Navigation Links
Heart Attacks at School Involve More Adults Than Kids
Date:8/27/2007

Whether defibrillators should be available an open question, researcher says

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- When a student dies from cardiac arrest while on school grounds, it makes the evening news, but the actual incidence of heart attacks on school property is rare, and most of the victims are adults, researchers report.

After reviewing 16 years of emergency medical service calls in the Seattle area, researchers found that faculty and staff were 25 times more likely than students to suffer cardiac arrest. The report is in the Sept. 18 issue of Circulation.

"Cardiac arrest does occur in schools, though it is quite uncommon," said lead researcher Dr. Tom Rea, an associate professor of medicine at Harborview Medical Center and the University of Washington School of Medicine. "It is much more likely to occur in adults as opposed to students."

The goal of the study is to provide data to people who are considering how they want to set up emergency response systems in schools, Rea said.

"This study gives the backbone for policymakers and schools to make the decision of how much priority are they going to give to cardiac arrest, especially implementing automated external defibrillator (AED) programs," Rea said.

In the study, Rea's team looked at 3,773 cardiac arrests in King County, Washington, that occurred between January 1990 and December 2005. Of these cases, 97 occurred in the 641 schools that ranged from preschools to colleges. In seven of those cardiac arrests, the affiliation between the victim and the school was unknown.

The researchers found that of the remaining 90 cases, 12 students suffered cardiac arrest -- eight were 18 or younger. There were 33 cardiac arrests among faculty and staff. In addition, 45 adults who had no connection to the school had cardiac arrest while on school property that included sports fields and tracks.

Of the eight younger students who suffered cardiac arrest, four had known heart or lung disease or were severely developmentally disabled, Rea's group reported.

The remaining question is what, if anything, should be done by schools to prepare for these rare events. The idea that has gotten the most attention is training school personnel in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation using AEDs. AEDs are used to restart the heart after cardiac arrest.

Rea was noncommittal about what should be done. "It is a loaded question," he said. "When a tragic event occurs in a school, it has far-reaching effects. Although these events are extremely uncommon, you have to decide if you want to be prepared for even the most uncommon event. It's a decision that individual schools or school districts have to grapple with."

One expert thinks these findings show the need for expanding CPR training and the availability of AEDs in schools.

"It is estimated that over 350,000 individuals die of sudden cardiac arrest in the U.S. each year," said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Improved cardiac arrest recognition and emergency activation, early CPR, and early defibrillation, including the use of AEDs, can significantly increase the chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest."

This study provides important community-based data on the incidence, circumstances and outcome of cardiac arrest in the school setting, Fonarow said. "This study found that half of the student cardiac arrests were not associated with physical exertion or sports participation, and student risk was similar for elementary school, middle school, high school and college," he said.

The majority of cardiac arrests in schools occurred among adults, Fonarow noted. "The finding supports the assertion that school-based CPR and AED programs would benefit not only students, but faculty, staff members, as well as school visitors, and provides important data for considering increasing CPR training and the availability of AEDs in the school setting," he said.

Another expert disagrees. The very rarity of cardiac arrests at schools makes having AEDs available unnecessary, he said.

"Any cardiac arrest in a student, especially if it occurs on school grounds, gets a lot of media attention," said Dr. Byron Lee, an associate professor of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco. "This has led some to call for AED in every school."

However, because cardiac arrest at schools is extremely rare, and only a minority of cardiac arrests occurs in the students, "it seems unlikely that putting an AED in every school would be cost-effective," Lee said.

More information

For more information on heart attack, visit the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Tom Rea, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor, medicine, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; Byron Lee, M.D., associate professor, cardiology, University of California, San Francisco; Sept. 18, 2007, Circulation


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. One in Three Heart Attack Patients Have No Chest Pains
2. Epileptic Seizures Can Be Duec to Heart Problem
3. Bypass Heart Surgery Performed Without General Anesthesia
4. New CPR Guidelines issued by Heart Association
5. White Cells Count Can Predict Heart Attack Death Risk
6. Vitamins-The answer to Heart Disease?
7. Fight Heart disease and Pain with Meditation
8. Heart disease in the newborn is related to maternal malnutrition
9. New drug to treat Heart Attack and damaged tissue
10. Starvation in pregnant women can cause heart disease to their children
11. Individuals with sleep related breathing disorders more prone to heart disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... ... A. Kevin Spann Insurance, a New York-based firm offering insurance and financial ... charity drive to raise funds that will benefit the Marine Corps League. , The ... FMF Corpsmen. Working closely with the MCL, the A. Kevin Spann team plans to ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Delete® - Tattoo Removal and Laser Salon Offers ... Season. Save Up To 33% Off Botox® and Juvederm® Products Now Through December 31, ... with Delightful Deals on Botox® and Juvederm® just in time for the ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Gensuite is honored to ... the Best New Product Launch category. Gensuite’s entry on their EZ Scan feature ... Global Events & Training Group is a professional event and training provider based ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... “Walking With God: Inspirational Lessons from My ... the reader to be aware of God's direction in their lives. “Walking With God: ... retired teacher and active church leader. , Sanford says, “I enjoy sharing ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... NuevaCare, a leading home care agency based ... announce new city-specific pages as part of its ambitious website relaunch. As Bay Area ... first, for local agencies serving their city. The new site has several key city-specific ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... VILLAGE, Calif. , Dec. 6, 2016 ... privately held, clinical-stage medical dermatology and aesthetics ... plc, a privately held specialty pharmaceutical company ... common inflammatory skin conditions, including psoriasis, atopic ... of the agreement, Sienna will make an ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... JOLLA, Calif. , Dec. 6, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development ... new drug development candidates at its R&D day, ... The first candidate, RGLS5040, is an anti-miR targeting ... The second candidate, RGLS4326, is an anti-miR targeting ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... - InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CSE: IN; OTCQB: ... in the use of cannabinoids for the treatment ... 2015 InMed initiated its COPD program using its ... potential active compounds that can be useful for ... assays using human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1 cell line), ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: