Navigation Links
Heart Deaths Rise With Extreme Temperatures, Study Finds
Date:9/18/2012

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Extreme temperatures during hot or cold spells may increase the risk of premature death from heart disease, a new Australian study says.

The risk of heart disease-related death is higher during heat waves than during cold snaps, according to the study, which was published Sept. 18 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

These new findings are important in light of growing rates of obesity and climate change, said lead researcher Cunrui Huang, of the School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia.

"With increasing rates of obesity and related conditions, including diabetes, more people will be vulnerable to extreme temperatures," Huang said in a journal news release. "That could increase the future disease burden of extreme temperatures."

Researchers compared daily temperatures in Brisbane between 1996 and 2004 with years of life lost to heart disease during the same period. Years of life lost measures premature death by estimating years of life lost according to average life expectancy.

The average daily temperature during that time was 68.9 degrees Fahrenheit. The coldest 1 percent of days (53 degrees) were characterized as cold spells and the hottest 1 percent (84.5 degrees) as heat waves.

The researchers found that 72 years of life per 1 million people were lost each day because of heart disease. The risk of premature death from heart disease was highest when extreme heat lasted for two or more days.

Previous research has shown that extreme temperatures can trigger changes in blood pressure, blood thickness, cholesterol and heart rate, according to the news release.

Study co-author Adrian Barnett, associate professor of biostatistics at the university, said the researchers have a theory as to why deaths from extreme heat outrun deaths from severe cold.

"We suspect that people take better protective actions during prolonged cold weather, which might be why we did not find as great a risk of [cardiovascular death] during cold spells," Barnett said.

While the study uncovered an association between temperature and heart disease-linked fatalities, it didn't establish a causal relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health outlines how to reduce your risk of heart disease.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, news release, Sept. 18, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Early menopause associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke
2. Eat Your Heart Out 2012: Queen Mary to host anatomy-themed baking festival
3. Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as Top Cause of Death Among U.S. Hispanics
4. $8.9 million NIH grant to study genomic link to premature heart disease
5. Stressful Job Might Be Tough on the Heart
6. Scientists Map Genetic Blueprint of Heart
7. Hopkins scientists discover how an out-of-tune protein leads to muscle demise in heart failure
8. Omega-3s May Not Help Your Heart After All, Study Says
9. Common Painkillers Might Boost Odds for 2nd Heart Attack
10. University of Maryland study: Neonatal heart stem cells may help mend kids broken hearts
11. Tight Blood Sugar Control Wont Help Babies After Heart Surgery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Heart Deaths Rise With Extreme Temperatures, Study Finds
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Hair ... new member survey conducted by the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery ... to 2016 rose 60 percent, with 635,189 procedures performed in 2016. , ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... eat right or exercise more try taking a more holistic approach and use ... Aweganic’s new Amazon essential oil collection is certified USDA guaranteeing that, the new ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Preora Diagnostics Inc. , a privately ... received two prestigious recognitions that acknowledge the promise of its PWS Nanoctyology platform ... been named a Top 100 Finalist for the 16th annual Chicago Innovation Awards ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... FlipBelt, the fitness brand ... to detail to the athletic wear market with the launch of their FlipBelt Crops. ... have their essentials securely at their fingertips while at the gym, on the trail, ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... In ... and Clark College Emeritus Professor of Education Gregory A. Smith examines student privacy ... Asleep at the Switch: Schoolhouse Commercialism, Privacy, and the Failure of Policymaking . ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/5/2017)... , Sept. 5, 2017 Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... ), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development ... has successfully concluded its meeting with the U.S. Food ... oral insulin formulation. ... the regulatory pathway for submission of ORMD-0801, would be ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... 1, 2017  Explorers Like Us ( https://explorerslikeus.com/ ) is ... experiences — and deliver these experiences as part of Life ... feel and heal better. ... While nothing beats a walk, jog or simply ... Life Environments™ is the next best thing when getting there ...
(Date:8/31/2017)... NEW YORK , Aug. 31, 2017 ... the industry,s must-read guide to the latest innovations happening ... the first industry publication to focus on providing a ... advancements. Ultimately, the issue covers the most innovative companies, ... year. "Everyone in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: