Navigation Links
GW researchers: Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease as interconnected syndromes
Date:7/3/2014

WASHINGTON (July 3, 2014) For more than 40 years, physicians have treated diminished kidney function as two distinct syndromes: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies suggest the two syndromes are not distinct entities, but interconnected. Published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, George Washington University (GW) researchers call for greater follow-up care of patients with AKI, who often present with CKD later in life, and vice versa.

"Our teaching has been wrong and the approach to the patient with decreased renal function has been too limited. Every doctor who sees patients with CKD should think about AKI and every doctor who sees a patient with AKI, should think about CKD as a possible sequel of AKI," said Paul Kimmel, M.D., clinical professor of medicine at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS). "Our review article is written for surgeons, for general internists, for pediatricians, for orthopedists anyone who takes care of patients, because AKI is such a common problem."

AKI, previously called acute renal failure, is often the result of crush injury, a side effect of drugs, or severe infection, and defined as a sudden increase in the serum creatinine concentration and decreased urine output. After recovery, patients receive little to no follow-up care by nephrologists. CKD often lasts a long time, changes slowly, and culminates in dialysis or renal transplantation.

In the article, Kimmel and his co-author, Lakhmir Chawla, M.D., associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at SMHS and physician at the VA Medical Center, outline several findings suggesting that AKI not only is directly linked to the progression of CKD, but can actually cause CKD. Conversely, the presence of CKD is an important risk factor for the development of AKI. Both AKI and CKD have bad outcomes most particularly, cardiovascular disease.

"We need to start with a deeper sense of awareness for physicians, improving the follow-up care of patients who suffer from AKI, which is currently not done very well," said Chawla. "It's not like someone who has a heart attack, where that person will be seen by a cardiologist a couple weeks after they're discharged. A very small percentage of patients who suffer from AKI are seen by a nephrologist after the initial events."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lisa Anderson
lisama2@gwu.edu
202-270-4841
George Washington University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers: Quality of life as important as quantity of life
2. Moffitt researchers: Darwins principles say cancer will always evolve to resist treatment
3. UI researchers: Bracing is effective in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis
4. Researchers: Biomarkers predict effectiveness of radiation treatments for cancer
5. Long-term neuropsychological impairment is common in acute lung injury survivors
6. Predictors identified for rehospitalization among post-acute stroke patients
7. Original research papers on acute cardiovascular care: ESC launches EHJ-ACVC
8. A microRNA prognostic marker identified in acute leukemia
9. 4 acute mushroom poisonings in 2 weeks
10. Scientists identify possible drug target for acute pancreatitis
11. Inhibitors of shuttle molecule show promise in acute leukemia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/16/2017)... OR (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... author, editor, attorney, science teacher, http://www.ageofautism.com/legal , Sharon Kleyne, America’s leading ... Kent Heckenlively to her nationally syndicated radio program, The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... IL (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... (iaedp) organized to provide first-quality education and high-level training standards to an international ... spectrum of eating disorder problems. As a way to further its mission at ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... San Francisco dentist, Dr. ... the latest in 3-D scanning device which is capable of taking digital impressions of ... in dentistry, such as CAD CAM restorations , in terms of speed, efficiency ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... , ... January 16, 2017 , ... NexTec Group has ... group of 100 organizations honored for their accomplishments in the field of midmarket financial ... industry leadership and recognition, and innovation. Selection is not based on revenue and those ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... CINCINNATI, Ohio (PRWEB) , ... January 15, 2017 ... ... their applications, Gensuite’s Community Outreach is a program that strives to better communities ... in each global locations’ community. It also provides the opportunity for team members ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/14/2017)... , Jan. 14, 2017  Johnson & Weaver, LLP ... of purchasers of Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: ... through October 31, 2016 (the "Class Period"). Zimmer ... and markets orthopaedic reconstructive products, such as knee and hip ... ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... , January 13, 2017 Constant research ... AIDS will collectively contribute to the demand for western blotting ... a value of US$ 551.0 Mn by 2016 end. Developing ... the most lucrative markets for western blotting, whereas ... globally. ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... YORK , January 13, 2017 ... equities to see how they have fared at yesterday,s ... ), Galena Biopharma Inc. (NASDAQ: GALE ), ... These companies harness cellular and biomolecular processes to develop ... reduce our environmental footprint, feed the hungry, use less ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: