Navigation Links
Gift will allow Mayo researchers to explore cause of dementia in the elderly
Date:3/22/2011

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. To help continue its internationally recognized work in Lewy body dementia, the Harry T. Mangurian, Jr., Foundation has awarded Mayo Clinic a $1 million gift, pledged over four years. Lewy body dementia, which combines aspects of both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, is the second most common form of dementia in the United States.

    VIDEO ALERT: Additional audio and video resources, including excerpts from an interview with Drs. Dennis Dickson and Tanis Ferman, are available on the Mayo Clinic News Blog.

The funds will support studies designed to understand how Lewy body dementia develops, how to treat it more effectively, and how to diagnose it earlier.

"The generous donation by Mangurian Foundation will be used to advance our knowledge about one of the most common and least recognized disorders that causes dementia," says Dennis Dickson, M.D., a neuropathologist who is credited with being among the first to recognize the impact of Lewy body dementia in the elderly.

"This gift offers the exciting potential for improving the future care of patients with the disorder," says Dr. Dickson, who will oversee the projects the gift supports.

"We are pleased to provide this support to the Mayo Clinic, hoping that it not only enhances their research efforts into Lewy body and other dementias, but also inspires others to join in seeking effective treatments for this and similar diseases," says Stephen Mehallis, president of the Harry T. Mangurian, Jr., Foundation. "Our mission statement reflects our benefactor's wishes and determination to continue the fight against these diseases."

Harry T. Mangurian, Jr., was a businessman, an owner of the Boston Celtics basketball team, a Thoroughbred racehorse owner and breeder and a philanthropist.

Few medical centers have the experience with Lewy body dementia to perform studies in genetics, new drugs studies, and imaging, as Mayo Clinic proposes, Mehallis adds. Among their advances, Mayo researchers have identified features of the disease that helps physicians distinguish it, discovered distinct brain pathologies and located genes that cause or influence risk for Lewy body dementia, and have developed promising imaging techniques to aid in diagnosis.

The Mangurian Foundation gift will fund three projects that will involve scientists at Mayo Clinic campuses in Jacksonville, Fla., and in Rochester, Minn., according to Dr. Dickson.

The first study combines a clinical registry with genetics research, with the ultimate goal of identifying genes that cause or influence risk for Lewy body dementia. The second project will support laboratory research to refine a cellular model of the disorder and use it to test drug therapies. The third project, occurring in Rochester, is an imaging study that is designed to develop imaging techniques to help physicians diagnose Lewy body dementia and document its progression in patients.

Among the participating researchers are Tanis Ferman, Ph.D., in Jacksonville, and Bradley Boeve, M.D., in Rochester. They are developing methods to accurately diagnose Lewy body dementia in its earliest stages, using questionnaires and psychological tests.

Kejal Kantarci, M.D., in Rochester, will study Lewy body dementia patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a brain imaging technique, to "see" the differences between this form of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and to understand how these changes can be recognized early.

In his neuropathology laboratory, Dr. Dickson will evaluate the brains of Lewy body dementia patients with the goals of improving the diagnostic capabilities of MRI and understanding what happens in the brain that makes this form of dementia appear different from Alzheimer's.

The Foundation will also support Shu-Hui Yen, Ph.D., in Jacksonville, who has developed a way to form Lewy bodies in cultured nerve cells. She is using this system to discover drugs that may one day be useful in treating Lewy body dementia.

Collectively, these studies have the potential to help researchers learn more about Lewy body dementia to improve our ability to diagnose the disease earlier, identify new treatment possibilities and even create individualized medicine and prevention opportunities, Dr. Dickson says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-2299
Mayo Clinic
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Mouse nose nerve cells mature after birth, allowing bonding, recognition with mother
2. MIT scientists identify new H1N1 mutation that could allow virus to spread more easily
3. Medical oncology recognized at EU level to allow free movement of doctors
4. Salivary glands as organs of immunity: New research makes oral immunization easier to swallow
5. PET scans may allow early prediction of response to targeted therapy of thyroid cancer
6. Revealing the wiring that allows us to adapt to the unexpected
7. FDA Lowers Amount of Acetaminophen Allowed in Prescription Painkillers
8. New glaucoma test allows earlier, more accurate detection
9. Factors linked to speech/swallowing problems after treatment for head and neck cancers
10. Speech, Swallowing Usually OK After Head & Neck Cancer Therapy
11. Virtual biopsy may allow earlier diagnosis of brain disorder in athletes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (PRWEB) , ... April ... ... Josée Côté as Account Manager for the North East region. Côté has 20+ ... operations and consulting. Prior to Phytomer, Côté worked with an array of high-end ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Rob Lowe is a popular actor that has ... presence to an educational purpose as the host of the “Informed” series. The program ... a recent episode, the series focuses on thyroid cancer. , Although thyroid cancer is ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... , ... April 27, 2017 , ... ... Insights in Incentives, Rewards, and Recognition: A Nudge Guide," a groundbreaking analysis of ... field. Offering practical takeaways to apply immediately to IRR programs, the report highlights ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... Neb. (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2017 , ... ... was named the 2017 North American CAREGiverSM of the Year for her extraordinary ... selects one of its 60,000 North American professional caregivers for the prestigious award ...
(Date:4/27/2017)... GA (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2017 , ... Are ... a tragic spike in water-related accidents and drownings during the summer. While most of ... is that these situations occur every day. Very few people are taking the time ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017 Research and ... Market Size, Market Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, ... report to their offering. ... The global pharmacogenomics market was valued at US$ 7,167.6 Mn ... by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% from 2016 ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... LUND, Sweden , April 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... OTCQX: NEVPF) ("NeuroVive") today announced positive preclinical ... company,s preclinical compound for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), ... NV556 has previously ... STAM™ NASH model. Today, NeuroVive,s scientists present ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... April 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - CRH Medical Corporation (TSX: CRH) (NYSE MKT: CRHM) ... & Co. Healthcare Investor Conference 2017 at the Sheraton Hotel in ... , Chief Executive Officer of the Company is scheduled to present ... Richard Bear and the Chairman of the Board, Tony ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: