Navigation Links
HIV Drug Might Spur Resistant Strains of Virus
Date:8/5/2008

Used during breast-feeding to prevent mom-to-baby transmission, nevirapine could have downside, study finds

TUESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The drug nevirapine -- widely used in developing countries to prevent transmission of HIV from mothers to babies -- persists in the breast milk and blood of mothers, a new Stanford University study finds.

That, in turn, could increase the risk that they and their children will develop drug-resistant strains of HIV, the researchers added.

The scientists looked at 32 HIV-positive pregnant women in Zimbabwe who received a single dose of nevirapine when they went into labor. The women had received no other treatment for their infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Two weeks after delivery, more than half of the women still had detectable levels of the drug in their blood, and two-thirds had measurable levels of nevirapine in their breast milk. The longer the drug stays in the body, the more likely it is to develop drug-resistant mutations, the Stanford researchers said.

At the start of the study, none of the women had drug-resistant HIV strains. But two months after they gave birth, one-third of the women had drug-resistant strains in their blood, and 65 percent had drug-resistant strains in their breast milk as well, and could pass those strains to their babies during breast-feeding. Women with more advanced HIV were most likely to develop drug-resistant strains.

The study was expected to be presented Tuesday at the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City.

"In the short term, nevirapine is better than nothing. But in the long term, I'm concerned about conferring resistance. If you're talking about resistance on a broad scale, it could jeopardize future treatment for mothers and infants," principal investigator Dr. David Katzenstein, a professor of infectious diseases, said in a Stanford news release.

Nevirapine and another drug called zidovudine (AZT) play a major role in public health programs to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in developing nations. Worldwide, the drugs have been used as preventive tools in nearly 900,000 women and infants.

Access to better antitretroviral treatment would reduce the risk of the development of drug-resistant HIV, said study first author Dr. Seble Kassaye, an instructor in infectious diseases.

"[The study] reinforces the need to treat these women with combination therapy, thereby providing better prevention for the infant, while providing better treatment for the mother. Public health efforts should continue to expand combination therapy so that mothers and babies aren't left vulnerable to drug resistance," Kassaye said in the news release.

More information

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more about HIV and pregnancy.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Stanford University, news release, Aug. 5, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Fish Oil Might Help Relieve MS
2. HIV Drug Might Fight Cancer
3. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
4. Vitamin C Plus Fat Might Spur Cancer
5. Mathematics might save you a trip to the ER
6. Veggies Might Ward Off Age-Linked Vision Woes
7. Rating your pain from 0 to 10 might not help your doctor
8. Blood Marker Might Help Spot Early Liver Cancer
9. Hushed Genes Might Mean Higher Lung Cancer Risk
10. Mathematics might save you a trip to the ER
11. More Prostate Cancers Might Be Prevented
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
HIV Drug Might Spur Resistant Strains of Virus
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed ... by inspiring human interest stories, courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health ... the industry, from leading advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett Learning. , Jones ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... Wis. (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... $90,000 in scholarships to students studying complementary medicine. Allison Outerbridge is this year’s ... accepted her award on May 18 at the university’s Student Leadership Awards ceremony. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports ... Yellen and company to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according ... Robinson College of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... W.S. Badger Co. Inc ., the maker of certified ... Work Works Award for its use of effective workplace strategies to increase business and ... administered by the Families and Work Institute (FWI) and the Society for Human Resource ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Intalere, the healthcare industry leader ... its inaugural Member Conference at the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas, Nev., May ... of America’s healthcare providers. , The conference was highlighted by the announcement of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016 MedDay, ... disorders, announces that an oral presentation entitled "High doses of ... MS-SPI trial" will be given by Professor Ayman Tourbah ... 2nd Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in ... and related disorders 3" will take place on Sunday, 29 ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... Markt gebracht, die es Ärzten erlaubt, ihre Expertise ... behandeln: MDLinking kombiniert Live Streaming mit einer Instant-Messaging-Funktion ... zu kommunizieren. Mediziner in Europa, Afrika, Asien und ... bereits für die Plattform registriert. Information ...
(Date:5/24/2016)...   , Study met both ... in , Excellent plus Good ... of the ascending colon   ,      ... announced new positive data from the phase III MORA study for ... litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both primary endpoints showing ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: