Navigation Links
Health disparities among US African-American and Hispanic men cost economy more than $450 billion
Date:1/22/2014

African-American men incurred $341.8 billion in excess medical costs due to health inequalities between 2006 and 2009, and Hispanic men incurred an additional $115 billion over the four-year period, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, published this week in the International Journal of Men's Health, looks at the direct and indirect costs associated with health inequalities and projects the potential cost savings of eliminating these disparities for minority men in the U.S.

"Health disparities have a devastating impact on individuals and families, and they also affect society as a whole," said Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., PhD, lead author of the study and Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Director of the Program for Research on Men's Health in the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions. "Quantifying the economic impact of health inequalities among men highlights how enormous a societal problem this is."

Researchers used data from the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality's 2006-2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to determine the prevalence of a variety of health statuses and conditions (for example, fair/poor health, obesity, diabetes, heart disease) among each racial/ethnic group (African American, Asian, Hispanic and white). This information was incorporated in statistical models to estimate the total direct medical costs and the proportion of costs incurred due to health disparities for each group. The direct medical expenditures for African-American men over the four-year period totaled $447.6 billion; and 5.4 percent, or $24.2 billion, were excess costs attributed to health disparities. There were no excess direct costs due to health disparities for the other racial/ethnic groups over the four year period.

The indirect costs of lower worker productivity due to illness and premature death were calculated using data from MEPS and the CDC's National Vital Statistics System. Over the four-year period, these factors cost the economy a total of $436.3 billionlower worker productivity due to illness contributed $28 billion in excess costs, and premature death contributed $408.3 billion. Of the total indirect costs, African-American men accounted for $317.6 billion, or 72 percent; indirect costs totaled $115 billion for Hispanic men and $3.6 billion for Asian men.

"These stark findings underscore the fact that we can't afford to overlook men's health disparities that exist in this country," added Thorpe. "The cost to societyboth moral and economicis staggering."


'/>"/>

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. You Survived Cancer: Now Pay Attention to Your Overall Health
2. NIH awards $20 million over 5 years to train next generation of global health researchers
3. Weill Cornell Medical College establishes Center for Healthcare Informatics and Policy
4. Esophageal Cancer Surgery Can Leave Lingering Health Problems, Study Says
5. Climate Change Could Be Tough on Seniors Health: Study
6. Supporting LGB children may influence their long-term health, BU study finds
7. U.S. Spends Too Little on Public Health Initiatives: Report
8. Optimal care of bariatric surgery patients vital for long-term health and well-being
9. Timing pregnancy an important health concern for women
10. Unique approach needed to accurately assess health of young adult cancer survivors
11. Social ties have mixed impact on encouraging healthy behaviors in low-income areas
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Dickinson Insurance and Financial ... financial preparation services, is providing an update on a charitable event that began ... Rescue is a locally recognized nonprofit that provides shelter and care for animals ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... While it’s often important ... problem. Fortunately, an inventor from Austin, Texas, has identified a solution. , She developed ... darkness or restricted lighting. As such, it eliminates the need to turn on a ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... the certification process to promote standards of excellence for the field of eating ... for March 22 – 25, 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Randall, PharmD ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, PharmD ’17, along with clinical associate ... primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases during the 15th Annual Women’s Health Conference. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which specializes in the ... facility as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , Apple Rehab participated ... Emergency Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care Mutual Aid Plan ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ., a recognized leader ... that it has been ranked #1 by its users for ... Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized as the top-ranked ... and medical centers over 200 beds and holds one of ... user survey history. ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... , Sept. 18, 2017 ... fields of bioinformatics and immune engineering, today ... protective avian influenza A (H7N9) vaccine. ... related to seasonal influenza and presents a ... on prior exposure to be effective. Using ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... PARIS and NEW YORK , Sept. 12, ... ethical performance ratings for global supply chains, has published the first annual ... the CSR performance of more than 20,400 companies evaluated by EcoVadis, based ... years 2015 and 2016. ... EcoVadis Global CSR Risk & Performance Index ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: