Navigation Links
Genetic factor controls health-harming inflammation in obese
Date:6/13/2011

CLEVELAND June 13, 2011 Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered a genetic factor that can regulate obesity-induced inflammation that contributes to chronic health problems.

If they learn to control levels of the factor in defense cells called macrophages, "We have a shot at a novel treatment for obesity and its complications, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer," said Mukesh K. Jain, MD, Ellery Sedgwick Jr. Chair, director of the Case Cardiovascular Research Institute, professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and chief research officer of the Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and senior author of the new study.

A description of the research, led by Drs. Xudong Liao and Nikunj Sharma, research associates at the School of Medicine, will be published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Monday, June 13.

Signals from the environment within tissues determine whether Kruppel-like factor 4, KLF4 for short, is turned off or on, which in turn determines whether macrophages become attackers or healers.

In the absence of KLF4, macrophages produce and spew toxins the stuff of inflammation - that destroy invaders such as bacteria.

High levels of KLF4 turn macrophages into anti-inflammatory cells that remove the debris and secrete compounds that heal tissues.

The process works well in lean people. Fellow researchers in France found that the macrophages residing in fatty tissues of lean people contain high levels of KLF4.

But, when people eat high-fat foods and gain weight, their body fat draws more and more macrophages, the vast majority of which are of the inflammatory type. These macrophages contain low levels of KLF4 and are more easily irritated by cytokines, which are cell-signaling proteins, and fatty acids released by fat cells. The macrophages respond by producing a low level of inflammation, Jain explained.

"A low level of inflammation over time is deleterious," he said. In people, long-lasting inflammation is connected to diabetes, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and other chronic illnesses.

In experiments using mouse models, Jain's team found that when KLF4 was removed from macrophages, they all assumed the inflammatory state.

Furthermore, when the KLF4-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks, they gained 15 percent more weight than control animals fed the same diet, and developed severe diabetes as evidenced by glucose tolerance tests.

The researchers are now designing experiments to determine if they can prevent or reverse the shift from anti-inflammatory to inflammatory by increasing KLF4 levels in macrophages as they are bombarded by cytokines or fats.

If they can induce macrophages to remain anti-inflammatory, Jain said, "Would you be able to lose weight, would diabetes go away, would inflammation go away?

"Possibly."


'/>"/>

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New genetic technique converts skin cells into brain cells
2. UT Southwestern research uncovers genetic link between emphysema, lung cancer
3. Scale helps to measure the utility of genetic counseling in tackling fear of cancer
4. Study identifies genetic mutations associated with cancer risk for hereditary cancer syndrome
5. Researchers characterize epigenetic fingerprint of 1,628 people
6. UCI researchers find link between environment and genetics in triggering MS
7. New advances in lipid genetics lead to better detection and prevention of major diseases
8. Researchers home in on genetic signature of esophageal cancer
9. Study gives clue as to how notes are played on the genetic piano
10. Scientists use genetically altered virus to get tumors to tattle on themselves
11. Evolutionary geneticist to give talk at UC Riverside on how biological species evolve and adapt
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/4/2016)... ... 03, 2016 , ... Penrose Senior Care Auditors® was announced ... evening at the 26th Annual SMU Cox Dallas 100™ Awards Ceremony and Banquet ... for Entrepreneurship. Dallas 100™, co-founded by the Caruth Institute, honors the ingenuity, commitment ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... , ... December 04, 2016 , ... ... major cosmetic surgery can now take advantage of a cosmetic procedure known as ... rejuvenation treatment that reduces the appearance of age spots, fine lines, uneven ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... PITTSBURGH, PA (PRWEB) , ... December 04, 2016 , ... ... not enough. One must brush properly to achieve optimal results. This important necessity inspired ... saw a need for a way to ensure that people break or avoid bad ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... ... Lori G. Cohen and Sara K. Thompson , shareholders in ... Conference Institute’s 21st Drug & Medical Device Litigation Conference , taking place in New ... Cohen, who chairs the firm’s Pharmaceutical, Medical Device & Health Care Litigation Practice and ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... DIEGO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... Event at the Hard Rock Hotel San Diego honoring the 2016 MPN Heroes—eight individuals ... myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) by going above and beyond the standard of care, demonstrating leadership ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... Health and Gateway Health proudly announce a dynamic collaboration that ... plan members with specific high risk needs. In ... group of consumers, Wellbridge combines technology and population expertise with ... members, daily behaviors and lifestyle. ... , , ...
(Date:12/5/2016)...  New research by the CVS Health (NYSE: ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office ... (ASPR), published online today in JAMA Internal ... patients with chronic conditions to refill medications prior ... affirms that public-private partnerships can facilitate timely pharmacy ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... 5, 2016  BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (NYSE: ... company, will demonstrate an enhanced technology platform designed with ... the company,s leading Pyxis™ and Alaris™ systems, at this ... Midyear Meeting being held in Las ... national data show that approximately 68 percent of medication ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: