whether they were born in the United States or not. "This is important because it shows that our findings are indicative of the Hispanic population in general and not specific to specific groups of Hispanics," said Saeed. Black patients were slightly more likely to die than whites. Also, Hispanics were more likely to develop a lung cancer type called bronchioalveolar carcinoma that is not as serious or life-threatening as other types.

"Our findings will motivate researchers and physicians to understand why Hispanics have more favorable outcomes and may shed light on potential environmental factors and/or genetic factors that can explain our observations," said Saeed. "For instance, the fact that Hispanics developed higher frequencies of bronchioalveolar carcinoma could be due to genetic predispositions and/or their lower smoking rates." (Smokers are at increased risk for developing tumor types associated with a poor prognosis.)

Saeed noted that the results fit into a phenomenon known as the "Hispanic paradox," in which Hispanics tend to have more favorable outcomes after being diagnosed with certain diseases despite having socioeconomic factors (such as decreased access to health care and higher poverty rates) that would predict otherwise. This paradox is seen for breast cancer, prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease, and now non-small cell lung cancer.


'/>"/>

Contact: Amy Molnar
healthnews@wiley.com
201-748-8844
Wiley-Blackwell
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Hispanic Americans Born Outside Country Have Fewer Strokes
2. Risk of Preterm Birth Rises for Hispanic Women the Longer Theyre in U.S.
3. Many Hispanics Dont Call an Ambulance For Stroke: Study
4. Parents May Hold Key to Healthy Weight in Hispanic Kids
5. Hispanic Women More Likely to Die of Breast Cancer
6. Maryland study finds that US Hispanics were at greater risk for H1N1 flu during 2009 pandemic
7. Hispanics With Diabetes Urged to Get Yearly Foot Care
8. White children far more likely to receive CT scans than Hispanic, African-American children
9. Hispanic women have higher incidence of rare breast tumor
10. Adding Folate to Tortilla Flour Might Cut Birth Defects Among Hispanics
11. 3.1 Million Hispanic Americans Struggle With Arthritis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... According to an article ... as a weight loss dietary supplement, is being recalled due to the discovery that ... because there is not a single supplement on the market proven to help people ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Dr. Sadati’s recent feature ... procedures. Along with performing procedures, the magazine also highlights that Dr. Sadati has ... One of the most common procedures he performs is his natural facelift. “As ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... The president ... DoD Military Health System but would shift more of the cost burden to military ... TRICARE-reform plan laid out in the defense budget as including limited quantifiable benefit fixes ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... surgery, dermatology and women’s health, is pleased to announce the promotions of Allison ... Partners sales team, Steve Catone to executive vice president of North American capital ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... Laurel, NJ (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 ... ... announces the call for nominations seeking candidates for the Board of Commissioners. Individuals ... with passion, skills and experience with diversity of clinical practice settings and across ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016 Potrero Medical, Inc., the developer of the ... appointment of George M. Rapier, III , MD, to ... , WellMed is one of the nation,s largest physician ... members in Texas and ... his own internal medicine practice, he has been instrumental to ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... AAIPharma Services Corp./Cambridge Major Laboratories, Inc. ... development services for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, ... in its Charleston, SC ... recent investments. Charleston ... with small-scale lyophilization. The site has invested in ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... SEOUL, South Korea , Feb. 11, 2016 Wearable posture tracker, ALEX , has ... project fully funded and just seven days left to go, ALEX is said to be delivered to ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160211/332248 ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: