Navigation Links
Heart needs work after heart attack: U of A Study challenges the notion that the heart must rest
Date:4/14/2011

(Edmonton) A new study by researchers at the University of Alberta shows that for best results in stable patients after heart attack, early exercise as well as prolonged exercise is the key to the best outcomes.

Study co-authors Mark Haykowsky, researcher in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, and Alex Clark, researcher in the Faculty of Nursing, along with fellow U of A researchers Don Schopflocher in the School of Public Health, and Ian Paterson in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, as well as colleagues from Duke, Stanford and UBC, reviewed more than 20 years of trials. The study found that stable patients who have suffered heart attacks get more benefits for heart performance when starting an exercise program one week after the heart attack, than waiting a month or longer to begin rehabilitation. "While it's been shown that exercise has a favourable effect on heart function, it's also important to dispel the idea that what the heart needs is rest," said Haykowsky. The authors point out that, in fact, the heart will become better with exercise sooner and with continued exercise over a longer period of time.

"In the past, patients in Canada and the US have been told to wait for one month before beginning their exercise treatment and this treatment typically only goes on for about three months," said Clark.

Patients who begin an exercise program one week after their heart attack were found to have the best heart performance. For those that waited to begin their exercise rehabilitation program, the results showed that "for every week that a patient delayed his or her exercise treatment, he or she would have to train for the equivalent of one month longer to get similar benefits," said Clark. "Our findings suggest that at least six months of exercise is the most beneficial."

Exercise in this study is defined as aerobic exercise in a group setting to build up exercise capacity.

The researchers reviewed both benefits and harms of exercise. The authors say there was no evidence in the studies to suggest that beginning an exercise program earlier that the typical waiting period had any detrimental effects.

"In the 70's, health-care professionals were telling patients not to move for three months after a heart attack. Our findings suggest that stable patients need not wait a month to start exercising in a cardiac rehabilitation setting," said Clark.

Given that, in Canada, only one third of patients are referred to rehabilitation after a heart attack and then only 20 per cent then attend, Haykowsky says the key to the best outcome is for patients to not only get referred to rehabilitation, but to be referred early, participate and stick with it.

"Exercise is a wonder drug that hasn't been bottled," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sandra Pysklywyc
sandra.pysklywyc@ualberta.ca
780-492-0436
University of Alberta
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. ICU Patients at Risk for Rare Heart Rhythm Problem
2. Cook With Love This Valentines Day With Heart-Smart Recipes
3. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
4. Highmark Foundation Awards $120,000 to the American Heart Association
5. Womens Heart Disease Awareness Still Lacking
6. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
7. Migraine Linked to Increased Heart Attack Risk
8. PERSONALABS Offers Discounted Healthy Heart Online Blood Tests in February
9. Compound shows promise against intractable heart failure
10. New American Heart Association Survey Finds Heart Disease and Stroke Patients Face Significant Barriers in Obtaining Quality, Affordable Care
11. Ex-President Clinton Undergoes Heart Procedure
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/30/2016)... , ... April 30, 2016 , ... ... Studios. With inMotion3D Abstract users can distort and manipulate three-dimensional shapes with ease ... rotation, columns, rows, ranks, point, lines, polygons, polygon texture animation, opacity texture animation, ...
(Date:4/30/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... ... News on April 4th, 2016 questioned the use of the HyProCure sinus ... as “a controversial procedure.” EOTTS-HyProCure is a minimally invasive procedure performed, when ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... In an article published April 16th on the New York ... injections, which she underwent in order to feel more at home at this year’s ... article explains that Ms. Mirmelli’s situation is not unique; many plastic surgeons say they’ve ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... On Tuesday, April 26, 2016 members of the HomeTown Health network, a network ... on SB 258, the “Rural Health Care Relief” Bill. , The bill, which was ... individuals and corporations which donate directly to a “rural hospital” in Georgia, and goes ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Coast Dental Fort Stewart ... at its new location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at 112 Vilseck Road in ... 50-inch Samsung Smart TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity to meet general dentists ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... 2016 , Net Sales of $1.90 billion ... the prior year period, and an increase of 1.2% on ... EPS for the first quarter were $0.52 reported, a decrease ... an increase of 29.9% over the prior year period ... guidance for 2016 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 Oramed ... a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development of oral ... in the upcoming PIONEERS 2016 conference, presented by Joseph ... 2016 in New York . Nadav ... at the conference. Presentation Details:   ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016  ValGenesis, Inc., the ... Solutions (VLMS) today announced that a prominent ... sufferers of chronic kidney failure has selected ... their corporate validation process. The global medical ... solution to manage their validation processes electronically. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: