Navigation Links
'Green chemistry' could ease manufacture, boost usefulness of cancer drug
Date:4/2/2009

EAST LANSING, Mich. --- Research by Michigan State University chemist Kevin Walker is paving the way for potentially cleaner, more efficient production of cancer-fighting paclitaxel -- better known as the blockbuster drug Taxol.

First isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew in 1967, paclitaxel has since been made by synthetically modifying an intermediate substance isolated from yew needles using toxic solvents or by fermenting cell cultures.

Walker's method employs natural enzymes instead. "Pharmaceutical companies could reduce the steps involved in making Taxol," he said, "while cutting chemical byproducts."

Walker, an assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology, studies enzymes that assemble the Taxol molecule in Taxus plants. "This process is like painting from a palette," Walker said. "We can add select colors to the palette from which the enzyme chooses, so the molecule can be crafted in a variety of ways. The enzyme does all the work.

"A plant enzyme can do in one step what traditional synthetic construction does in multiples steps," Walker said. "Under our process, the construction of Taxol uses a biological assembly line where each enzyme does its job to create the final product. Particular enzymes on the assembly line can attach slightly different components on the molecular frame to create new-generation Taxol molecules. This can lead to more effective drug variants and eventually better health care treatment."

Taxol "is definitely a frontline drug and is used to treat many cancers," including those of the breast, lung, head and neck, said Barbara Conley, chief of the MSU Department of Medicine's hematology and oncology division.

With a world bulk paclitaxel market generating revenues of $195 million in 1997, potential new uses for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and tuberculosis are expected to help boost the world market 10 percent by 2012, according to Global Industry Analysts Inc.

Walker's team's research was funded by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. "The science and technology of plants and natural systems is becoming increasingly relevant in human medicine as scientists look for greater efficiencies and 'greener' ways of manufacturing drugs and other health care products," said MAES director Steve Pueppke. "Engaging in research that leads to improvements in human and animal health is a large and important part of the MAES mission."

us plants. "This process is like painting from a palette," Walker said. "We can add select colors to the palette from which the enzyme chooses, so the molecule can be crafted in a variety of ways. The enzyme does all the work.

"A plant enzyme can do in one step what traditional synthetic construction does in multiples steps," Walker said. "Under our process, the construction of Taxol uses a biological assembly line where each enzyme does its job to create the final product. Particular enzymes on the assembly line can attach slightly different components on the molecular frame to create new-generation Taxol molecules. This can lead to more effective drug variants and eventually better health care treatment."

Taxol "is definitely a frontline drug and is used to treat many cancers," including those of the breast, lung, head and neck, said Barbara Conley, chief of the MSU Department of Medicine's hematology and oncology division.

With a world bulk paclitaxel market generating revenues of $195 million in 1997, potential new uses for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and tuberculosis are expected to help boost the world market 10 percent by 2012, according to Global Industry Analysts Inc.

Walker's team's research was funded by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. "The science and technology of plants and natural systems is becoming increasingly relevant in human medicine as scientists look for greater efficiencies and 'greener' ways of manufacturing drugs and other health care products," said MAES director Steve Pueppke. "Engaging in research that leads to improvements in human and animal health is a large and important part of the MAES mission."


'/>"/>

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-884-0166
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Green Tea May Brew Up Healthier Skin
2. Lettuce, leafy greens and E. coli
3. Houston Texans Star Players Ahman Green and Matt Schaub Help Easter Seals, Avondale House and Local Families Tackle Autism
4. ComPsych(R) Corp. Announces Health at Work(SM) Award Winners: Sprint, Erie Insurance, City of Naperville and Green Hills Public Library
5. Statement by Robert Greenstein, Executive Director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, on the New Congressional SCHIP Agreement
6. Green Seal Ramps Up Environmental Standard for Household Cleaners
7. PureCart Systems of Green Bay, Wis., is an Honored Recipient of an iParenting Media Award
8. Kaiser Permanente Named Green Electronics Champion by EPA, Green Electronics Council
9. Walgreens Launches New Health Essentials Catalog and Website for AARP Members Featuring More Than 20,000 Health-Related Products
10. Green Pet Products Introduces a New, Innovative Process to the Small Animal and Bird Litter/Bedding Category
11. A History of Philanthropy Made Green-certified Legend Homes an Easy Choice for Extreme Makeover: Home Edition
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
'Green chemistry' could ease manufacture, boost usefulness of cancer drug
(Date:4/29/2016)... Stewart, GA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Monday, May 16, 2016, at its new location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at ... a raffle for a 50-inch Samsung Smart TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Spine Team Texas, a comprehensive spine physician group ... of their physicians has been invited to be a featured speaker at the Texas ... conference on April 30, 2016. , Dr. R. Scott McPherson, a physical medicine ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Mobility Designed is redefining mobility with their patent pending ... Crutch evenly distributes body weight from the elbow to the forearm. In consumer ... than with other crutches. , Co-founders Max and Liliana Younger were inspired to design ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Canadian Celiac Association (CCA), is pleased to announce the launch of the ... nutritional articles, recipes, and more. The purpose of the GFCP Scoop ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Dr. Robert Mondavi, one of ... improve smiles. Cosmetic dentistry is a fast-growing field as more patients are discovering the ... to learn more about the options currently available to them and which ones might ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... 27, 2016 Global  urinalysis ... billion by 2022, according to a new report ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ) , ... efficiency and accuracy delivered by the new generation ... novel urinalysis instruments and consumables. For instance, the ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... announced the launch of a Phase 2 clinical study ... hearing in patients undergoing cochlear implantation (CI) surgery. This ... patients in Germany and ... the middle ear at the time of surgery. "Despite ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... 2016 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC ... the Deutsche Bank 41 st Annual Health Care Conference ... You are invited to listen to the live discussion ... it directly at http://edge.media-server.com/m/p/mr4uxgas . A recorded replay of ... the live event and accessible at the links above until ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: