Navigation Links
H1N1 Flu Virus Detected in Seals Off California Coast
Date:5/16/2013

THURSDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Flu-causing H1N1 virus has been discovered in marine animals -- specifically seals -- for the first time.

After the human H1N1 influenza pandemic began in 2009, researchers from the University of California, Davis, detected the virus in free-ranging northern elephant seals off the central California coastline.

"We thought we might find influenza viruses, which have been found before in marine mammals, but we did not expect to find pandemic H1N1," study lead author Tracey Goldstein, an associate professor with the university's One Health Institute and Wildlife Health Center, said in a university news release. "This shows influenza viruses can move among species."

The H1N1 virus originated in pigs, and the resulting infection was known as swine flu.

"The study of influenza virus infections in unusual hosts, such as elephant seals, is likely to provide us with clues to understand the ability of influenza virus to jump from one host to another and initiate pandemics," Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, director of the Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City, said in the news release.

The new findings were published May 15 in the journal PLoS ONE.

In conducting the study, the researchers tested nasal swabs from more than 900 marine mammals from 10 different species off the Pacific Coast from Alaska to California between 2009 and 2011.

The H1N1 virus was identified in two northern elephant seals. Despite being infected with the virus, neither seal had any symptoms. Antibodies to the virus also were detected in 28 other elephant seals, suggesting exposure to the virus was widespread.

"H1N1 was circulating in humans in 2009," Goldstein said. "The seals on land in early 2010 tested negative before they went to sea, but when they returned from sea in spring 2010, they tested positive. So the question is: Where did it come from?"

The infected seals were tracked by satellite. The researchers said exposure to H1N1 likely occurred while the seals were at sea foraging in the northeast Pacific Ocean off the continental shelf.

Since marine animals could be infected with H1N1 without showing any signs that they are sick, the researchers said their findings are particularly important for people who work with or handle marine animals. Taking precautions, such as wearing gloves, when working with these animals can help prevent the spread of disease both to and from humans, Goldstein said.

Today, the World Health Organization reports that H1N1 is under control and behaves as a seasonal virus.

More information

Visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to learn more about H1N1.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of California, Davis, news release, May 15, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Investigators trace of role reusable grocery bag in norovirus outbreak
2. 16th-century Korean mummy provides clue to hepatitis B virus genetic code
3. New study shows why swine flu virus develops drug resistance
4. Vygone Introduces A New Zapper For Effective Relief From Herpes Virus Related Skin Problems
5. Vygone Presents A New Product To Deal With Genital Warts And Other Herpes Virus Related Skin Problems
6. Moffitt researchers find cutaneous human papillomavirus infection a risk factor for skin cancer
7. Hepatitis C Virus Levels Higher in Certain Injection Drug Users
8. Antibodies for new rotavirus vaccines
9. SEARCH study shows 1-year drop in HIV virus levels in rural Ugandan parish after campaign
10. Human papillomavirus types do not replace others after large-scale vaccination
11. Only 1 in 4 Americans With HIV Has Virus Under Control: CDC
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
H1N1 Flu Virus Detected in Seals Off California Coast
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... An influential resource amongst nurses and professionals in ... lights on the variety of topics detailing why we appreciate nurses in so many ... career has gone from being in a major recession to one of the hottest ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Beleza Medspa has initiated a new ... This is the first time that Coolsculpting is being used for for more than ... to ensure they meet the prescribed body-fat standard, measured by the circumference-based tape method. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at ... company to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev ... of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Georgia (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... certificate in intellectual property (IP) to its specialty academic programs. , Answering to ... the college’s existing certificate programs in health law, and environmental and land use ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... There are nearly 14.5 ... 32 million cancer survivors worldwide. On Sunday, June 5, 2016, communities around the world ... Cancer Survivors Day®. , National Cancer Survivors Day® is an annual worldwide Celebration ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... According to a new market ... 4D), by Therapeutic Area (Oncology, Cosmeceutical/Plastic Surgery), by Application ... Manufacturers, Hospitals/ Clinics) - Forecast to 2021", published by ... for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. This ... 2021 from USD 117.3 Million in 2016, at a ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... 2016 According to market research ... and Demand Forecast to 2022 - Industry Insights by ... published by P&S Market Research, the global insulin delivery ... and it is expected to grow at a CAGR ... pump segment is expected to witness the fastest growth ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... Inivata, a global clinical ... tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis to improve personalised healthcare ... Clive Morris as Chief Medical Officer. ... development programme, scientific collaborations, and through to commercialisation ... in clinical outcomes for patients. Clive ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: