Navigation Links
Healthy Habits May Help Childhood Cancer Survivors Avoid Chronic Ills
Date:7/28/2014

MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Following a healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors reduce their risk for chronic health issues, a new study indicates.

Researchers suggested that children with cancer and adults who survived childhood cancer should be educated about how their diet and certain behaviors could affect their health in the future.

"These findings are important because they indicate that adults who were treated for cancer as children have the opportunity to influence their own health outcomes," said one of the researchers, Kirsten Ness of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.

Adults who had cancer when they were children are at greater risk for metabolic syndrome -- a group of risk factors that increases the likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes, stroke and other health problems.

People with metabolic syndrome have some combination of the following: high blood pressure; abnormal cholesterol; high blood sugar levels; and increased body fat.

The new study, published online July 28 in Cancer, found that maintaining a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors' risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

For the study, the researchers analyzed information on nearly 1,600 childhood cancer survivors who were cancer-free for at least 10 years.

"This study is unique because of the large, well characterized population of survivors of various diagnoses that we studied, many years from their original cancer diagnosis," said Ness in a journal news release.

Participants were given questionnaires and tests to determine whether or not they followed the seven healthy lifestyle recommendations issued by the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research. In order to be considered compliant, they had to follow at least four of the recommendations.

Overall, the study revealed that nearly 32 percent of the participants had metabolic syndrome. Of those who followed the healthy lifestyle recommendations, 27 percent had the condition.

Men and women who didn't follow the recommendations were more than twice as likely to have metabolic syndrome as those who did follow the guidelines, the investigators found.

Those healthy lifestyle recommendations include:

  • No smoking
  • Maintaining a healthy body weight
  • Getting regular physical activity
  • Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables
  • Limiting intake of sugar, alcohol, red meat and salt

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about metabolic syndrome.

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, July 28, 2014

--


'/>"/>
Copyright©2014 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Social ties have mixed impact on encouraging healthy behaviors in low-income areas
2. Life expectancy and healthy life years in the European Union, 2008-2010
3. Healthy Lifestyle Choices Could Cut Cancer Rates: Report
4. Healthy Behaviors Extend Life After Cancer, Experts Say
5. Healthy Weight Loss May Also Cut Your Cancer Risk
6. Study Redefines What a Healthy Vagina Is
7. Healthy Dieting in Pregnancy May Be Helpful
8. McMaster University researchers discover drug destroys human cancer stem cells but not healthy ones
9. Amazon Tribe Gives Clues to Heart-Healthy Lifestyles
10. Too much vitamin D can be as unhealthy as too little
11. Healthy Brain Connections Help Maintain Intellect in Old Age
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Healthy Habits May Help Childhood Cancer Survivors Avoid Chronic Ills
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... Paragon ... transparent, verifiable database to help the cannabis industry move towards greater legitimacy. By ... deliver a faster technology with lower fees. Paragon will build a fully verifiable ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 19, 2017 , ... The digital health and telemedicine ... pending recognition status from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) to ... live video conferencing. , The DPP resulted from clinical work conducted by ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 19, 2017 , ... Praeclarus Press has launched ... illustrations show the diversity of the breastfeeding mothers, using bright colors and ... sizes. These illustrations are also available on tote bags, notepads, smartphone cases, clocks, ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 19, 2017 , ... ... diverse community of over 1,000 passionate employees, caregivers, volunteers, thought leaders, researchers, educators ... Stonegate changed ownership, it was time to refresh the carpeting with the goal ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... ... “Congratulations! It's A Boy! God’s Gift: A Story of Love”: a children’s ... It's A Boy! God’s Gift: A Story of Love” is the creation of published ... Published by Christian Faith Publishing, Dale Anthony and Rachael Anthony’s new book is a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/4/2017)... , Aug. 3, 2017  Agragen, LLC, ... company active in the biopharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and aquacultural ... development of its lead drug candidates, AGR131.  This ... proinflammatory cytokine from the blood of patients suffering ... and inflammatory bowel disease. ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... AROMAS, Calif. , Aug. 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... by Continental Who,s Who as a Pinnacle Lifetime ... currently the Key Account Manager at Turing Pharmaceuticals, ... communications, negotiations, troubleshooting and relationship building.                ... has more than 25 years of experience ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... 2017  Life Flight Network and PeaceHealth Oregon Network announced ... care and operational efficiency for patients at hospitals in ... Cottage Grove , and Florence, Oregon ... Life Flight Network work collaboratively to move patients who require ... a time sensitive emergency exists. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: