Navigation Links
Genetic sequencing could help match patients with biomarker-driven cancer trials, treatments
Date:11/30/2011

ANN ARBOR, Mich. As cancer researchers continue to identify genetic mutations driving different cancer subtypes, they are also creating a catalog of possible targets for new treatments.

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Michigan Center for Translational Pathology (MCTP) recently completed a pilot study aimed at solving the practical challenges involved in quickly and systematically sequencing genetic material from patients with advanced or treatment-resistant cancer in order to match them with existing clinical trials based on the biomarkers identified.

"We're talking about more than just examining a few genes where mutations are known to occur, or even about a hundred genes," says co-lead investigator Dan Robinson, Ph.D., a post-doctoral fellow at MCTP. "We're talking about the ability to sequence more than 20,000 genes and look not just for individual genetic mutations, but at combinations of mutations."

The exploratory study, known as the Michigan Oncology Sequencing Project (MI-ONCOSEQ), found that identifying a patient's "mutational landscape" provides a promising approach for identifying which trials may best help a patient, the researchers say. Their findings were published today in Science Translational Medicine.

"High-throughput sequencing harnesses the latest technological advances to process millions of pieces of genetic information, allowing us to map a cancer's genetic aberrations," says co-lead investigator Sameek Roychowdhury, M.D., Ph.D., a clinical lecturer in hematology and oncology at the U-M Medical School. "Using this technique to identify biomarker-driven treatment options really opens the door for personalized oncology, but it also presents a number of logistical challenges, chief among them making the results available cost-effectively and in a clinically relevant timeframe."

"A decade or two ago, this type of sequencing would have cost many millions or even billions of dollars, but the technology is advancing so rapidly, we're now talking in terms of thousands which makes widespread use a real possibility," he adds.

Cancer can arise from a variety of genetic alterations including rearrangements, additions, deletions and substitutions within the genetic code.

"Different sequencing processes are required to find different types of alterations," Roychowdhury says. "But to be cost-effective, there must be a balancing act between a broad analysis and a deep analysis."

The study began by testing the researchers' sequencing strategy on prostate cancer tumors that had been grown in mice. Later, two patients were enrolled in a clinical pilot: one with colorectal cancer and one with melanoma. Potential clinical trials were identified for both patients.

However, the researchers caution, not all patients will match an existing study. Some patients with a given mutation may be excluded because they have, for example, prostate cancer, but a trial is only enrolling breast cancer patients. The researchers believe that this approach also provides an opportunity to approach clinical trials in a new way, moving from a tissue-specific focus toward genetic aberrations shared across cancer types.

Still, enrolling in a trial does not guarantee a patient will benefit from the treatment, the researchers caution.

Hurdles to widespread implementation include the need for a multidisciplinary Sequencing Tumor Board to interpret the complex sequencing results, management of the necessary computational resources, and a process for dealing with incidental genetic findings revealed by the sequencing such as a risk for hemochromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes the body to absorb too much iron.

Achieving a four-week turnaround time for results is important because that's how long patients are usually required to wait for unsuccessful treatments to leave their systems before starting a clinical trial.

"Once some of the practical and technological hurdles are cleared, we envision an array of mutation and pathway-based trials for available targeted therapies, with eligibility based on molecular assessment," says senior investigator Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., director of MCTP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and S.P. Hicks Professor of Pathology at the U-M Medical School. "Moreover, if patients are treated with matching targeted therapies and develop secondary resistance, it could also help reveal the mechanisms of resistance and inform future trials for combination therapies."

Chinnaiyan says the work was made possible only by collaboration and teamwork. U-M physicians Moshe Talpaz, M.D., Stephen Gruber, M.D., Ph.D., and Kenneth Pienta, M.D. played key roles in the clinical implementation of this exploratory protocol, he notes.

Researchers hope this type of sequencing will become more widely available over the next 5 to 10 years. Cancer patients are encouraged to speak to their doctors about clinical trial opportunities.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ian Demsky
idemsky@umich.edu
735-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Certain genetic profiles associated with recurrence-free survival for non-small cell lung cancer
2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Kids May Have Genetic Cause
3. Epigenetic signals differ across alleles
4. Study reveals genetic link between mammographic density and breast cancer
5. Genetic Risk Score Doesnt Spot Heart Trouble in Women
6. Penn researchers find genetic link to leukemias with an unknown origin
7. Scientists Spot Genetic Fingerprints of Individual Cancers
8. Genetic health risks in children of assisted reproductive technology
9. Genetic Mutation Linked to Prostate Cancer in Blacks
10. Protecting the brain from of a deadly genetic disease
11. Protecting the brain from a deadly genetic disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... ... years, Doctors on Liens has published a directory of the top doctors working ... When the company started in 1997, the directory was a single page focusing on chiropractors ... directory features a vast array of medical specialists stretching from Sacramento to San ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... , ... Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) Portland today announced plans ... (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. The group, which is being launched with the help ... opportunity to share stories and advice, seek help, and continue their education on how ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... interview of two ostomy patients, standing as living proof that attitude and determination ... digestive diseases and issues that spike around the holidays. This campaign will offer ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... version of its SaaS LIMS, CloudLIMS Lite. CloudLIMS Lite helps biobanks, clinical, research ... labeling, storing, shipping and disposal. The new version is a faster and a ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Rijuven Corp launches rejiva ( http://www.rejiva.com ), a unique wearable ... wearable health technology on the market can deliver all that rejiva can. , “Rejiva ... about their health than the usual heart rate and steps taken”, adds Evens Augustin, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... On Thursday, December 1st 2016, ... research, development and innovation in the biopharmaceutical industry at ... in the presence of Sergey Tsyb, Vice Minister of ... , Natalia Sanina, First Vice Chairman of the ... of Roszdravnadzor, National Service of Control in Healthcare, Sergey ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , December 2, 2016 bioLytical Laboratories, ein ... HIV-Selbsttest, bei den Mitgliedern des Apothekenbundes von Kenia eingeführt. ... ... INSTI HIV Self Test! (PRNewsFoto/bioLytical Laboratories) ...      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161201/444905 ) ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2016 Lianluo Smart Limited (Nasdaq: ... which develops, markets and sells medical devices and ... and international markets, recently attended the ... New Progress Forum, co-hosted by the Institute of ... , Guangdong Provincial People,s Hospital and Cardiology Department ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: