Navigation Links
Gold Nanospheres Show Promise in 'Boiling' Out Cancer
Date:3/23/2009

Smaller than dust flecks, new therapy 'cooks' bad cells while leaving healthy ones alone

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say that using microscopic gold particles that target melanoma cells and then "boil" them when exposed to certain lighting holds promise as a new treatment for the deadly skin cancer.

The treatment uses gold nanospheres guided directly to the melanoma cells by a special protein fragment called a peptide placed inside the nanosphere. Using a technique known as photoablation therapy (PAT), doctors expose the tumors to near infrared light, causing the nanospheres to heat up and destroy the cancer while leaving healthy tissue alone.

Studies done on mice with melanoma tumors found the peptide-laced nanoparticles were eight times more effective in killing the cancer than those without the peptide guidance system, according to researchers who were to present the findings at an American Chemical Society meeting in Salt Lake City.

"This technique is very promising and exciting," study co-author Jin Zhang, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California in Santa Cruz, said in a news release issued by the conference sponsor. "It's basically like putting a cancer cell in hot water and boiling it to death. The more heat the metal nanospheres generate, the better."

According to the U.S. National Cancer Institute, more than 62,000 cases of melanoma were diagnosed in the United States in 2008, and more than 8,400 people die each year from the disease.

The findings are significant because PAT can accidentally destroy healthy skin cells if the light exposure is not administered carefully and closely monitored. Though the use of metal nanoparticles that are smaller than a speck of dust has improved the technique, researchers have been trying to perfect them to destroy the most cancer with the least damage to healthy cells.

The peptide-loaded nanospheres developed by Zhang appear to have superior ability to find and enter their target and absorb cancer-destroying light. At thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair, they are smaller than most other metal nanoparticles used in PAT and would appear to be safer because gold generally causes fewer negative reactions than other metals that come in contact with the human body, Zhang said.

"Previously developed nanostructures such as nanorods were like chopsticks on the nanoscale," Zhang said. "They can go through the cell membrane but only at certain angles. Our spheres allow a smoother, more efficient flow through the membranes."

Despite the initial success, Zhang said more extensive trails -- eventually involving humans -- are still needed to test the safety and efficacy of the technique before it goes mainstream.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about melanoma.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, March 22, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Hollow gold nanospheres show promise for biomedical and other applications
2. Targeted nanospheres find, penetrate, then fuel burning of melanoma
3. New Parkinsons Treatment Shows Promise in Animals
4. Freezing Kidney Cancers Shows Promise
5. Bioabsorbable stents show promise
6. Drug-Eluting Stents Show Promise for Leg Arteries
7. Optical techniques show continued promise in detecting pancreatic cancer
8. Market for Niche Blockbusters Promises an Attractive Future for Large Pharmaceutical Companies, Indicates Frost & Sullivan
9. Nausea Drug Shows Promise Against Opioid Addiction
10. Gene Therapy Holds Promise for HIV
11. APHA Applauds Congress for Stimulus Bill Compromise; Health Provisions Are Step in Right Direction
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Gold Nanospheres Show Promise in 'Boiling' Out Cancer
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight ... app plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 ... their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ... and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether ... latter, setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, ... their goal. , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Scientific Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants to ... came as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... TX (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... People ... part in Genome magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and ... an award to be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 The vast majority ... outpatient dialysis facility.  Treatments are usually 3 times a ... per visit, including travel time, equipment preparation and wait ... but especially grueling for patients who are elderly and ... skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers for some duration of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... FRANKLIN, Tenn. , June 23, 2016 ... for automating, integrating and transforming the patient ... launch of several innovative new products and ... depth of its revenue cycle offerings. These ... establish more efficient workflows, remain compliant in ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016  The National Pharmaceutical Council (NPC) today ... policy research organization as its newest member.  ... vice president and chief scientific officer, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, ... NPC Board of Directors. ... joined us in support of our efforts to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: