Navigation Links
Gladstone scientists identify target that may reduce complications of obesity
Date:2/3/2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA February 2, 2010 -- Although obesity is a risk factor for diabetes and coronary heart disease worldwide, only some obese individuals go on to develop these metabolic complications, while others are relatively protected. Defining these protective factors could help scientists prevent disease in the wider population.

To this end, a research team at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, led by Suneil Koliwad, MD, PhD, recently added new details that link obesity to diabetes and heart disease.

When individuals become obese from overeating, cells called adipocytes located in the fat tissue fill up with dietary fats and begin to die. Immune cells called macrophages move out of the blood stream and into this tissue, where they accumulate around dying adipocytes. As the macrophages work to clear away the dead cells, they are exposed to large amounts of dietary fat that can result in unwanted consequences. Exposure to saturated fats, in particular, causes the macrophages to enter an inflammatory state. In this state, the macrophages secrete cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, that encourage the development of insulin resistance, diabetes, and heart disease.

The Gladstone team hypothesized that enhancing the capacity of macrophages to store dietary fats might alter this process. To do this, they focused on an enzyme called DGAT1, which makes triglycerides from dietary fats for storage as cellular energy reserves.

They examined a transgenic strain of mice (aP2-Dgat1) that make large amounts of DGAT1 in both adipocytes and macrophages. On a high-fat diet, these mice became obese, but the macrophages in their fat tissue did not undergo inflammatory activation, and the mice were protected from developing systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and fatty livers, all problems that were profound in the control mice.

Even more interesting was the team's finding that the protection against diet-induced inflammation and insulin resistance could be conferred on normal mice simply by replacing their macrophages with those from aP2-Dgat1 mice by bone marrow transplantation.

"We found in experimental mice that a single enzyme, DGAT1, in macrophages is involved in many of the problems associated with obesity," said Dr. Koliwad. "This is exciting because humans have this enzyme as well, providing the potential for a therapeutic target to examine."

Using cultured cells, the team also showed that increasing the amount of DGAT1 expressed by macrophages increased their capacity to store triglycerides and protected them against inflammatory activation by saturated fats. Moreover, DGAT1 expression was increased by treatment of macrophages with PPARgamma agonists, which are widely used agents to treat diabetes, and DGAT1 was required for these agents to protect macrophages against inflammatory activation induced by saturated fats.

"Our results are very exciting," said Dr. Robert Farese, senior author on the study. "We have used DGAT1 as a tool to uncover a mechanism by which macrophages might protect individuals from developing serious consequences of obesity."


'/>"/>

Contact: Valerie Tucker
vtucker@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2019
Gladstone Institutes
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Gladstone scientists identify single microRNA that controls blood vessel development
2. Gladstone scientists identify role of fatty acids in Alzheimers disease
3. HBO, Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, UC Davis Alzheimers Disease Center, UCSF Memory & Aging Center and The Alzheimers Association, No. Cal. Present an Advance Screening of THE ALZHEIMERS PROJECT: Momentum In Science
4. New prion protein discovered by Canadian scientists may offer insight into mad cow disease
5. Scientists Probe Sepsis Deadly Secrets
6. Scientists puzzled by severe allergic reaction to cancer drug in the middle Southern US
7. Scientists Develop Natural Protection for Stored Foods
8. Scientists detect presence of marburg virus in african fruit bats
9. Scientists Spot Brains Free Will Center
10. Scientists ID Likely Culprit in Popcorn Lung
11. Scientists explain how insulin secreting cells maintain their glucose sensitivity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2017 , ... This Saturday, ... & magic, plus a very special performance by Alabama Symphony Orchestra musicians Yifan Zhou, ... their specialties, such as dim sum, and exhibitors offer a look at Chinese games, ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Inspiration, Community & Mentorship – Top Students ... Fordham Institute’s High Stakes for High Achievers offer recommendations for how ... high-achieving students as a subgroup and reporting their results separately. Top students and ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Pass, OR (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2017 ... ... Gerald H. Pollack, Ph.D., http://www.faculty.washington.edu/ghp , Sharon Kleyne, the nation’s foremost ... of Water, Global Climate Change and Your Health on Voice America, once again ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2017 , ... ... than 30 lives in the last month. Yellow fever is primarily spread through contact ... the health community’s focus on how to prevent its spread. , According to multiple ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... ... to topics like finances, friendship, marriage, leadership, gossip, prostitution, adultery, anger, and common ... Publishing authors, Dr. Judith Coats and Dr. David Coats. In September of 1983, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/24/2017)... PUNE, India , January 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... Market Research, titled, "Cold Chain Logistics Market by Application ... Frozen Dessert, Meat, Fish & Sea Food, Drugs & ... Forecasts, 2014-2022," projects that the global cold chain logistics ... growing at a CAGR of 16% (2016 to 2022). ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... , Jan. 24, 2017 Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ... Public today recognized 40 finalists in the Regeneron Science ... and math competition for high school seniors. Finalists were ... of their research projects. The finalists will ... from March 9-15 to undergo a rigorous judging process ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... 24, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... Trends - Product, Material - Forecast to 2025" report to ... ... a CAGR of around 5.4% over the next decade to reach ... trends that the market is witnessing include 3D medical printing is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: