Navigation Links
Game changer for arthritis and anti-fibrosis drugs
Date:11/11/2012

(SALT LAKE CITY)In a discovery that can fundamentally change how drugs for arthritis, and potentially many other diseases, are made, University of Utah medical researchers have identified a way to treat inflammation while potentially minimizing a serious side effect of current medications: the increased risk for infection.

These findings provide a new roadmap for making powerful anti-inflammatory medicines that will be safer not only for arthritis patients but also for millions of others with inflammation-associated diseases, such as diabetes, traumatic brain injury, and inflammatory bowel disease, according to cardiologist Dean Y. Li, M.D., Ph.D., the U School of Medicine vice dean for research and HA and Edna Benning endowed professor of medicine who led the study. "This can change the way medication is made," he says. "If we can find a way to replace our most powerful drugs for arthritis, we might be able to develop another way to treat inflammation in other diseases that we've been unable to touch because of the danger of suppressing people's immune systems."

The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and published Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, Nature online, provides the University the opportunity to explore commercializing the technology either through collaboration outside of the state with pharmaceutical companies or within the state via initiatives such as USTAR. The Utah Legislature established USTAR (Utah Science Technology and Research) initiative in 2006 to promote economic growth and high paying jobs through research at the U of U and Utah State University.

"This is just one example of many scientific opportunities for the University and USTAR to work together to benefit not only millions of patients but build medical innovations in Utah," says Li, who's also director of the U of U Molecular Medicine program.

Two Cellular Pathways

When the body undergoes trauma or gets an infection, it responds by releasing cytokinesproteins that enter cells and unleash a three-pronged attack to kill invading bugs, hype up the immune system, and cause inflammation. While inflammation fights infection, it also produces an undesired side effect by weakening blood vessels, which can lead to swelling in the joints, brain or other areas. Scientists long have believed that cytokines use one cellular pathway in their response to infection, meaning that drugs made to block cytokines from causing inflammation also block the immune system and the ability to kill invading bugs.

In a study with mice, Li and his research colleagues upended the one-pathway belief by showing that cytokines use not one but two cellular pathways to battle infection: one to turn on the immune system and kill intruders and a separate one that destroys the architecture of tissues and organs. Identifying the separate pathway for inflammation has vast potential for developing drugs. "We can selectively block inflammation without making the patient immunosuppressed," Li says. "This rewrites the strategy for today's medicines. We focused the work on arthritis given this is a proven market for drugs that reduce damage from inflammation and fibrosis, but we suspect that many other diseases ranging from fibrosis following heart attacks to inflammatory bowel disease may benefit from such an approach."

Li's discovery has dramatic implications for the field of rheumatology, according to Tracy M. Frech, M.D., U of U assistant professor of internal medicine who specializes in rheumatology. "This may lead to more effective treatments for conditions such as lupus, systemic sclerosis, and the spectrum of inflammatory arthritis, without putting patients at risk for infections," she says. "This phenomenal work is a credit to the strong molecular medicine program here at the University of Utah."

Before a new generation of anti-inflammation drugs can be made, researchers must screen for molecules of chemical compounds that can be turned in pharmaceutical-grade drugs, something the University can and should do, according to Li. This can be accomplished either through collaboration with pharmaceutical companies outside of the state or with sources inside Utah, such as the USTAR initiative.


'/>"/>

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Rheumatoid arthritis patients can get gout too, Mayo Clinic Study finds
2. Researchers identify impact of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus on joint replacement surgery outcomes
3. Hospital-based exercise programs benefit people with osteoarthritis
4. Expensive arthritis treatment no better than steroid therapy
5. Keep Moving to Ease Pain of Knee Arthritis: Review
6. Complementary and alternative therapy improved lives of arthritis patients
7. Elevated Antibody Levels May Predict Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
8. Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Dont Raise Cancer Risk: Study
9. Infections in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Mayo Clinic study finds way to pinpoint risk
10. Introducing decision aids may lower surgery for arthritis
11. Study finds biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis not associated with increased cancer risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... New patients with missing teeth in ... without a referral. Dr. Cotey is a trusted dentist who has placed many dental ... , Patients with missing teeth in Fitchburg, WI, are encouraged to find out if ...
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... , ... Republicans in the United States Senate on Thursday released their ... Act. It differs significantly from the American Health Care Act, which the House passed ... the House will have to take up the Senate version as-is, if it passes. ...
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... 25, 2017 , ... With a heatwave currently bearing down on Northern California pushing temperatures to ... Being swimsuit ready is easy with laser hair removal. , The process of summer ... burdensome routine when all you want to do is get out, dive in and cool ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... ... June 24, 2017 , ... ... at the Sheraton Erie Bayfront and Erie Convention Center on June 8-10. ... exhibits, a student quiz bowl, award and scholarship presentations, and professional networking. ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... Doorknobs are for convenience, deadbolts are for security. , ... dog or having an alarm system installed. But unless there is a working deadbolt ... owner of TX Premier Locksmith in Killeen, TX says: “In the majority of home ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/30/2017)... Therapix Biosciences Ltd. (Nasdaq: TRPX), a ... development of cannabinoid-based drugs, today announced that the ... three upcoming scientific and investor conferences in June: ... ... Wednesday, June 7 ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... , May 25, 2017  In response to the ... , Direct Relief is working with Pfizer to make ... at no cost to community health centers, free and ... nationwide. "Pfizer has a long-standing commitment ... and ensuring patient safety through educational activities," said ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... 2017  Lilac Corp, the company that sells ... of a new website . The website ... clinical study that showed surprising clearance of the ... individuals suffering from HPV warts, precancerous, or cancerous ... no other treatments that clear the virus. Specifically, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: