Navigation Links
HIV drugs, Abacavir and Didanosine increase the risk of heart attack

A study to assess the adverse effects of anti-retroviral drugs shows that two widely-used HIV drugs are associated with an increased risk of heart attack/the formation of blood clots in the heart. With the use of Didanosine, the risk of developing a heart attack increases by 49%, with Abacavir; the increased risk is 90%. The effect is most pronounced in patients with a high underlying cardiovascular risk. The research findings also show that the adverse effect is reversible, if patients discontinue use of these particular drugs.

The scientists who conducted the study recommend that patients on Abacavir or Didanosine should evaluate their underlying cardiovascular risk with their doctor and discuss whether any changes to their drug regime are warranted. The scientists strongly urge HIV patients not to stop taking Abacavir or Didanosine, before they have consulted their doctor.

Since the study began in 1999, D:A:D (the Data Collection of Adverse effects of Anti-HIV Drugs Study) has examined the side-effects of anti-retroviral drugs, including a possible increase in the risk of heart attack. Recent analysis has focused on a class of drugs, not previously examined, known as the nucleoside analogues, which inhibit the HIV virus by preventing it from multiplying. This class of drugs includes Stavudine, Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Abacavir and Didanosine. Only the last two drugs in the analysis were shown to have an adverse effect with respect to heart disease.

The side-effects associated with Didanosine and Abacavir are, naturally, most significant for HIV-infected patients who already have a high underlying cardiovascular risk. The drug effect increases an individual persons underlying risk by a factor of 1.9 for a person on Abacavir, and 1.49 for a person on Didanosine. For a person with a low underlying risk, this increase in risk is still negligible, but for someone with a high underlying risk, this could have serious consequences. The study shows, however, that the risk of heart attack is removed once patients stop taking the drugs. This seems to be the case, regardless of how long these drugs have been used by patients.

The D:A:D study involves over 33,000 patients from Europe, Australia and Asia. The study evaluates the incidence of heart attack among HIV-infected patients undergoing anti-retroviral treatment, and thereby enables scientists to determine whether side-effects of the anti-retroviral drugs, including cardiovascular disease, are increased in the long-term.


Contact: Communication Department
University of Copenhagen

Related medicine news :

1. Targeting gut bugs could revolutionize future drugs, say researcher
2. MicroRNAs may be key to HIVs ability to hide, evade drugs, Jefferson scientists find
3. American Pacific Reports Revenue Increase of 34% and Net Income of $2.9 Million for Fiscal 2008 First Quarter
4. Medical Cost Increases to Accelerate Worldwide Over Next Five Years, Watson Wyatt Poll Finds
5. Otter Tail Corporation Reports Record Revenues and Net Income From Continuing Operations for 2007; Earnings Per Share of $1.78; Board Approves Dividend Increase
6. UKs largest charity announces increase in funding to almost £4 billion over 5 years
7. CRH Medical Corporation announces substantial increase in patient visits
8. Will This President Never Learn? Another Budget -- Another Increase to Ineffective Abstinence-Only Programs
9. FY2009 Budget Increases International Development Funding but Does Little for Domestic Nutrition Programs
10. ATS Medical Expects Fourth Quarter Revenue to Increase by Approximately 32%
11. Natural Nutrition Operating Subsidiary Reports Record 29% Increase in Revenues for 2007 of $17,460,000
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The rapid speed at which ... age, more care is needed, especially with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive conditions ... overworked. The forgotten part of this equation: 80 percent of medical care occurs ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Orange County, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... holiday season , The company is offering customers 10% off of their purchase of ... purchase any treatment at full price. According to a company spokesperson. “Finding lice is ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... VVA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... motto of progress through sharing, the 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing ... The conference will begin on Sunday, March 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... Health-E-minds, an innovative online platform for mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated ... This partnership will bridge the knowledge gap experienced by parents and bring advice ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... Avid collector, ... Ann Arbor Michigan boxing style concert posters. This is one of Joplin's most famous ... Canterbury House at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The According to Hawley, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... 26, 2015 ... the "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing ... and Sales Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation ... to their offering. --> ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... WILMINGTON, North Carolina , 26 november ... Laboratories, Inc. (AAIPharma/CML) kondigt de geplande investering ... de uitbreiding van de laboratoria en het ... . De uitbreiding zal resulteren in ... waarmee wordt voldaan aan de groeiende behoeften ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 --> ... to use SyMRI to find optimal contrast weighting of MRI ... metastases, and has signed a research agreement with SyntheticMR in ... hospital. Using SyMRI, it is possible to generate multiple contrast ... after the patient has left, thus making it possible to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: