Navigation Links
High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy May Predict Later Ills, Study Says
Date:2/11/2013

MONDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy are at increased risk for heart disease, kidney disease and diabetes later in life, according to a new study.

The increased risk was seen even in women who had only one or two high blood pressure readings during their pregnancy, the researchers said.

"All of the later-life risks were similar in pregnant women who could otherwise be considered low-risk -- those who were young, normal weight, nonsmokers, with no diabetes during pregnancy," study lead author Dr. Tuija Mannisto, a postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, said in a journal release.

"According to our findings, women who have had high blood pressure during pregnancy or who are diagnosed with high blood pressure in pregnancy for the first time might benefit from comprehensive heart disease risk factor checks by their physicians, to decrease their long-term risk of heart diseases," Mannisto added.

It's known that women with preeclampsia -- a serious pregnancy-related disease marked by high blood pressure and protein in the urine -- are at increased risk for heart and kidney disease.

This study looked at less serious forms of high blood pressure that are much more common in pregnant women. The study included Finnish women who had babies in 1966 and were followed for 40 years.

One-third of the women had at least one high blood pressure reading during pregnancy. These women were 14 percent to 100 percent more likely to develop heart disease later in life than those with normal blood pressure throughout their pregnancy, according to the study in the journal Circulation.

Women with any high blood pressure during pregnancy also had a two to five times increased risk of dying from a heart attack and a 1.4 to 2.2 times higher risk of developing diabetes. Women who had any high blood pressure, with and without measurable protein in the urine, during pregnancy had a 1.9 to 2.8 times greater risk of developing kidney disease later in life.

The study also found that women with high blood pressure during pregnancy but normal blood pressure after pregnancy still had a 1.6 to 2.5 times greater risk of having high blood pressure requiring medication or hospitalization later in life.

Mannisto said future research should explore whether lifestyle changes and post-pregnancy follow-up could change these women's long-term health.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about high blood pressure during pregnancy.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Circulation, news release, Feb. 11, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
2. Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines
3. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
4. Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
5. High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
6. Changes in gene expression may help explain high blood pressure in pregnancy
7. Researchers Develop Blood Test for Depression
8. Naturopathic care can improve blood sugar, mood in diabetes
9. Diabetes Groups Issue New Guidelines on Blood Sugar
10. Exercise May Help Patients With High Blood Pressure Live Longer
11. Additional blood pressure screening may reduce incidence of CVD events and death by up to 3 percent
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy May Predict Later  Ills, Study Says
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Coast Dental Fort Stewart is celebrating its ... location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at 112 Vilseck Road in Fort Stewart. There ... TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity to meet general dentists Thomas Richards, DDS, ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... Spine Team Texas, a comprehensive spine physician group specializing in the treatment ... been invited to be a featured speaker at the Texas Society of the American ... 2016. , Dr. R. Scott McPherson, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist, will ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Mobility Designed is redefining mobility ... the armpits, the M+D Crutch evenly distributes body weight from the elbow to the ... when using the crutches than with other crutches. , Co-founders Max and Liliana Younger ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The Gluten-Free ... is pleased to announce the launch of the GFCP Scoop in ... more. The purpose of the GFCP Scoop site is to keep ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... Dr. Robert Mondavi, one of the dentists in Torrance , is now ... as more patients are discovering the many different ways they can change and improve ... to them and which ones might work for their smiles. , “One of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... 2016   Acsis , a leading provider of ... market research and advisory firm IDC has named it ... Worldwide Pharmaceutical Track and Trace Software 2016 Vendor Assessment ... assessment of the capabilities and business strategies of 10 ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160427/360791LOGO ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016 New ... 2016" is a report that provides an overview ... R&D pipelines by identifying new targets and MOAs ... Company Profiles discussed in this H1 2016 Osteoarthritis ... Srl, AbbVie Inc., Abiogen Pharma S.p.A., Ablynx NV, ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Avril 2016   ... +5% sur le trimestre, soutenu par une croissance ... Croissance de +16% des ventes aux hôpitaux ... Kea Technologies (Euronext : MKEA, FR0010609263 ; OTCQX : MKEAY), inventeur ... aujourd,hui son chiffre d,affaires pour le premier trimestre ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: