Navigation Links
GSU study first to confirm long-term benefits of morphine treatment in infants
Date:11/3/2008

ATLANTA A recent study conducted by researchers at Georgia State University is the first of its kind to demonstrate that administration of preemptive morphine prior to a painful procedure in infancy blocks the long-term negative consequences of pain in adult rodents. These studies have serious implications for the way anesthetics and analgesics are administered to neonates prior to surgery. Infant rodents that did not receive preemptive pain medication prior to surgery were less sensitive to the effects of morphine in adulthood. This means that infants undergoing invasive procedures at birth that do not receive any pain medicine will require more morphine in adulthood to modulate their pain.

This study -- conducted by Anne Z. Murphy, Ph.D., a GSU Professor of Neuroscience and member of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, and graduate student Jamie LaPrairie -- has serious clinical implications for the more than 400,000 human infants that are admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU) in the United States each year.

Past studies have shown human infants born between 25-42 weeks gestation experience on average 14 painful procedures per day during the first two weeks of life with fewer than 35 percent receiving appropriate analgesic therapy.

"While such surgical procedures in preterm infants are clearly necessary, the resulting pain and inflammation has been shown to lead to negative behavioral consequences later in life," Murphy said. "Our previous studies have shown that, just as in humans, neonatal inflammation in rodents (that did not receive preemptive pain medication) results in an increase in sensitivity to pain, stress, and decreased reaction to morphine as adults.

While evidence exists that morphine is efficacious in neonatal rodents, this is the first study to confirm the long-term behavioral benefits.

In this study, published online in Pediatric Research, a group of rat pups received an injection of morphine sulfate on the day of birth prior to inducing inflammation; another group received a saline injection instead. The groups were then raised identically and received identical procedures during a 60-day period. Rodents that received preemptive morphine behaved normally while those rats that received saline showed significant increases in pain sensitivity and were resistant to the pain relieving effects of morphine in adulthood.

"This tells us that morphine doesn't work very well in human children and adults that were formally in the NICU and didn't receive preemptive pain treatment, and since morphine is still the primary drug used to treat severe pain, this means that there is an entire subpopulation for which morphine doesn't work efficiently," Murphy said. "These results suggest that there are long-term benefits of providing all newborns with some sort of pain relieving medicine prior to the initiation of an invasive procedure."


'/>"/>

Contact: Martha Barker Koontz
mbarker@gsu.edu
404-413-5464
Georgia State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
5. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
6. Preclinical study suggests organ-transplant drug may aid in lupus fight
7. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
8. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
9. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
10. Pitt study finds inequality in tobacco advertising
11. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Military Connection friend and veteran ... the JFK Virgin Atlantic lounge. , Bensko is no stranger to the plight ... Bensko dedicated her life to supporting our wounded veterans. A world-class photographer, her riveting ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... The Aesthetic Channel has recently highlighted ... has come up with a proprietary technique that he calls the AuraLyft ... dropped. For all ages, patients can expect to look refreshed, rejuvenated, and revitalized. ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... 21 Middle East and South Asia Leaders Selected as ... government, business and civil society in 11 countries across the Middle East and South ... a transformative exchange of knowledge and ideas with the leading minds in their fields. ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Ross Insurance Agency ... the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) recent update of flood zones, more people ... the Biggert-Waters Act was enacted to reflect the actual risk in flood zone ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... Dunmore, PA (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 ... ... provides insurance management, financial planning, and related services to families and business owners ... for a charity drive to benefit senior citizens in the area. , Meals ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/10/2017)... June 9, 2017  Shane K. Burchfield, DPM, is recognized by ... as a Podiatrist in Alabama . ... First Foot Care. He brings over 20 years of experience, as ... and healthcare, to his role. ... PC is pleased to welcome you to his practice," ...
(Date:6/8/2017)... 2017   Responding to Heath Ledger,s father,s ... of singer Chris Cornell in May, the mental ... a free online psychiatric drug side effects ... about psychotropic drug risks. The father of ... an accidental overdose, has called for tighter rules on prescription ...
(Date:6/7/2017)... 6, 2017  Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group, a brand of Diplomat ... its Iowa location. The ... now features an ISO 7 cleanroom—the standard needed to compound intravenous ... low level of pollutants. "Our ... and better serve our Iowa patients," said ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: