Navigation Links
Heart Deaths Rise With Extreme Temperatures, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Extreme temperatures during hot or cold spells may increase the risk of premature death from heart disease, a new Australian study says.

The risk of heart disease-related death is higher during heat waves than during cold snaps, according to the study, which was published Sept. 18 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

These new findings are important in light of growing rates of obesity and climate change, said lead researcher Cunrui Huang, of the School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia.

"With increasing rates of obesity and related conditions, including diabetes, more people will be vulnerable to extreme temperatures," Huang said in a journal news release. "That could increase the future disease burden of extreme temperatures."

Researchers compared daily temperatures in Brisbane between 1996 and 2004 with years of life lost to heart disease during the same period. Years of life lost measures premature death by estimating years of life lost according to average life expectancy.

The average daily temperature during that time was 68.9 degrees Fahrenheit. The coldest 1 percent of days (53 degrees) were characterized as cold spells and the hottest 1 percent (84.5 degrees) as heat waves.

The researchers found that 72 years of life per 1 million people were lost each day because of heart disease. The risk of premature death from heart disease was highest when extreme heat lasted for two or more days.

Previous research has shown that extreme temperatures can trigger changes in blood pressure, blood thickness, cholesterol and heart rate, according to the news release.

Study co-author Adrian Barnett, associate professor of biostatistics at the university, said the researchers have a theory as to why deaths from extreme heat outrun deaths from severe cold.

"We suspect that people take better protective actions during prolonged cold weather, which might be why we did not find as great a risk of [cardiovascular death] during cold spells," Barnett said.

While the study uncovered an association between temperature and heart disease-linked fatalities, it didn't establish a causal relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health outlines how to reduce your risk of heart disease.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, news release, Sept. 18, 2012

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Early menopause associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke
2. Eat Your Heart Out 2012: Queen Mary to host anatomy-themed baking festival
3. Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as Top Cause of Death Among U.S. Hispanics
4. $8.9 million NIH grant to study genomic link to premature heart disease
5. Stressful Job Might Be Tough on the Heart
6. Scientists Map Genetic Blueprint of Heart
7. Hopkins scientists discover how an out-of-tune protein leads to muscle demise in heart failure
8. Omega-3s May Not Help Your Heart After All, Study Says
9. Common Painkillers Might Boost Odds for 2nd Heart Attack
10. University of Maryland study: Neonatal heart stem cells may help mend kids broken hearts
11. Tight Blood Sugar Control Wont Help Babies After Heart Surgery
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Heart Deaths Rise With Extreme Temperatures, Study Finds
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Insightra Medical, Inc. and Novus ... technology for soft tissue repair in the US via Insightra’s national direct sales ... mesh intended to support and reinforce soft tissue for 6-9 months before absorbing ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... SIMmersion’s ability to present dynamic scenarios ... of the future. To reach an audience of key visionaries and reformers in ... Chicago, organized by the American Medical Association. , AMA President Steven Stack, ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... enterprise Time and Attendance/Workforce Management cloud-based solutions, announced today that it has ... competencies in the Application Development, demonstrating a “best-in-class” ability and commitment to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... November 30, 2015 (PRWEB) , ... ... ... and Winscribe are pleased to announce their strategic partnership at the Radiological ... consultants, SpeechCheck, Inc., and Winscribe, global providers of cutting-edge dictation and speech-enabled ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... World Patent Marketing , a ... household invention that provides an economical and easy way of gaining customized curtains. ... at 2.6%," says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of World Patent Marketing. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... --> adds "Global ... and "Investigation Report on China Repaglinide ... 2021 forecasts data and information to ... . --> ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , Nov. 26, 2015 Research and ... of the "2016 Future Horizons and Growth ... Market: Supplier Shares, Country Segment Forecasts, Competitive Intelligence, ... --> --> ... of the Italian therapeutic drug monitoring market, including ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... addition of the  "2016 Future Horizons ... Cell Surface Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... to their offering.  --> ... of the  "2016 Future Horizons and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: