Navigation Links
Genetic variant associated with aggressive form of prostate cancer
Date:1/11/2010

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues have identified the first genetic variant associated with aggressive prostate cancer, proving the concept that genetic information may one day be used in combination with other factors to guide treatment decisions.

The research will be reported online next week (Jan. 11-15) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This finding addresses one of the most important clinical questions of prostate cancer the ability at an early stage to distinguish between aggressive and slow-growing disease," said Jianfeng Xu, M.D., Dr. P.H., professor of epidemiology and cancer biology. "Although the genetic marker currently has limited clinical utility, we believe it has the potential to one day be used in combination with other clinical variables and genetic markers to predict which men have aggressive prostate cancer at a stage when the disease is still curable."

According to the authors, prostate cancer accounts for one-fourth of all cancer diagnoses in the United States. Autopsy studies suggest that most aging men will develop prostate lesions that, if detected clinically, would be diagnosed as cancer.

Although most men have a slow-growing form of the disease, aggressive prostate cancers are currently the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., accounting for 27,000 deaths annually.

"The current inability to accurately distinguish risk for life-threatening, aggressive prostate cancer from the overwhelming majority of slow-growing cases creates a treatment dilemma," said Xu.

While researchers, including Xu's team, have identified multiple genetic variants associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer in the first place, until now there have been no genetic factors associated with disease aggressiveness.

Based on existing evidence that some men are genetically predisposed to developing aggressive prostate cancer, the researchers hypothesized that inherited genetic variants exist that could be used as markers to identify these men at an early, curable stage of disease.

"Identifying factors that are associated with a risk of having or developing aggressive disease is urgently needed to reduce over-diagnosis and over-treatment of this common cancer," said Karim Kader, M.D., Ph.D., a Wake Forest Baptist urologist specializing in prostate cancer and a co-author on the paper.

The study involved the analysis of genetic information from 4,849 men with aggressive disease and 12,205 with slow-growing disease to determine if the men with aggressive disease had genetic variants in common. The analysis included participants in the Genetic Markers of Susceptibility study performed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as well as additional study populations in the U.S. and Sweden.

The researchers identified a genetic variant (rs4054823) that was associated with a 25 percent higher risk of developing aggressive disease.

"A single variant with a moderate effect such as this is unlikely to be sufficient on its own at predicting risk," said Xu. "But its identification is significant because it indicates that variants predisposing men to aggressive disease exist in the genome."

He said that as more variants associated with aggressive disease are identified, it is possible that doctors could test men to determine their risk of aggressive disease not only at the time of diagnosis, but early enough in their lives to target them for increased screening.

"We speculate that a panel of variants could be an important part of developing a screening strategy that could reduce the number of men requiring screening, thereby reducing over-diagnosis, while also identifying men at risk for developing aggressive disease at a stage when the disease is potentially curable."


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4453
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Many Parents Share Genetic Test Findings With Kids
2. Genetic predisposition increases childhood asthma risk
3. New Alzheimers findings: High stress and genetic risk factor lead to increased memory decline
4. Test Spots Genetic Damage Done by Smoking
5. Scientists demonstate link between genetic variant and effectiveness of smoking cessation meds
6. Scientists highlight benefits of genetic research in sport, but warn of ethical concerns
7. Genetics Hold Promise, Challenges for Cancer Care
8. Researchers genetically engineer micro-organisms into tiny factories
9. Study Questions Genetic Screening for Treatable Diseases
10. Researchers provide genetic associations from a genome-wide scan for cardiovascular disease traits
11. Genetic variation affects smoking cessation treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... September 22, 2017 , ... Tiny Transitions ( tinytransitions.com ), ... in-home and online newborn sleep consultations . , “We are seeing now, ... company owner Courtney Zentz, a pediatric sleep professional, post-partum doula and certified lactation ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 22, 2017 , ... ... book on the fallacy of an obligatory tithe, and the freedom experienced when ... is the creation of published author, Lysa M. Harrison. , Published by Christian ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... , ... September 22, 2017 , ... ... you brush more effectively even on the go. Their electric toothbrushes aggressively attack ... gum inflammation, with UV sanitizing technology. Combining leading edge Enke technology with a ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... 22, 2017 , ... Egg freezing and embryo freezing are ... a slight statistical advantage for live births, frozen eggs offer many advantages, depending ... undergoing medical treatment or who are concerned about the decline of their fertility ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Process Capability Indices for Medical ... p.m. ET, http://www.fdanews.com/processcapabilityindices      , Quality in device manufacturing ... The Quality System Regulation (§820.250), and Devicemakers find themselves staring at a warning ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/6/2017)... ANTONIO , Sept. 6, 2017  Robert G. ... a Pinnacle Professional Member in recognition of his contributions ... Szewc serves as a Nephrologist at the practice of ... emergency medicine, kidney care and hypertension solutions. He has ... 20 years of career experience, as well as expertise ...
(Date:9/6/2017)... Sept. 6, 2017 Eli Lilly and Company ... present new data for galcanezumab and lasmiditan, two investigational ... International Headache Society (IHC) taking place Sept. 7-10 in ... will highlight new, long-term data from an open-label study ... galcanezumab (120 mg and 240 mg) for the prevention ...
(Date:9/5/2017)... LONDON , Sept. 5, 2017  Just 18 ... Valid Insight is pleased to announce the appointment of ... Tammy Wynne , Dominic Jones-Phillips and ... from industry. ... a team of market access writers. She has over ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: