Navigation Links
Genes carried by E. coli bacteria linked to colon cancer
Date:8/16/2012

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have identified a type of E. coli bacteria that may encourage the development of colon cancer.

The Liverpool team had previously shown that people with colon cancer and with the inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, have high numbers of a sticky type of E. coli in their colons.

The team have now found that E. coli bacteria, which carry pks genes that encode a toxin that damages DNA in the cells of the gut lining, are more commonly found in the colons of patients that have inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer than those that do not have these conditions. Approximately two thirds of patients with colon cancer carry these E. coli compared with one in five with a healthy colon.

Research, in collaboration with the University of North Carolina, showed that mice with colitis are more likely to carry these E. coli and they often develop colon cancer when carrying E. coli containing pks genes. They did not, however, develop cancer with identical E. coli that did not contain pks. They also found that the presence of E. coli carrying the pks genes did not appear to increase inflammation of the gut.

Professor Jonathan Rhodes, from the University's Institute of Translational Medicine, said: "The fact that the pks-positive E. coli seemed to promote colon cancer in mice without causing increased inflammation led us to investigate its possible role in human colon cancer. The marked increase in the presence of these bacteria in the colon, not only in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but also in patients with colon cancer who do not have inflammatory bowel disease, suggests that damage caused to DNA, as a result of the toxin that the pks genes produce, may promote the development of colon cancer."

Dr Barry Campbell, co-author of the research at the University of Liverpool, said: "The research suggests that E. Coli has a much wider involvement in the development of colon cancer than previously thought. It is important to build on these findings to understand why this type of bacteria, containing the pks genes, is present in some people and not others."

The Liverpool team involved in this study were also the researchers that discovered that dietary agents, particularly plantain and broccoli, could prevent the uptake and transport of E. coli through cells in the gut. They also found that fat emulsifiers in processed food encouraged the movement of bacteria through the cells.


'/>"/>

Contact: Samantha Martin
samantha.martin@liv.ac.uk
44-015-179-42248
University of Liverpool
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers ID Genes That May Determine Mental Illness
2. 2 repressor genes identified as essential for placental development
3. Genes Associated With Autism Also Related to Schizophrenia
4. Genes Might Cause Some to Shun Pork
5. Blond Genes May Vary Around the World
6. Mystery of the missing breast cancer genes
7. Living longer - variability in infection-fighting genes can be a boon for male survival
8. Genes Might Be Key to Parkinsons Spread
9. Strategy discovered to activate genes that suppress tumors and inhibit cancer
10. Study Ties Genes to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Prostate Cancer Risk
11. Obesity genes may influence food choices, eating patterns
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... Christmas:” a beautiful and enchanting tale that teaches children the true meaning of Christmas. “Journey ... Oklahoma City, and a devoted woman of faith. , “Becoming a parent changes you. ... of my mind for years, but actually doing it might have been a while in ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... ... the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced over 359,000 clinicians are ... who participate in APMs are paid for the quality of care they give to ... a system that delivers better care and one in which clinicians work together to ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... With the cold weather here, many people will have to clear snow with ... large amounts of snow, but they can be dangerous when used incorrectly. That’s why ... for the proper use of snow blowers:, , When removing wet ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... solutions, has recently unveiled impressive transportable capabilities with their iMedHD2™ Portable Teleultrasound ... an extension to RMT technology that delivers HD, dynamic, streaming ultrasound images and ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... certified dermatologist by the American Board of Dermatology and fellowship trained Mohs and ... the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Li completed his internship in internal medicine ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/20/2017)... 20, 2017 Avillion LLP, a co-developer and ... Mark Weinberg , MD MBA as Chief Medical Officer. Dr Weinberg ... USA . ... Dr Weinberg has spent more than 17 years as a pharmaceutical ... to micro-cap biotech. Over the course of his career, he has ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... -- Report Details What can be expected ... to grow at the fastest rates? This visiongain report ... opportunities and prospects. Our 190-page report provides 124 ... in the industry and the future market prospects. Our ... all the major categories of the ophthalmic devices market. ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... -- Conference Call and Webcast to Follow Vanda Pharmaceuticals ... release results for the fourth quarter of 2016 on Wednesday, February ... ... 4:30 PM ET on Wednesday, February 15, 2017, during which management ... and other corporate activities. To participate in the conference call, please ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: