Navigation Links
HIV shifting from most to least educated in sub-Saharan Africa
Date:1/15/2008

HIV infections appear to be concentrating among the least educated people in Africa, reversing previous patterns which saw higher levels of infection among the most educated, according to a study published today in the journal AIDS.

A team led by Dr. James Hargreaves of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) sought to assess whether the profile of people infected with HIV is changing over time in sub-Saharan Africa.

HIV has spread rapidly in Africa, the worlds poorest region, and is widely characterised as a disease of poverty. However, the situation is more complex than this. In 2001, an LSHTM team, also led by Dr. Hargreaves, found that before 1996, individuals with the highest levels of education were often more likely to be infected with HIV than less educated people, perhaps because they were wealthier, more mobile and had broader networks of sexual partners.

The new article updates this work and draws a different conclusion. The LSHTM team screened over 4000 research papers to identify relevant data collected all around the world, eventually identifying 36 studies conducted in 11 countries between 1987 and 2003 representing data on over 200,000 individuals.

They found that in data from after 1996 more studies found a lower risk of HIV infection among the most educated. Where data over time were available from the same place, HIV prevalence fell more consistently among highly educated groups than among less educated groups. HIV prevalence sometimes rose among the less educated even while it fell among the overall population.

Dr. Hargreaves comments: At the time of our initial review, we speculated that, as HIV education campaigns developed in sub-Saharan Africa, the most educated, empowered members of society would be the first to adopt protective behaviours such as reducing numbers of partners and using condoms. And since HIV campaigns are often delivered within schools, we also speculated that those who stayed in school longer might be exposed to more health education messages and as a result adopt protective behaviours. We predicted that, in the absence of effective interventions that engaged the least educated, HIV would, over time, increasingly become concentrated in this group.

These results are partly good news. They confirm that HIV prevalence is falling, sometimes quite steeply, in some groups of people. This is probably at least partly because of the global response to the epidemic so far. But our new study also indicates that our fears were justified: HIV is increasingly becoming concentrated among the most vulnerable members of society. We conclude that more needs to be done to encourage educational achievement across the whole of society if we are to stem the tide of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa.


'/>"/>

Contact: Lindsay Wright
lindsay.wright@lshtm.ac.uk
020-792-72073
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. AUDIO from Medialink and GlaxoSmithKline: Shifting Your Focus for a Lighter, Healthier New Year
2. Shape Shifting on Veterans Day
3. Psychiatrists: Least religious but most interested in patients religion
4. Caffeine Survey Reveals Most, Least Caffeinated Cities
5. Psychiatrists are the least religious of all physicians
6. Dementia in More Educated Hits Later But Harder
7. Sub-Saharan Africa: the population emergency
8. The Reality of Pregnancy in Sub-Saharan Africa: Author Shares Truth About Pregnancy in a Region Where 1 in 16 Women Die from Complications
9. Susan G. Komen for the Cures Circle of Promise and The Links, Incorporated Unite to Rewrite the Story on African Americans and Breast Cancer
10. Africa focuses on GMES
11. Cookie Johnson and Abbott Bring I Stand With Magic: Campaign to End Black AIDS to Los Angeles to Educate African-American Women on HIV/AIDS
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... Maryland (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Angels is actively feeding the Frederick area economy by obtaining investment capital for ... over the past 2½ years that have already resulted in more than a ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... the upcoming 2016 Miss Arizona pageant as its official Medspa Sponsor. Dr. Josh ... Mesa, and Chandler, Arizona. , Dr. Olson says the decision to support ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Today, InhaleLabs.com (Inhale) offilially launched its site, which aims to ... high quality water pipes within an ideal price range. The site is completely free ... two brothers, Nick and Mike Hunter, who use medical cannabis to heal ailments of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... An ... that may expose a possible link between head and neck cancer in individuals with ... in the study were evaluated based on whether they had gum disease, brushed their ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... McKinney, Texas (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... the special operations community. He turned towards the water to find peace and set ... funds for a veterans charity and turned to the internet. He came across the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. ... biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and ... enrollment in its ongoing randomized HOPE-Duchenne clinical trial ... of its 24-patient target. Capricor expects the trial ... of 2016, and to report top line data ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Bracket , ... launch its next generation clinical outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) ... held on June 26 – 30, 2016 in ... first electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment product of its kind to ... #715. Bracket eCOA 6.0 is a flexible platform ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... and INDIANAPOLIS , June ... receiving a Lilly Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any ... scholarship winners, announced today online at www.diabetesscholars.org ... type 1 diabetes stand in the way of academic ... supported the Foundation,s scholarship program since 2012, and continues ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: