Navigation Links
Global fight against non-communicable diseases should take lessons from HIV-AIDS
Date:9/7/2011

Valuable lessons from the global commitment to fight HIV/AIDS over the past three decades should inspire a new worldwide effort to confront the epidemic of non-communicable diseases, say Emory public health leaders. A UN summit will offer a rare opportunity to generate momentum and resources for global solutions against these diseases.

In a perspective article in this week's New England Journal of Medicine, the Emory experts cite the need for a collective global effort to stem the impact of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and psychiatric disorders. These present major global health, development and societal challenges, say the authors.

A United Nations General Assembly high-level meeting on Sept. 19-20 on global non-communicable diseases will likely draw on experiences against the HIV/AIDS pandemic that began with a "Declaration of Commitment" at a 2001 UN summit, generating awareness and resources, and propelling collective global action.

The perspective's authors are K.M. Venkat Narayan, MD, Ruth and O.C. Hubert Professor of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory; James Curran, MD, dean, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory; Jeffrey P. Koplan, MD, MPH, vice president and director, Emory Global Health Institute and president, International Association of National Public Health Institutes (IANPHI); Carlos del Rio, MD, chair, Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health; and Mohammed K. Ali, MBChB, assistant professor of global health, Rollins School of Public Health.

According to the article, public health experts have learned three primary realities from HIV/AIDS that could be directly translated to non-communicable diseases: research, prevention and treatment efforts must be global rather than national; prevention must be linked to early diagnosis and treatment, connecting community resources with organized health care systems; and prevention efforts must integrate both behavioral and biomedical approaches.

"The lessons learned from global efforts against HIV and AIDS should help us shorten the learning curve for preventing and controlling non-communicable diseases," says first author K.M. Venkat Narayan. "These include the need for good surveillance systems for diseases and risk factors, identifying vulnerable groups, especially in lower resource countries, and a serious global commitment to basic and applied research."

Although non-communicable diseases often disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries, the impact is felt in all countries, and these diseases often strike young and middle-aged people at the peak of their economic productivity.

Combating these diseases will require collective action to promote public health programs including tobacco and trans-fat elimination and health-friendly policies in trade, agriculture, transportation and urban planning, the authors note. They also emphasize the need to combine behavioral and biomedical interventions. Although interventions promoting healthier lifestyles are effective, for some they are insufficient on their own and mainly benefit the most motivated adapters. This leaves large groups of at-risk people who could benefit from proven biomedical interventions such as statins, hypertension and diabetes drugs, or aspirin.

"We've learned from HIV/AIDS that a broad approach including prevention, detection, and treatment both behavioral and medical," is essential, says Curran. "Financial, research, healthcare, and policy commitments all are necessary to combat such a widespread disease challenge."

Without accessibility to early prevention and treatment efforts, countries will end up paying far more for advanced disease. Low-resource countries may offer opportunities for testing innovative models that would be more difficult to implement in countries with more developed health systems.

"The HIV/AIDS pandemic has taught us the value of involving all elements of society, including affected communities and populations of all income levels," says Koplan, "Most importantly, we must realize the value of international public health partnerships."


'/>"/>
Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Harvard School of Public Health awarded $12 million grant to improve global maternal health
2. Largest global childhood pneumonia etiology study launched
3. New global health delivery curricula
4. 3 research programs win $6M in CIHR grants to promote global health equity
5. Joint winners announced in Research4life global case study competition
6. 350 million adults have diabetes: Study reveals the scale of global epidemic
7. Global Health Council opens 38th annual international conference in Washington
8. International AIDS Society urges world leaders at UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS to integrate a fourth pillar -- HIV cure research -- into the global response to the epidemic
9. GW researchers show host Mta1 gene is required for optimal survival of schistosome parasites, a leading global cause of cancer
10. New database to help track quality of medicines in global markets
11. MRSA eliminated by copper in live global broadcast
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/21/2017)... TX (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... Care products, announced an exciting new partnership with the highly regarded and well ... Airway Management’s highly innovative, myTAP & myTAP PAP Nasal Pillow Mask, and will ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... Malvern, Worcestershire, UK (PRWEB) , ... April 21, ... ... Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the category of International Trade, the UK’s most ... performance in international trade, which represents 95% of total revenues and has grown ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... Ramon, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... might not understand the estate planning process, or where to even begin. “Now more ... unresolved if you are to properly protect yourself and your family,” said attorney Lisa ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... , ... April 21, 2017 , ... Westside Dental ... personalized dental care since 1985. After thirty-two years, Dr. Latner has become one of ... help my numerous clients over the years with all their dental needs,” said Dr. ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... Each year, ... is a day to clean, plant trees and look forward to a better future. ... just about doing something outdoors. Indoor air quality can be two to five times ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... Calif. , April 19, 2017  IRIDEX Corporation ... will release financial results for the first quarter 2017 ... 2017.  The Company,s management team will host a corresponding ... p.m. ET. Investors interested in listening to ... 707-0665 for domestic callers or (703) 326-3030 for international ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... -- The Global Effective Microorganisms (EM) Market by ... covered and analysed the potential of Global Effective Microorganisms (EM) ... and growth factors. The report identifies and analyses the emerging ... global market. ... Tables and Figures, 6 Major Company Profiles, spread across 124 ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 19, 2017  Novartis today announced the publication ... Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National ... patients with treatment-naïve severe aplastic anemia (SAA) achieved ... eltrombopag at the initiation of and concurrently with ... three sequential treatment groups, or cohorts. Cohort 3 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: