Navigation Links
Game, Not Gore, Keeps Video Players Playing

Deeper satisfaction trumps violent content among gamers, study finds

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- It's the challenge of a video game, not the violence or gore it depicts, that keeps players playing, a new study says.

Bloodiness, in fact, actually detracts from a game's "fun factor" for most players, according to the findings from the University of Rochester and Immersyve Inc., a firm that researches gamers' experiences.

The study, published online Jan. 16 in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, contradicts the popular notion that violence adds to the gaming experience.

"For the vast majority of players, even those who regularly play and enjoy violent games, violence was not a plus," study lead author Andrew Przybylski, a Rochester graduate student, said in a news release issued by the university.

Even the small subgroup of players who generally report being more aggressive in life and preferring violent content said they didn't receive increased joy from the gruesomeness, Przybylski added.

The research, consisting of two online surveys and four experimental studies, found that overcoming hurdles, getting a feeling of accomplishment and having multiple choices for strategy and action appealed the most to seasoned video gamers and novices alike.

Conflict and war served only as a common and powerful setting for offering those "core reasons that people find games so entertaining and compelling," co-author Richard Ryan, a motivational psychologist at the university, said in the same news release.

The result of the findings, one researcher said, might actually be less violence in new games.

"Much of the debate about game violence has pitted the assumed commercial value of violence against social concern about the harm it may cause," study co-investigator Scott Rigby, president of Immersyve, said in the news release. "Our study shows that the violence may not be the real value component, freeing developers to design away from violence while at the same time broadening their market."

The research team is now investigating what motivates people, whether casual or hard-core gamers, to play video games at all.

"Initially, many games are perceived as being fun," Rigby said. "Much of our work is focused on understanding when games reach to deeper levels of satisfaction that often sustain engagement over time and [identifying] both the healthy and unhealthy aspects of that play."

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and video games.

SOURCE: University of Rochester, news release, Jan. 16, 2009

-- Kevin McKeever

SOURCE: University of Rochester, news release, Jan. 16, 2009

Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. The choking game, psychological distress and bullying
2. Mark & Associates, P.C. & McGinnis, Lochridge, Kilgore, L.L.P. File Lawsuit Against Botox Maker Over Patient Deaths, Injuries
3. Al Gore, Tom Stoppard and Amos Oz Are 2008 Dan David Prize winners
4. New Approach Keeps Tumor Cells From Refueling
5. Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
6. Molecule Keeps Bacteria Like Salmonella in Check
7. Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
8. Cranberry juice creates energy barrier that keeps bacteria away from cells, study shows
9. Fat Spaniel String Monitoring Service Keeps Close Watch on Boulder Cancer Center Solar Array
10. TrimWater Keeps Boston Beautiful
11. Champion Health: Learn How to Create a Unique, Personalized Health Plan That Works and Keeps Working
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Game, Not  Gore, Keeps Video Players Playing
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible ... often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human ... but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and ... their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness at Work Awards took ... the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of 42 businesses to receive ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out ... family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers ... would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ‘Business for a Fair Minimum Wage’ ... 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at the same rate as the median ... floor does not erode again, and make future increases more predictable. , The company is ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Strategic Capital Partners, ... economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. SCP has delivered ... already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital investment for five ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016   Bay Area ... Network,s Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness ... and Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, University of California, ... today announced the five finalists of Lyme ... disease.  More than 100 scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 Dehaier Medical Systems ... "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical devices and ... , signed a strategic cooperation agreement with Hongyuan Supply ... Supply Chain") on June 20, 2016, to develop Dehaier,s ... strategic cooperation agreement, Dehaier will leverage Hongyuan Supply Chain,s ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Mass. , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, ... pharmaceutical company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," ... will increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: