Navigation Links
Heart Transplant Failures More Likely in Poor, Minority Kids

Low socioeconomic status and non-white race linked to worse outcomes

TUESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Minority children and those in poorer neighborhoods are more likely to die or need a second heart transplant than white children or those in better-off neighborhoods, according to the results of a U.S. study.

The study included 135 children, median age 8.4 years, who received their first heart transplant at Children's Hospital Boston between 1991 and 2005. There were 110 white children, 10 black children, eight Hispanic children and seven children from other racial groups.

Overall, 40 children died and six underwent a re-transplant during the study period. Nine of the deaths occurred during the initial hospitalization after the first transplant. Among the children who survived the initial post-transplant hospitalization, there were 31 deaths and six re-transplants over a median of six years.

The study found that:

  • Children from low socioeconomic neighborhoods were 2.4 times more likely to require another heart transplant than those from higher socioeconomic neighborhoods.
  • Minority children were 2.7 times more likely to need a second transplant than white children.
  • Among the nine deaths during initial post-transplant hospitalization, six deaths (13.3 percent) involved children in the lower socioeconomic group and three (3.3 percent) involved children in the higher socioeconomic group.
  • Children in the lower socioeconomic group had much lower rates of transplanted heart survival at 12 months, three years and five years after the transplant.
  • Time to death or re-transplantation was significantly shorter for children in the lower socioeconomic group. They also had a higher risk of rejection of their transplanted heart.

"Low socioeconomic status and non-white race appear to be independent risk factors for worse outcomes," lead author Dr. Tajinder P. Singh, a transplant cardiologist at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, said in a news release.

These children may be sicker when they arrive at the transplant center or they "may have difficulty using available resources from the medical community, which may reflect the lack of resources available to them at a personal and family level," Singh said.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation: Heart Failure, should be considered preliminary and need to be confirmed in larger population groups, the researchers noted.

"Improving the outcomes of heart transplantation in the lower socioeconomic status children requires new strategies and interventions for patients, families and the medical system," Singh said.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about children and heart transplants.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 7, 2009

Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Drug for cluster headaches may cause heart problems
2. Use of certain lipid measures not more effective in predicting coronary heart disease
3. Restricting Blood Flow May Help Heart Bypass Patients
4. Urban Smog Tough on Young Adults Hearts
5. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
6. Vitamin Es lack of heart benefit linked to dosage
7. Drug That Lowers Resting Heart Rate Being Tested
8. Heart Attack Boosts Diabetes Risk
9. Embryonic Stem Cells Repair Human Heart
10. U of M study: Early treatment can reverse heart damage
11. Embryonic Human Stem Cells May Help Repair Heart Muscle, Lab Study Shows
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Heart Transplant Failures More Likely in Poor, Minority Kids
(Date:11/30/2015)... TX (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... plastic surgery and dermatology, is proud to announce that its ThermiRFR temperature controlled ... , ThermiRF is an innovative multi-application radiofrequency platform which uses temperature as a ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... , ... MOSI recently added two state-of-the-art augmented reality (AR) experiences from INDE ... their collection of interactive exhibits within the Kids In Charge! building. In collaboration with ... get closer than ever to a range of animals as they drink, sleep and ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The world of hair transplants and ... unit extraction. These techniques and procedures have been in use for many years and ... While Dr. Parsa Mohebi, M.D. has utilized many of these methods over the years, ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... On Saturday, October 24th, 2015, at the ... annual fundraising event, a 5K walk known as “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer”. Patients ... which is also located in Battle Creek, joined in for this campaign that sought ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... , ... The presidential race normally deals with political issues of national importance ... news story when Donald Trump makes disparaging remarks about Hillary Clinton’s hairstyle? It is ... wants to admit when it comes to how people are viewed by others. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... BANNOCKBURN, Ill. , Nov. 30, 2015 ... ), a global biopharmaceutical leader dedicated to ... diseases and underserved medical conditions, today announced ... [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), PEGylated], an extended circulating ... hemophilia A based on full-length ADVATE [Antihemophilic ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... HONG KONG, Nov. 30, 2015 (HK$,000)For the Six Months Ended 30 September ... Service Income , 421,979 , 384,242 ... , 34,719 , (18.3) Medical ... , 16.1 Medical Devices and Accessories Sales , ... Chinese Herbal Medicines Sales , 2,822 , ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... November 30, 2015 --> ... "Dental Lasers Market by Product (Soft Tissue, All Tissue, Dental ... (Hospitals, Clinics), and Geography - Global Forecast to 2020", published ... 2020, at a CAGR of 5.2% during the forecast period ... data Tables and 62 Figures spread through 167 P ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: