Navigation Links
Genetics May Be Tied to Breast Cancer Risk in Unexpected Ways

TUESDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing may help identify women at risk for certain types of breast cancer, according to a new study.

Researchers found that over-expression or under-expression of certain genes may help doctors pinpoint women with estrogen receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. Doctor could then take appropriate steps to reduce breast cancer risk in certain patients.

The study appears March 19 in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

"Currently, three drugs can be used to prevent breast cancer in women who are at extremely high risk for the disease," study co-author Dr. Seema Khan, said in a journal release. "However, these drugs prevent only breast cancers that are sensitive to hormones, commonly referred to as estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. They do not prevent breast cancers that are insensitive to hormones, or estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers."

"We should not expose women at risk for hormone-insensitive breast cancer to the side effects of preventive medications that we know will not work for them," added Khan, who is co-leader of the Breast Cancer Program at Northwestern University, in Chicago. "Moreover, if we knew who these women were, we could focus on them in terms of designing new studies to find a solution for preventing hormone-insensitive cancer."

In their study, the researchers collected samples from unaffected breasts of 27 women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, 27 women with estrogen receptor-negative cancer and 12 women without the disease.

The samples from the women with estrogen receptor-negative cancer had significantly higher expression of 13 genes, eight of which are associated with fat metabolism.

"This was interesting because obesity is a breast cancer risk factor for postmenopausal women, but obese women are generally thought to be at increased risk for hormone-sensitive cancer," Khan said. "We were surprised to see that some of these genes that are associated with lipid metabolism, or the metabolism of fats, are actually more highly expressed in the unaffected breasts of women with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer."

The researchers also found that two genes associated with fat metabolism were under-expressed in samples from women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

"It will be a few more steps before this information is practically useful, but we are hoping that it can take us to a place where we can obtain a breast sample from healthy women, see that they are at risk for a certain type of breast cancer and tailor the prevention strategy accordingly," Khan said.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about breast cancer.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Cancer Prevention Research, news release, March 19, 2013

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Molecular coordination in evolution: A review in Nature Reviews Genetics
2. Childhood Allergies May Be Affected by Race, Genetics
3. A smoking gun in lung cancer epigenetics
4. Renowned medical genetics pioneer to join LA BioMed faculty
5. Genetics Society of Americas Genetics journal highlights for February 2013
6. Studies assess genetics, modified treatment to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity
7. Genetics Society of Americas Genetics journal highlights for December 2012
8. Optogenetics illuminates pathways of motivation through brain, Stanford study shows
9. Genetics point to serious pregnancy complication
10. Worlds largest respiratory genetics study launches on World COPD Day
11. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine: New open access journal launched by Wiley
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Genetics May Be Tied to Breast Cancer Risk in Unexpected Ways
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... 13, 2015 , ... PhyMed Healthcare Group , a ... partnership with WPC Healthcare , a provider of predictive analytics solutions for ... into an aggregated data repository necessary to perform reporting and analytics on selected ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... solutions, announced today their sponsorship of the Microsoft Dynamics AXUG, GPUG and NAVUG ... Summit, GPUG Summit and NAVUG Summit are independent user conferences designed and led ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... Radnor, Pennsylvania (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 ... ... and people through a unique private messaging application, announced today a significant contract ... for another five years. Independence plans to build on the growing success of ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... A child without a healthy ... SmileCareClub , the leading remote invisible aligner system, has joined with Global Dental ... without it. For each aligner treatment plan purchased, SmileCareClub will donate one clinic visit ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... a first-of-its kind product that targets the unique health needs of new ... the American Pregnancy Association ( ), utilizes Nordic Naturals’ exclusive, new, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... YORK , Oct. 13, 2015 Pomerantz ... filed against Amicus Therapeutics, Inc. ("Amicus" or the "Company")(NASDAQ: ... filed in United States District Court, District of ... a class consisting of all persons or entities who ... 1, 2015 inclusive (the "Class Period"). This class action seeks ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , Oct. 13, 2015  Vitamin Angels – ... and mothers in need of nutritional support - announced ... by the United Nations (UN). The UN,s newly established ... – are a recent follow up to the Millennium ... deadline for completion. The new 17 Global Goals intend ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... , Oct. 13, 2015   Generational Equity ... middle-market businesses, is pleased to announce the acquisition of ... in Largo, Florida , by Meridian ... on September 11, 2015. Florida ... --> Florida . To learn ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: