Navigation Links
Heart Risks the Same With 2 Diabetes Drugs: Study
Date:8/25/2010

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that the risk of heart attacks or death after taking the glucose-lowering diabetes drugs Avandia and Actos are about the same.

This is a direct contradiction to numerous other studies that found that the risk was elevated for Avandia (rosiglitazone) but not for Actos (pioglitazone). The findings are, however, in line with some other previous studies, further muddying the picture for patients and doctors trying to select the best drug with the least side effects.

"The rosiglitazone story gets more and more interesting and confusing. It seems every time we have a study that indicates a problem with the drug, another one finds no trouble with it," said Dr. Kirk Garratt, clinical director of interventional cardiovascular research at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

In July, members of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended adding a second black-box warning to Avandia's label warning of the cardiac dangers, while essentially clearing Actos, at least for the time being.

But one expert feels that both drugs, which belong to a class of medications known as thiazolidinediones, should be avoided.

"Purely from a heart standpoint, none of these medicines have been shown to help and probably do increase the risk [of heart problems]," said Dr. Bryan Henry, a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "I think glucophage or Metformin should always be the first-line drug to start treatment."

While not preventing heart attacks or strokes, Avandia and Actos have been shown to prevent some of the microvascular complications of diabetes, such as kidney trouble and neuropathy.

The new study, published Aug. 24 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, differed from many previous trials in several respects, which may account for the differences in findings.

"The patients in this study seem to have been younger [average age 54] and healthier than we've seen in other studies: only about 2 percent had significant pre-existing cardiac conditions," Garratt said. "Most importantly, [cardiovascular] event rates were remarkably low. In fact, event rates were so low it wasn't possible to analyze subgroups, to see if things like kidney function or prior heart attack influenced the response to rosiglitazone."

The study authors analyzed prescribing data for about 30,000 patients with type 2 diabetes, all of whom were members of a private insurance group.

The risk of a heart attack, heart failure or dying hovered at 4 percent over close to three years no matter which medication the patient was taking.

"Our study looked at a population of commercially insured patients so these potentially could represent healthier and younger patients," said study lead author Debra Wertz, outcomes research manager for HealthCore, Inc., the research subsidiary of the insurance company WellPoint, which funded the study.

The time frame of this study -- early 2001 through late 2005 -- may also have affected the findings. "Over the course of time, treatment patterns may change and could impact differences. Avandia use, for instance, has changed quite a bit," she said, with fewer prescriptions written.

"As a general statement, this is not going to change prescribing per se, but it does offer another tool for patients and providers for evaluating the use of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone," Wertz added. "I think it's helpful for doctors and patients to be aware of all the available data and then use that information when making decisions."

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on thiazolidinediones.

SOURCES: Debra Wertz, Pharm.D., outcomes research manager, HealthCore, Inc., Wilmington, Del.; Bryan Henry, M.D., assistant professor of medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York; Kirk Garratt, M.D., clinical director of interventional cardiovascular research, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Aug. 24, 2010, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Math from the heart: Simulating stent design and coating
2. Innovative imaging system may boost speed and accuracy in treatment of heart rhythm disorder
3. Deaths From Heart Attack Rise With Delays in Care
4. Moderate chocolate consumption linked to lower risks of heart failure
5. Small Amounts of Dark Chocolate May Guard Against Heart Failure
6. Mayos smart adult stem cells repair hearts
7. Red Meat May Boost Womens Heart Disease Risk
8. Hostile, Competitive Types May Be Harming Their Hearts
9. Elevated heart rate over time linked to significant risk of death
10. Spinal muscular atrophy may also affect the heart
11. Hearts sounds can help diagnose heart failure
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Hight-Doland Insurance Agency’s new community involvement program which serves families ... Sisters of Southwest Louisiana to help provide positive mentoring for local youth. Donations to ... Sisters of Southwest Louisiana has been helping to guide the area’s youth for over ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... May kicked ... in people across the United States. Dermatologist Dr. Ellen Turner is encouraging her patients, ... experts’ advice and focus on skin safety and health now and in the future. ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... ... May 04, 2016 , ... ... transforming breastfeeding for nursing mothers. The company’s patented technology, The Smart Breastfeeding Meter, ... the company announced that the technology is now available for purchase at ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... ... Charlotte, N.C., changed her life forever with a same-day LASIK procedure at ... to poor eyesight. Dr. Jonathan Christenbury performed her surgery the same day as her ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... ... comprehensive care that ex-supermodel Janice Dickinson needed following breast cancer surgery. In March 2016, ... in situ, a type of breast cancer that occurs in the milk ducts, according ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... Utah , May 3, 2016  Forté Elements, LLC (Forté) is excited to ... nutritional products that address the nutritional needs of recovery for a variety of clinical ... products. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160502/362548 Logo -  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160502/362547LOGO ... ... ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... Leading Economies with Fastest Real GDP Annual Percentage Change, ... 8 Ireland 7.8 India 7.3, , Source: IMF and TechSci ... comprises of Brazil , Russia , ... Africa , registered the fastest GDP growth during the first decade of ... , recession in Brazil and Russia ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... , May 2, 2016 ... reach USD 11.1 billion by 2024, according to ... Inc. Major drivers of the sonography market include ... and government recommendations for periodic ultrasound screenings of ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ) High ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: