Navigation Links
Happiness Protects Your Heart

Those most content reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease, researchers say ,,

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who are enthusiastic and content are less likely to develop heart disease than less happy people, researchers from Columbia University report.

In this prospective study of the relationship between happiness and heart disease, researchers concluded that if everyone did more of the things that made them happy, they could significantly reduce their risk of heart attack and angina.

"We were excited to discover in a large population-based sample of adults that the tendency to express positive emotion predicted fewer heart attacks across a period of 10 years," said lead researcher Karina Davidson, director of Columbia's Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health.

"The study suggests that those people who are happier have heart-protective outcomes," she added.

Davidson speculated that several factors may combine to producing this effect. Happier people tend to sleep better and to practice more heart-healthy behaviors, she said.

"But they may also be physiologically different than those of us who are more unhappy," Davidson said.

In addition, these people tend to have less stress in their lives and handle the stress they do have better than less happy people, she added.

The report is published in the Feb. 18 issue of the European Heart Journal.

For the study, Davidson's team followed 1,739 men and women for 10 years. These people all participated in the 1995 Nova Scotia Health Survey. At the start of the study, everyone had their risk for heart disease assessed.

In addition, researchers looked for symptoms of depression, hostility, anxiety and the expression of positive emotions -- known as "positive affect." This is defined as the experience of pleasurable emotions, such as joy, happiness, excitement, enthusiasm and contentment, according to Davidson.

The researchers found that over the study period the happier someone was, the less likely he or she was to develop heart disease. In fact, for every point on a five-point scale that measured positive affect, the risk of heart disease dropped 22 percent.

However, unhappy people had a 22 percent increased risk of having a heart attack or chronic chest pain, compared with those who were somewhat happy. These somewhat happy people also had a 22 percent increased risk for heart problems compared with people who were moderately happy, the researchers noted.

People who were generally happy, but had a few symptoms of depression, did not see these symptoms increase their lowered risk for heart disease, Davidson added.

Davidson noted that she is involved in a clinical trial to test whether changing people's happiness level improves their heart health.

"In the meantime, it is good for one's quality of life and mental health to engage in happy behaviors or things that give you pleasure on a daily basis -- and many of us here in North America don't do that," she said.

Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles and co-director of the UCLA Preventative Cardiology Program, said that "negative emotions such as depression, anxiety and anger have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality."

Some, but not all previous studies, have suggested that positive affect is associated with lower risk of disease and improved clinical outcomes, he added.

"This new, large population-based study suggests that positive affect is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease over 10 years independent of other cardiovascular risk factors and independent of depression and other negative affects," Fonarow said.

"These findings are intriguing. The clinical significance will depend on whether it can be subsequently shown that interventions designed to increase positive affect can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease," he added.

However, while maintaining a positive affect may be one factor associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, regular exercise, not smoking, a healthy diet and maintaining optimal blood pressure, cholesterol levels and body weight are well-established and essential, Fonarow noted.

More information

For more information on heart disease, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Karina Davidson, Ph.D., Herbert Irving Associate Professor of Medicine & Psychiatry, and director, Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles, and director, Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, and co-director, UCLA Preventative Cardiology Program; Feb. 18, 2010, European Heart Journal

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Naked Juice Brings Consumers Happiness by the Billions With First 100% Juice Smoothie Containing Probiotics
2. Leading neuroscientist seeks beauty, love and happiness
3. Seniors No Strangers to Happiness
4. More marital happiness = less sleep complaints
5. New PurinaCare(TM) Pet Health Insurance Helps Offer Dogs and Cats a Lifetime of Health and Happiness
6. The International Health and Fitness Symposium Releases The People's Guide to Health, Happiness and Longevity
7. A Different Way of Thinking for a Fulfilling Life: New Book Offers Practical Guidance for Rethinking Happiness and Nurturing Self-Love
8. Happiness Spreads Through African Villages Thanks to Growing Contributions from Long Term Care Insurance Professionals
9. December 2008 Mayo Clinic Womens HealthSource Highlights Happiness, Dementia and Smoking
10. One Simple Step to Obtain Health, Happiness, and Longevity in 2009
11. New PurinaCare(R) Pet Health Library Helps Pet Owners Provide a Lifetime of Health and Happiness for Their Dogs and Cats
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/10/2015)... , ... October 10, 2015 , ... The sixth annual ... on the growth of cybercrime costs for US companies. The New York Times broke ... 6th. With averages showing increases hovering around 20% among the companies surveyed, it only ...
(Date:10/10/2015)... Arbor, MI (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2015 , ... ... City, MO. , On the heels of the release of the Institute of ... of tools, and their integration with Cerner solutions that assist healthcare providers and consumers ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... ... October 09, 2015 , ... The American ... Dean for Graduate Medical Education J. Michael Finley, DO, as the recipient of ... selected for his impact on graduate medical education opportunities for osteopathic residents, and ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... ... October 09, 2015 , ... A new health tool ... Aid, is now available online ( ) – just in time for the ... officially begins in October. However, for many in the U.S., the real start of ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... , ... October 09, 2015 , ... ... a special promotion on Invisalign, the orthodontic system that uses clear, plastic aligners. ... are almost invisible against the teeth, which allow patients to complete treatment in ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
... (HealthDay News) -- Drinking too much alcohol can lead to ... the most common cause of HIV infection and finding ways ... health efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS. Alcohol use has long ... whether unsafe sex associated with alcohol use actually led to ...
... MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors ... treatment with radiation and/or chemotherapy, a new study says. ... and treatment-specific ways that these cancer therapies impair cancer ... Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Fla., ...
... , Researchers at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences ... new method for detailed analyses of electrical activity in ... can help doctors and researchers to better interpret ... considerable steps forward in terms of interpreting for example ...
... has found that alcohol consumption directly impacts a person,s intention to ... the stronger becomes your intention to engage in unsafe sex. ... infection, and it is a main risk factor for the global ... prevent unsafe sex, HIV incidence in most high income countries (such ...
... leukemia patients, own infection-fighting cells appears to protect ... with fludarabine-based chemotherapy, according to new research from ... of Pennsylvania. The new process is a step ... from the commonly prescribed drug, which improves progression-free ...
... Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine report ... physical force contributes to scarring in mice. "Our ... the mechanical environment can directly increase inflammation, which is ... and associate chair of surgery. Mice genetically engineered ...
Cached Medicine News:
(Date:10/9/2015)... -- --> --> ... of an Intellectual Property & Subsidiary Assignment and an Assignment & Assumption ... Corporation, related party, and a majority holder of 88% ... --> These agreements were executed as part of ... and Development components shall now be separate from the ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... 2015  The Centers for Disease Control and ... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Office of Advanced Molecular Detection ... research collaboration to evaluate the performance of Edico ... research collaboration is to evaluate the utility of ... and infectious disease applications. This collaboration will also ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... Texas , Oct. 9, 2015   Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, ... from the TELESTAR Phase 3 clinical study of telotristat etiprate ... Tumor Society annual symposium to be held from October 15-17, ... from interviews with patients who completed the randomized treatment portion ... time in a poster session. --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
... Questcor Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:  QCOR) announced today that executive ... be held August 9-11, 2011 at the InterContinental Boston in ... is scheduled to present an overview of the Company on ... To listen to the audio web cast of the ...
... REDWOOD CITY, Calif., July 28, 2011 Codexis, Inc. ... I. Mizutani, Executive Vice President, Upstream Business, Raizen Energia ... of Directors. Mr. Mizutani serves as the Board representative ... holds approximately 16% of Codexis, outstanding shares of common ...
Cached Medicine Technology:
Optipress II Automated Blood Component Extractor for the standardized separation of whole blood into high purity individual components...
... Distriman is a ... that is designed to ... used with Gilson DistriTip ... polypropylene syringes with level ...
The Eppendorf Maxipettor is a continuously adjustable pipette for precise pipetting of volumes up to 10 ml (in 10 l increments). Even liquids with a high vapor pressure or viscosity can be pipetted w...
... Plus, a handheld manual dispenser, is ideal ... long series pipetting. Its increased volume selection ... research tasks, and its smooth handling reduces ... The nine Combitips allow a wider range ...
Medicine Products: