Navigation Links
Heavier People Have Heart Attacks Earlier
Date:9/9/2008

12 years sooner for the most obese, new research finds

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The fatter you are, the more likely you are to have a heart attack earlier in life, a new study shows.

"Basically, it is showing that as people got progressively more obese, the rate at which they had heart attacks early went up dramatically," said Dr. Eric D. Peterson, a professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center's Division of Cardiology and a member of the group reporting the findings.

Cardiologists at several institutions studied data on more than 111,000 people who had heart attacks, looking specifically at body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity. Someone with a BMI of 30 or above is regarded as obese; a person 5 feet, 7 inches tall who weighs 192 pounds has a BMI of 30.

The average age of a first heart attack for people with a BMI of 18.5 or under was 74.6 years. For people with a BMI of 40 or over, it was 58.7 years. The age at which a first heart attack occurred went up steadily with increasing BMI -- 3.5 years earlier for a BMI of 25 to 30; 6.8 years earlier for a BMI 30 to 35; 9.4 years for a BMI of 35 to 40; and 12 years earlier for a BMI 40 or higher.

"That is a pretty profound difference," Peterson said.

One reason for the difference is that obese people are more likely to have other risk factors for heart disease, such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. "But even after adjusting for those factors, just being heavy added considerable risk," Peterson said.

The findings are published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Another study in the same issue of the journal provided evidence for a mechanism by which obesity increases cardiac risk. Researchers at Leiden University in the Netherlands had obese people with diabetes practice "prolonged calorie restriction," or dieting in layman's terms.

BMI went down. But sophisticated tests such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical studies also showed that their bodies were better able to manage blood sugar levels and that there were beneficial effects on heart muscle cells.

"The news here is that heart muscle in obese diabetic individuals can be mobilized by eating less," said Dr. Heinrich Taegtmeyer, professor of medicine in cardiology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston and co-author of an accompanying editorial comment.

To be sure, the mechanism by which dieting helps heart cells "is only vaguely understood," Taegtmeyer said. "It gets very biochemical and very molecular." A simple explanation is that caloric restriction activates an enzyme that prevents fat from being deposited in heart cells, he said.

Whatever the mechanism, the new research provides "one more reason not to be fat," Peterson said. Some obese people have taken comfort from studies indicating that they're more likely to survive a heart attack than thinner people, he noted. The new study indicates that the reason for that better survival is the heart attack in fat people occurs earlier in life, when people are otherwise sturdier, he said.

"If you had your choice, you would choose not to have a heart attack in the first place," Peterson said.

Both Peterson and Taegtmeyer cited animal studies showing that strict caloric restriction lengthens life.

"It has been shown in virtually every organism, from yeast to flies to worms to mammals, that caloric restriction heightens life expectancy," Taegtmeyer said. "The heart functions better with caloric restriction."

More information

Learn more about obesity and its ill effects from the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Eric D. Peterson, M.D., M.P.H., FAHA, FACC, professor of medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.; Heinrich Taegtmeyer, M.D., professor of medicine, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston; Sept. 16, 2008, Journal of the American College of Cardiology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Living longer with obesity means heavier burden for hospitals
2. Holidays Dont Have to Leave You Heavier
3. Infidelity dissected: New research on why people cheat
4. High-Tech Vet Medicine Saving Lives of Pets and People
5. Phone World-famed Martin Schiff, M.D., at 310-454-6172 for Free Weight Loss No Diet, No Stuff Method. Hates Diets, Loves to Have People Help Themselves
6. Obese people with asthma have nearly 5 times greater risk of hospitalization for asthma
7. Fat Cells in Obese People Are Sick
8. Daschle, Convention Delegates, Daughtry Join to Give Help to AIDS-Affected People Around the World
9. New Research Study Seeks Improved Quality of Life for People in the Future with Schizophrenia
10. Healthy people and enhancement drugs
11. Meals or Meds? BenefitsCheckUp Helps Older People Struggling with Food Costs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... 13, 2016 , ... Christie Medical Holdings, Inc. presented the ... VeinViewer® Vision vein finder for the nursing school simulation lab. This ... draw blood, combining technology with traditional technique. , “VeinViewer is a wonderful new ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... February 13, 2016 , ... In the early or “honeymoon” stage of a ... go out of their way to be romantic, and may exaggerate a strength or ... any online dating profile. , A recent study from Queendom.com , however, ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... Vinci-assisted hernia surgeries are beginning to account for a significant portion of hernia repairs ... Shirin Towfigh of the Beverly Hills Hernia Center notes that this trend has not ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... 12, 2016 , ... The law firm of Morrow, Morrow, Ryan & Bassett ... of these scholarships is to encourage applicants to pursue a degree in their field ... two parishes. , “We have available jobs in St. Landry and Evangeline Parishes ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through ... over 250 members of South Florida’s philanthropic community at its 10th anniversary Fashion ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... SAN DIEGO and SEOUL, ... -- Silicon Biosys­tems Menarini and Macrogen, Inc. today ... clinical assays and innovative procedures for precision medicine ... to combine Silicon Biosystems, DEPArray™ digital-sorting technology with ... development of tests certified under the Clinical Laboratory ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Feb. 12, 2016  Apellis ... completed a $47.1 million Series D preferred ... Asset Management, Hillhouse Capital Group and venBio ... Venture Investments, AJU IB Investment, and Epidarex ... used to further advance clinical trials in ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016 Stem cells are primitive cells found ... and the capacity to differentiate into mature cell types ... the first mouse embryonic stem cells were derived from ... that the first culturing of embryonic stem cells from ... produced until 2006 As a result of these discoveries, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: