Navigation Links
Hebrew University researchers show octopuses make some pretty good moves
Date:5/18/2011

Jerusalem, May 18, 2011 In case you thought that octopuses were smart only in guessing the outcome of soccer matches (remember the late Paul the octopus in Germany who picked all the right winners in last year's world cup matches in Johannesburg?), scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have now shown that not only are they smart, they can make some pretty good moves as well.

Octopuses are among the most developed invertebrates. They have large brains and are fast learners. With eight arms and no rigid skeleton, they perform many tasks like crawling, swimming, mating and hunting. And unlike most animals such as humans -- who are restricted in their movements by a rigid skeleton which helps in determining the position of their limbs octopuses have limitless flexibility.

But because they have no such rigid structure, it was believed that the octopuses have only limited control over their eight flexible limbs. However, the Hebrew University researchers have shown otherwise. They developed a three-choice, transparent, plexiglass maze that required the octopus to use a single arm and direct it to a visually marked compartment outside of its tank of water that contained a food reward.

The octopuses in the experiment learned to insert a single arm through a central tube, out of the water, and into the correct marked goal compartment to retrieve the food reward. This success was dependent on visual information, which the octopuses were able to translate into a series of coordinated movements made by a single arm and retrieve the food. They were also able to repeat this process.

The completion of this task shows for the first time that an octopus can direct a single arm in a complex movement to a target location. Motor control issues, such as this, are the basis of an ongoing European Union research project aimed at building a "robot octopus." To understand how the octopus controls its movements, and to what extent it controls them, is therefore an important base for the design of the control architecture of a robot devoid of a rigid skeleton.

The research was reported on in a recent edition of Current Biology, and was authored by Tamar Gutnick, Prof. Binyamin Hochner and Dr. Michael Kuba of the Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation at the Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences at the Hebrew University, and Dr. Ruth A. Byrne of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jerry Barach
jerryb@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82904
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Hebrew University researchers demonstrate why DNA breaks down in cancer cells
2. Mechanism for invasion of tumorous cells discovered by Hebrew University researchers
3. Hebrew University researchers discover expanded role for cancer-causing gene
4. Hebrew University added to Singapore research program
5. Collagen manufactured from transgenic tobacco plants at Hebrew University
6. 3 University of Houston students chosen as Albert Schweitzer Fellows
7. Yale and Rush University scientists receive Sanberg Awards from ASNTR
8. Thomas Jefferson University and hospitals tasked to find new radiation drugs
9. Boston University researchers validate important roles of iPSCs in regenerative medicine
10. Record funding award given to Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine
11. University of Houston wins NIH grant for vaccine study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Hebrew University researchers show octopuses make some pretty good moves 
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... PurhealthRX , a leading ... Purzorb™ technology. Applying the Purzorb™process to full spectrum CBD oil will revolutionize the rapidly ... CBD form that can be easily incorporated into liquid products, while reducing costs to ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... OBISPO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... or dementia. However, many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for care if ... the 90-day elimination period, when the family pays for care, is often waived, so ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and ... explains one of the most popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, ... puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The ... identity. “America On The Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. ... great-grandchildren. As a WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... WAUSAU, Wis. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... formulated standard products to meet the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities ... team of probiotic experts and tested to meet the highest standard. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... Oct. 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. ... for injectable drug administration, today shared the results of ... for improving the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The ... Summit in May 2017 by Dr. Ondrej Mach ... World Health Organization (WHO), and recently published in the ...
(Date:10/4/2017)...  South Korean-based healthcare product Development Company I.M. Lab ... Kickstarter. The device will educate the user about ,proper, ... efficiency compared to the dated and pricey CPR training ... of the compression for a more informed CPR training. ... raise $5,000. cprCUBE ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO ... LLC , and named its founder as Diplomat,s chief ... Tennessee , will operate under Diplomat subsidiary ... offerings for health care partners to include IT outsourcing, ... "In an interoperable world, technology delivers comprehensive insight ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: