Navigation Links
Higher levels of obesity associated with increased risk of death
Date:1/1/2013

CHICAGO In an analysis of nearly 100 studies that included approximately 3 million adults, relative to normal weight, overall obesity (combining all grades) and higher levels of obesity were both associated with a significantly higher all-cause risk of death, while overweight was associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality, according to a study in the January 2 issue of JAMA.

"Estimates of the relative mortality risks associated with normal weight, overweight, and obesity may help to inform decision making in the clinical setting," according to background information in the article.

Katherine M. Flegal, Ph.D., of the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues conducted a study to compile and summarize published analyses of body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality that provide hazard ratios (HRs) for standard BMI categories. For the review and meta-analysis, the researchers identified 97 studies that met inclusion criteria, which provided a combined sample size of more than 2.88 million individuals and more than 270,000 deaths. Regions of origin of participants included the United States or Canada (n = 41 studies), Europe (n = 37), Australia (n = 7), China or Taiwan (n = 4), Japan (n = 2), Brazil (n = 2), Israel (n = 2), India (n = l), and Mexico (n = l).

All-cause mortality HRs for overweight (BMI of 25-<30), obesity (BMI of ≥30), grade 1 obesity (BMI of 30-<35), and grades 2 and 3 obesity (BMI of ≥35) were calculated relative to normal weight (BMI of 18.5-<25).

The researchers found that the summary HRs indicated a 6 percent lower risk of death for overweight; a 18 percent higher risk of death for obesity (all grades); a 5 percent lower risk of death for grade 1 obesity; and a 29 percent increased risk of death for grades 2 and 3 obesity.

The authors note that the finding that grade 1 obesity was not associated with higher mortality suggests that that the excess mortality in obesity may predominantly be due to elevated mortality at higher BMI levels.

The researchers add that their findings are consistent with observations of lower mortality among overweight and moderately obese patients. "Possible explanations have included earlier presentation of heavier patients, greater likelihood of receiving optimal medical treatment, cardioprotective metabolic effects of increased body fat, and benefits of higher metabolic reserves."

The use of predefined standard BMI groupings can facilitate between-study comparisons, the authors conclude.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Hunter
ksh7@cdc.gov
404-639-3286
JAMA and Archives Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Chronic Worry Linked to Higher Risk of PTSD
2. Benefits of higher oxygen, breathing device persist after infancy
3. A New Review Reveals How “Jump Manual” Can Help People Jump Higher - Tony Nguyen
4. Daimer Debuts Carpet Cleaners For Car Dealerships Seeking Interior Auto Detailing Steam Cleaner Machines Featuring Higher Power and A Larger Water Capacity
5. Metro Atlanta ServiceMasters Team Up to Offer Higher Quality of Water Damage, Mold Removal, Carpet Cleaning and Fire Damage Services to Customers in North Georgia
6. Some Cancer Risks Higher in 9/11 Recovery Workers: Study
7. Chronic worriers at higher risk for PTSD
8. Children born prematurely are at higher risk of esophageal inflammation, cancer
9. Kids May Be at Slightly Higher Asthma Risk If Parents Had Infertility Treatments
10. Heart Drug Digoxin Tied to Higher Death Risk for Some Patients
11. Diabetes Rates Higher in Countries Using Lots of High Fructose Corn Syrup: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/23/2017)... , ... February 23, 2017 , ... HealthPostures, the desk ... an expert sit stand solutions representative to the Minneapolis Home and Garden Show which ... the event that is garnering national attention is the Minneapolis Convention Center. , ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Our ... to overwork even the sharpest brain. , Power On, a mental performance enhancer ... over clocking the brain. Each capsule contains Cognizin® Citicoline, a branded form of ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Secure ... to the largest network of hospitals, health information exchanges, physicians and patients, announced ... Information Technology (ONC-HIT) 2015 Edition Health IT Module Certification via Drummond Group LLC, ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... understand each Medicare Advantage member’s risk, identify any gaps-in-coding, as well as ... helps transform the HCC Risk Adjustment process from a typical fragmented process ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Sideline Products participated in the World Horse ... host Tom Seay and his production crew. Tom Seay’s program “Best of America ... world. Saddle Sidekicks will be featured on April 6, 2017. After the broadcast, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... York , February 23, 2017 ... arising from increasing caseload for varicose veins in their ... the globe are prompting the adoption of endovenous laser ... on global endovenous laser therapy market, published ... aftereffects of lifestyle choices and consequences of obesity have ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... According to a new market ... Digital, Analog), MRI (Closed, Open), Ultrasound, CT, Nuclear Imaging ... User (Hospitals, Imaging Centers) - Global Forecast to 2021", ... over the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. The ... 2021, at a CAGR of 6.6% from 2016 to ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Endoscopy ... over the next decade to reach approximately $47.6 billion by 2025. ... forecasts for all the given segments on global as well as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: