Navigation Links
Glowing TV Screens Keeping Americans Up at Night
Date:6/8/2009

Too much late viewing adding to sleep deficit, researchers warn

MONDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Many generations ago, a dark night sky and fatigue probably signaled it was time to go to sleep.

Today, Conan O'Brien, Jon Stewart and the Desperate Housewives are more influential in determining bedtimes -- and it may be contributing to many Americans' chronic sleep deprivation, a new study says.

In the study, researchers looked at data about the sleep habits and bedtime rituals of 21,475 participants aged 15 or older who completed the American Time Use Survey between 2003 and 2006.

In the two hours around bedtime, TV viewing was the most common activity, accounting for almost 50 percent of the activities undertaken in the time before bed, according to the study to be presented Monday at the Associated Professional Sleep Societies annual meeting, in Seattle.

The finding means that TV -- rather than hours past sunset or biological signs -- has become the most important signal for sleep.

And staying up to catch the end of a favorite show may make people stay up later than they otherwise would. In the morning, their alarm clocks may jar them awake earlier than they would naturally awaken.

These facets of modern life are potentially reducing sleep time below what is physiologically required, the researchers noted in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

"Given the relationship of short sleep duration to health risks, there is concern that many Americans are chronically under-sleeping due to lifestyle choices," study co-author David Dinges, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, said in the news release.

Americans should watch less late-night TV and go to work later in the morning, the researchers suggested.

"While the timing of work may not be flexible, giving up some TV viewing in the evening should be possible to promote adequate sleep," said study co-author Dr. Mathias Basner.

Getting less than seven to eight hours of sleep daily can lead to impaired alertness and has been linked to higher rates of obesity, illness and death. Even so, up to 40 percent of Americans are not getting the recommended amount of sleep at night, according to the news release.

More information

The National Sleep Foundation has more on how many hours of sleep are needed.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, June 8, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Glowing Substance Lights Up Cancer in Mice
2. Doctor-Patient Talks Key to Blacks Getting Cancer Screens
3. Single Men Less Likely to Get Prostate Screens
4. CT Colonography Screens for Cancer, Osteoporosis
5. Colorectal Cancer Screens Detect Unrecognized Disease
6. CT Screens for Lung Cancer Not a Cure-All
7. Cervical Cancer Screens Effective But More Can Be Done
8. Open Biosystems Launches Decode RNAi Viral Screening Pools for Low-Cost Genome-Scale RNAi Screens
9. Patient Navigators Boost Colon Screens in Urban Minorities
10. Earlier Colon Cancer Screens Urged for Smokers
11. Regular Eye Screens Spot Diabetic Vision Trouble
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Glowing TV Screens Keeping Americans Up at Night
(Date:5/28/2016)... AL (PRWEB) , ... May 28, 2016 , ... May ... US Open Martial Arts Fighting Challenge with theme event of “K Warriors” on June ... Mobile, AL 36608. , The event is sponsored and hosted by Shaolin Institute ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... ... Two director-level employees of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey (BCBSNJ) ... The award recognizes businesswomen who excel in their fields and who have made significant ... Long-Term Services and Supports) Program at Horizon NJ Health and Theresa Ponton, Director of ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... An educational campaign aimed at ... stories, courtesy of awareness-driven celebrities and thought leaders. It also provides insight to ... industry leaders such as Bioness. , As patients feel increasingly concerned about ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Each ... studying complementary medicine. Allison Outerbridge is this year’s Life University winner ... 18 at the university’s Student Leadership Awards ceremony. , Outerbridge is approaching her ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... California (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... associated with discovery of thousands of defective respirators, according to court documents and ... the case of William and Becky Tyler v. American Optical Corporation, Case No. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... 2016 According to a new market ... - U.S. Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast ... U.S. was valued at US$ 5.89 Bn in 2014 and ... 2015 to 2023 to reach US$ 7.99 Bn in 2023. ... emerging needle free drug delivery devices and the market is ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... TARE (Transarterial Radio-embolization) Using ... and Overall Decreased Use of Hospital Resource ... specialist healthcare company, has today announced the publication ... of ISPOR (International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes ... using yttrium-90 glass microspheres is associated with cost ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Massachusetts , May 26, 2016 ... (NGS) has matured into an essential life science tool ... and development applications. BCC Research reveals in its new ... a second growth phase, one powered by a range ... fields.      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140723/694805 ) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: