Navigation Links
HIV Drug Might Spur Resistant Strains of Virus
Date:8/5/2008

Used during breast-feeding to prevent mom-to-baby transmission, nevirapine could have downside, study finds

TUESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The drug nevirapine -- widely used in developing countries to prevent transmission of HIV from mothers to babies -- persists in the breast milk and blood of mothers, a new Stanford University study finds.

That, in turn, could increase the risk that they and their children will develop drug-resistant strains of HIV, the researchers added.

The scientists looked at 32 HIV-positive pregnant women in Zimbabwe who received a single dose of nevirapine when they went into labor. The women had received no other treatment for their infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Two weeks after delivery, more than half of the women still had detectable levels of the drug in their blood, and two-thirds had measurable levels of nevirapine in their breast milk. The longer the drug stays in the body, the more likely it is to develop drug-resistant mutations, the Stanford researchers said.

At the start of the study, none of the women had drug-resistant HIV strains. But two months after they gave birth, one-third of the women had drug-resistant strains in their blood, and 65 percent had drug-resistant strains in their breast milk as well, and could pass those strains to their babies during breast-feeding. Women with more advanced HIV were most likely to develop drug-resistant strains.

The study was expected to be presented Tuesday at the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City.

"In the short term, nevirapine is better than nothing. But in the long term, I'm concerned about conferring resistance. If you're talking about resistance on a broad scale, it could jeopardize future treatment for mothers and infants," principal investigator Dr. David Katzenstein, a professor of infectious diseases, said in a Stanford news release.

Nevirapine and another drug called zidovudine (AZT) play a major role in public health programs to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in developing nations. Worldwide, the drugs have been used as preventive tools in nearly 900,000 women and infants.

Access to better antitretroviral treatment would reduce the risk of the development of drug-resistant HIV, said study first author Dr. Seble Kassaye, an instructor in infectious diseases.

"[The study] reinforces the need to treat these women with combination therapy, thereby providing better prevention for the infant, while providing better treatment for the mother. Public health efforts should continue to expand combination therapy so that mothers and babies aren't left vulnerable to drug resistance," Kassaye said in the news release.

More information

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more about HIV and pregnancy.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Stanford University, news release, Aug. 5, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Fish Oil Might Help Relieve MS
2. HIV Drug Might Fight Cancer
3. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
4. Vitamin C Plus Fat Might Spur Cancer
5. Mathematics might save you a trip to the ER
6. Veggies Might Ward Off Age-Linked Vision Woes
7. Rating your pain from 0 to 10 might not help your doctor
8. Blood Marker Might Help Spot Early Liver Cancer
9. Hushed Genes Might Mean Higher Lung Cancer Risk
10. Mathematics might save you a trip to the ER
11. More Prostate Cancers Might Be Prevented
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
HIV Drug Might Spur Resistant Strains of Virus
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... share this important news! AHCC and the Home Health and Hospice ICD-10 Transition ... designee for official ICD coding guidance and clarifications, to address concerns over the ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... The ... held annually in this country. The AutismOne 2016 Conference, which is being held May ... they often won’t hear elsewhere about helpful interventions and causes of chronic illness in ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... MyDecision™ empowers employers and organizations with the tools and information to lower the ... elements to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare benefits by as much ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... 06, 2016 , ... With the FCPX LUT: Summer pack from ... footage. A LUT is a Lookup Table that contains a mathematical formula for modifying ... the table. By manipulating each pixel, LUT's can change each color range differently, it ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Love ... long-stem roses in a variety of colors, assortments and packaging. This staple for Valentine’s ... any King Kullen location. , For Valentine’s Day, not only are long-stem roses ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... PUNE, India , February 8, 2016 ... to a new market research report "Ablation Technologies Market ... Application (Csardiovascular, Cancer, Pain Management, Cosmetic Surgery, Ophthalmology, Gynecology) ... report studies the global market over the forecast period ... reach $4.44 Billion by 2020, at CAGR of 10.5% ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... In a historic vote among its members this weekend, the ... cannabis cultivation facility and dispensary on tribal land near Southampton ... as a provider for patients in the state,s Medical Cannabis Program. ... provider for patients in the state,s Medical Cannabis Program. --> ... project and pursue designation from the State of New York ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Feb. 8, 2016 http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/x6mkjm/knee ... "Knee Reconstruction Devices Market by Product Type (Primary ... Geography (U.S., Canada, Eu-5, Japan, Bric, Turkey, Indonesia ... report to their offering. --> ... "Knee Reconstruction Devices Market by Product Type ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: