Navigation Links
Gauging Brain Cancer Survival Time May Get Easier: Study
Date:4/10/2013

WEDNESDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy of people with aggressive brain cancer may be easier to determine with a new method under development at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, researchers say.

The UAB researchers found that patients with an overactive version of a specific enzyme live less than half as long as those with a less active version. This overactive enzyme can help predict how resistant the brain cancer will be to chemotherapy, and also help doctors arrive at treatment recommendations, the researchers said.

In conducting the study, published April 10 in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers examined tumors from 84 patients with a form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This deadly and aggressive cancer quickly becomes resistant to available treatments. With a combination of surgery, radiation and the chemotherapy drug temozolomide, patients with this form of brain cancer typically survive an average of 12 to 15 months.

The study revealed, however, that 25 percent to 30 percent of the patients whose tumor cells had an overactive version of an enzyme known as cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) live less than half as long as patients with a less active version.

"Our study reports for the first time the role of [CcO] as a prognostic marker in GBM patients' tumor tissues," study leader Corinne Griguer, an associate professor of neurosurgery in the UAB School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "High CcO activity comes with a 25-fold increase in risk of death."

The researchers said patients with the overactive enzyme lived for an average of six months. Those with a less active version lived for 14 months. Examination of a second group of glioblastoma multiforme patients from Europe confirmed their findings, the researchers said.

They concluded that tumor cells with increased CcO activity generate more energy and are more resistant to chemotherapy. The overactive enzyme also interferes with a protein, called cytochrome c, that triggers the self-destruction of cells infected or damaged by diseases such as cancer. When this happens, cancer cells can survive an abnormally long time.

But the researchers aren't stopping with this finding. "Giving some GBM patients bad news about their prognoses without also giving them better treatment options doesn't seem right to me," said Griguer, noting that the team is experimenting with another enzyme to try to predict patients' survival benefit from the chemo drug temozolomide.

"Our ultimate goal is to use the same mechanism that predicts shorter survival in some to design drugs that target cells not killed right away by chemotherapy," she said.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health provides more information on brain cancer.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of Alabama at Birmingham, news release, April 10, 2013


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Gauging seizures severity
2. For First Time, Pain Signature Spotted on Brain MRIs
3. Brain Surgery Eases Compulsive Eating in 10-Year-Old Girl
4. A New Peer-Reviewed Study Using CogniFit Brain Training Provides A Breakthrough In The Treatment Of Insomnia
5. RI Hospital: Traumatic brain injury worsens outcomes for those with nonepileptic seizures
6. Extracellular vesicles may open new opportunities for brain cancer diagnosis and treatment
7. Non-invasive mapping helps to localize language centers before brain surgery
8. Scans May Reveal Pre-Schizophrenia Brain Changes
9. Sexuality, traumatic brain injury, and rehabilitation
10. New minimally invasive, MRI-guided laser treatment for brain tumor found to be promising in study
11. Voices Against Brain Cancer Responds to Research Identifying Contributing Factor in Brain Tumors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Gauging Brain Cancer Survival Time May Get Easier: Study
(Date:2/22/2017)... , ... February 22, 2017 , ... Gevir, a New ... antler velvet, announced its products are coming soon to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online ... Thomson as a means to develop an effective natural treatment for Shelley’s Multiple Sclerosis, ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... treatment to the thousands of individuals who have recently fallen victim to America’s opioid ... in Orange County, California, where they are free from the shame, stigma, and ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... The National Academy of Certified ... the April 2017 testing period. NACCM, a nonprofit organization, has provided the premier ... exam is periodically re-calibrated to ensure that newly certified professionals are prepared to ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Giving patients with diabetes customized ... room, fewer hospital admissions, and better blood pressure and glycemic control, a ... study can be found here . , The study comes as health ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... In a 2012 survey, over ... not filling a prescription because they could not afford to pay for it. ... were 30-60%*. At the same time, hospitals, pharmacies, manufacturers and nursing ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... LG Innotek today announced that the company has developed the world,s ... is 1.5 times higher than the competitor,s 45mW module. ... of 200 -- 280nm, allowing it to be used for sterilization purpose. ... Innotek,s product emits UV in the range of 280nm. ... Until now, UV-C LED has ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... Mass. , Feb. 23, 2017   ... partner to global in vitro diagnostics manufacturers and ... series titled "Catalyzing Implementation of NGS-Based Tests" to ... March 30, 2017 at 11am Eastern Standard Time ... is to highlight the need for improved performance ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017  Spheryx, ... one poster presentation at PittCon 2017 Conference ... Pittcon is the world,s largest annual premier ... serves a wide array of industry, academic ... discovery and QA, food safety, environmental, bioterrorism ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: