Navigation Links
Genes Play Part in Prostate Cancer Among Races
Date:5/15/2008

Whites at higher risk than Hispanics, but genetics determines who gets it

THURSDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic differences may explain why white men have a higher prostate cancer risk than Hispanic men, information which may help doctors identify men who are more likely to develop the disease, U.S. researchers say.

They collected blood samples from 932 white men and 414 Hispanic men from south Texas and looked for mutations from the nuclear vitamin D receptor (CDX2 and FokI), which modulates the actions of vitamin D, and from 5-reductase type II (V89L & A49T), which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, a more potent form of the male hormone.

Among non-Hispanic white men with V89L, FokI was associated with a more than a 50 percent increased risk of prostate cancer. This effect was not seen in Hispanic men. Among Hispanic white men, a combination of CDX2 and V89L was associated with a more than threefold increased risk of prostate cancer. This link was not seen in white men.

The findings, published in the May 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, provide new information about genetic risks and racial differences, but need to be confirmed in larger studies.

"Prostate cancer is not likely caused by a few genes, but by multiple genes from different pathways. This study illustrates the importance of examining multiple genes to understand genetic risks for prostate cancer and differences seen by ethnicity," study author Kathleen Torkko, an instructor in the department of pathology at the University of Colorado, Denver, said in a prepared statement.

"Going forward, we need not only a better understanding of genetics but a better understanding of race and ethnicity. Studying disease by race is a complex issue, and the public needs to understand that we are trying to raise biological, rather than social, questions," Torkko said.

She said the goal of this research is to find ways to improve management and treatment of prostate cancer. Currently, the most common method for assessing prostate cancer risk is the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. But the test can identify tumors that may not be a threat, while missing other tumors.

"Men typically have this test after they turn 50 years old, and it can spot a tumor that may not cause a problem in a man's lifetime if left untreated. It could be more likely that a man will die from heart disease or some other ailment before his prostate cancer would kill him," Torkko said.

"At this point, it is not possible to accurately tell which tumors will be the more aggressive ones with our current screening tests. This means that we may be screening and treating some men unnecessarily," she noted.

More information

The National Cancer Institute has more about prostate cancer screening.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, May 15, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Connecting cancer genes
2. Cardiogenesis Reports First Quarter 2008 Results
3. Effect of mutant p53 stability on tumorigenesis and drug design
4. Hoffa, Cherry to Speak at Community Rally Supporting Genesys Nurses
5. Bread mold may hold secret to eliminating disease-causing genes
6. Unraveling the Link Between Genes and Environment
7. Cardiogenesis Corporation to Report 2008 First Quarter Results on May 15th
8. Genes Linked to Osteoporosis Identified
9. Environment key early: Genes role expands in alcohol dependence
10. A stem cell type supposed to be crucial for angiogenesis and cancer growth does not exist?
11. Breast cancer risk amplified by additional genes in combo with BRCA mutation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/22/2017)... NASHVILLE, Tenn. (PRWEB) , ... August 22, 2017 ... ... Company, is pleased to announce the addition of Zack Tisch as the ... services for the KLAS-ranked healthcare IT consulting firm’s national accounts, from assisting clients ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “To Walk Away”: ... a B17 bomber named Edward Koontz. “To Walk Away” is the creation of published ... has published over two hundred manuscripts in chemistry and religion, as well as four ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... John Stewart ... and Managing Member for t4 Leadership Development & Consulting. He has spent his ... of “success”: physician leadership development, servant leadership, data driven process improvement, and supportive ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... without risk to health and safety. By learning and implementing best practices for ... , In this webinar, attendees will gain a better understanding of a method ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Five chefs from local senior assisted living homes will serve ... Guests will be able to vote for their favorite Chef among the following: , ... Salad, Feta Cheese Sauce & Garlic Pita Crisp, Greek Mountain Ice Tea , ITALY, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/10/2017)... LAKEWOOD, Colo. , Aug. 10, 2017  Physical Rehabilitation ... Therapy, located in Lakewood, Colorado . The ... Jeff Lipkin , PT, DPT with his staff of ... the University of Pittsburgh and brings over 10 years of ... Belmar PT marks the 10th PRN clinic ...
(Date:8/8/2017)...   Second-quarter 2017 ... loss per share from continuing operations ... 16 percent to $110 million ... to $161 million Second-quarter ... operations increased 8 percent to $0.93 ...
(Date:8/7/2017)... Ind. , Aug. 7, 2017 Zimmer Biomet ... musculoskeletal healthcare, today announced that its Board of Directors has ... for the third quarter of 2017. ... be paid on or about October 27, 2017 to stockholders ... 22, 2017.  Future declarations of dividends are subject to approval ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: